Undergraduates: Open Research Positions & Projects

Students: contact Dr. Anna Babakhanyan, Science Undergraduate Research advisor, to help identify research laboratories.
Faculty: if you are interested in posting your open research position, please contact  Dr. Anna Babakhanyan.

 

Fall 2021 Academic Term

 

Research Opportunity to study the neuronal mechanisms underlying metabolism and reproduction, Dr. Victor Navarro’s lab, BWH, Posted Dec 1, 2021

 

Undergraduate research opportunity at the Laboratory for Computational Neuroimaging, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH, Posted Nov 22, 2021 

Clinical Research Intern, Dr. Osama Hamdy Lab, Joslin Diabetes Center (in-person), Posted Nov 22, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Eric Smith Lab for Synthetic Biology, mRNA, and Cellular Therapies, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute / Harvard Medical School, Posted Nov 22, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cognitive Neuroscience Group (CNG), MGH Institute of Health Professions, Posted Oct 29, 2021

In-Person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Wayne Marasco Lab, DFCI, Posted Oct 20, 2021

Does the “same” protein work the same in humans and bacteria?, Posted Oct 8, 2021

Exploring the dynamics of a cell cycle regulator by time-resolved crystallography, Posted Oct 8, 2021

Mapping the functional transitions of proteins using DNA springs, Posted Oct 8, 2021

Redox imaging of yeast physiology after gain or loss of a chromosome, Posted Oct 8, 2021

In Person undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Vandana Gupta’s lab, BWH, Posted Oct 7, 2021

Undergraduate research opportunity, Schacter Memory Lab, Harvard University, Posted Oct 6, 2021

Undergraduate opportunity for public outreach, Dr. Warinner Lab, Anthropology Department, Posted Oct 6, 2021

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Warinner Lab, Anthropology Department, Posted Oct 6, 2021

Undergraduate research opportunity in virology, Nibert Lab at Harvard Medical School, Posted Oct 6, 2021

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Alan Beggs Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital/ Harvard Medical School, Posted Oct 6, 2021

Undergraduate Research Assistant, Prof. Rifat Atun, Health Systems Innovation Lab, HSPH, Posted Sep 22, 2021

Clinical Research Intern, Dr. Lael Yonker Lab, Massachusetts General Hospital, Posted Sep 20, 2021

Remote/On site research opportunity – a web based virtual reality app for assessing cognitively impaired or visually impaired drivers, HMS, Posted Sep 14, 2021

Remote/On site research opportunity – AI app to help with accessing public transportation for visually impaired people, HMS, Posted Sep 14, 2021

Undergraduate Clinical Research Opportunity, Brain and Eye Pain Imaging Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital, Posted Sep 14, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Stoklosa, BWH, Posted Sep 10, 2021

In-person research opportunity, Dr. Balaj, Massachusetts General Hospital, Posted Sep 10, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Hodi Lab, DFCI, Posted Sep 10, 2021

In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Brain Disease Drug Discovery, Tang Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital, Posted Sep 10, 2021

Undergraduate Clinical Research Intern, MGH, Posted Sep 3, 2021

In-person Research Opportunity, Dr. Sun’s lab, Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary/Schepens Eye Research Institute, Posted Sep 3, 2021

Undergraduate Researcher, Dr. Artur Indzykulian Lab, Harvard Medical School, Posted Sep 3, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Pediatric Surgery Research at Dr. Griggs’s lab, MGH/HMS, Posted Sep 3, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Investigating the role of bacterial communication in infection, Rahme Lab, MGH/HMS, Posted Sep 3, 2021

Analysis of whole-embryo microscopy datasets, Extavour Lab, OEB/MCB, Posted Aug 31, 2021

Microbiome and Cancer Immunotherapy Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Kasper Lab, HMS, Posted Aug 30, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity-2, Dr. Gabriel Kreiman Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital and HMS, Posted Aug 30, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Gabriel Kreiman Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital and HMS, Posted Aug 30, 2021

Computational embryology, remote or in person, Megason lab, HMS, Posted Aug 26, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in MRI-guided Focused Ultrasound Brain Therapy, BWH, Posted Aug 26, 2021

Undergraduate Mycological Volunteer Opportunities at the Farlow Herbarium, OEB, Posted Aug 26, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Neuroimaging, Dr. Wang Lab, MGH, Posted Aug 26, 2021

Does the “same” protein work the same in humans and bacteria?, MCB, Posted Aug 26, 2021

Benchmarking non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, MCB, Posted Aug 26, 2021

Exploring the dynamics of a cell cycle regulator by time-resolved crystallography, MCB, Posted Aug 26, 2021

Exploring the dynamics of a cell cycle regulator by time-resolved crystallography, MCB, Posted Aug 26, 2021

Mapping the functional transitions of proteins using DNA springs, SEAS, Posted Aug 26, 2021

Redox imaging of yeast physiology after gain or loss of a chromosome, Dept. MCB, Posted Aug 24, 2021

Improving analysis of crystallographic drug screens using machine learning, Dept. MCB, Posted Aug 24, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Gunderson Personality Disorders Institute (GPDI), McLean Hospital, Posted Aug 24, 2021

Undergraduate volunteer position, Jurkunas Lab, MEEI, Posted Aug 24, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Schacter Memory Lab, Harvard Psychology Department, Posted Aug 24, 2021

Undergraduate Research Position, Gonzalez-Rosa Lab, MGH, Posted Aug 23, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Blacklow Lab, BCMP department, HMS, Posted Aug 23, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunities, Center for Engineering in Medicine and Surgery, MGH, Posted Aug 23, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in computational biology, Dr. Scott T. Weiss Lab, BWH and HMS, Posted Aug 23, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Bioengineering | Dr. Melero-Martin Lab, Boston Children's Hospital | Harvard Medical School | Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Posted Aug 23, 2021

Experimental Therapeutics and Molecular Imaging In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Tannous Lab, MGH/HMS, Posted Aug 23, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational and Systems Biology at Zomorrodi Lab, MGH/HMS, Posted Aug 23, 2021

Undergraduate opportunity to study knee osteoarthritis in the Quantitative Musculoskeletal Imaging Group Research (Q-MIG), Radiology Dept., BWH, Posted Aug 23, 2021

Undergraduate Research Intern, The Valera Lab, MGH, Posted Aug 23, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunities – Clohessy Leukemia and Translation Lab, BIDMC, Posted Aug 23, 2021

Unraveling the neuronal circuits in the zebrafish brain, Dept. of MCB, Harvard Univ., Posted Aug 23, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Srivastava Lab, OEB, Posted Aug 23, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, NOMBIT Lab, MGH, Posted Aug 23, 2021

In-Person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Wayne Marasco Laboratory, DFCI, Posted Aug 19, 2021

In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Brain Disease Drug Discovery, Tang Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital, Posted Aug 19, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cell & Gene Therapy, Church Lab, Wyss Institute, Posted Aug 19, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Ciolino Lab, Mass.Eye and Ear, Posted Aug 19, 2021

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Priolo Lab, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Posted Aug 19, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dept. of Sociology, Harvard University, Posted Aug 19, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Chemical Biology and Organic Chemistry, Dr. Kim Lab, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/HMS, Posted Aug 19, 2021

Research Opportunity in Translational Neuroscience Center, BCH, Posted Aug 18, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity - Dr. Rotenberg Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital, Posted Aug 18, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cardiovascular Imaging Research Center, MGH, Posted Aug 18, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Wei Tao Lab, BWH/HMS, Posted Aug 18, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity at the Center for Surgery and Public Health, BWH, Posted Aug 18, 2021

Undergraduate research opportunity, Viswanathan Lab, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/HMS, Posted Aug 17, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Multiomics using Machine Learning, Wadduwage Lab, Posted Aug 17, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Choudhury Lab, BCH, Posted Aug 17, 2021

Undergraduate research opportunity, Cognitive Neuroscience Group (Dr. Yael Arbel), MGH Institute of Health Professions, Posted Aug 17, 2021

Molecular Neurogenetics In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Breakefield Lab, MGH/HMS, Posted Aug 17, 2021

In-person/Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Liron Bar-Peled, MGH/HMS, Posted Aug 16, 2021

Undergraduate research using CRISPR screening to understand and treat genetic disease, Posted Aug 16, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, LCN, Martinos Center, MGH, Posted Aug 16, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity with Kaur Lab, BIDMC, Posted Aug 16, 2021

Cell division undergraduate research opportunity, Harvard, Posted Aug 16, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in biomedicine, Dr. Zygmanski Lab, BWH, Posted Aug 16, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Nahrendorf Lab, MGH, Posted Aug 16, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in the Ruvkun lab, MGH, Posted Aug 16, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in the Henske Lab, Posted Aug 16, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Elisabetta del Re, BIDMC, Posted Aug 16, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Anderson Group - Solar-powered Aircraft - Structural, Posted Aug 16, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Anderson Group - Solar-powered Aircraft - Fluid Dynamics, Posted Aug 16, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunities in Dr. Norbert Perrimon lab at HMS, Posted Aug 16, 2021

Undergraduate Researcher: Epigenetic Mediators of Metabolic Disease, Joslin Diabetes Center, Posted Aug 12, 2021

Influence of particulate matter physical properties on air quality and climate, Martin Lab, ESE/EPS, Posted Aug 12, 2021

Undergraduate Research Position, Orefice Lab, MGH, Posted Jul 21, 2021

Remote or in person neuroscience/mental health/psychosis and genetics research, Posted Jul 21, 2021

Aging and epigenetics undergraduate research opportunity, HMS, Posted Jul 1, 2021

Student Research Intern - Shrestha Auditory Research, MEEI, Posted June 28, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunities at Zomorrodi Lab, MGH/HMS, Posted June 14, 2021

Undergraduate Research Internship, Nucera Group, BIDMC, Posted June 4, 2021

Undergraduate research opportunity, Viswanathan Lab, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/HMS, Posted June 3, 2021

 

Spring 2021 Academic Term

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Rashidian, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/HMS, Posted May 25, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Computational and Systems Biology at Zomorrodi Lab, MGH/HMS, Posted May 10, 2021

In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Sun’s lab, Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary, Posted April 21, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunities in photoimmunotherapy, MGH for summer 2021, Posted April 12, 2021

Dual function antibody conjugates for oral cancer management, MGH (onsite), Posted April 12, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance, MGH (Remote/Onsite Mix), Posted April 12, 2021 

Study of gender, racial disparity, wellness in academic disciplines, with Dr. Fiona Fennessy, BWH, Posted April 5, 2021

Undergraduate research opportunity, Thoracic Surgery Research Labs, MGH, Posted Apr 1, 2021

Remote undergraduate research opportunity at Surgical Planning Lab, BWH/HMS, Posted Mar 18, 2021 

Remote undergraduate research opportunity at Surgical Planning Lab, BWH/HMS, Posted Mar 18, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, MJ Lab, Harvard Medical School/MGH, Posted Mar 18, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational Biology and Network Medicine, BWH, Posted Mar 10, 2021

In person/Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, HSPH, Posted Mar 5, 2021

Remote undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Vandana Gupta’s lab, BWH, Posted Mar 5, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Hirschhorn’s Lab, Boston Children's Hospital, Posted Mar 4, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Laboratory of Dr. Chris Walsh, Boston Children’s Hospital, Posted Feb 25, 2021

Scalable engineering of iPSC-derived living blood vessels / In person research opportunity, Prof. Elliot Chaikof lab, BIDMC/HMS, Posted Feb 25, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Assistant, Collaboration between Harvard Medical School and Partners In Health, Posted Feb 23, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Neuroimaging and Deep Learning, Dr. Wang Lab, MGH, Posted Feb 22, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity on Forced Migration and Antenatal Care, FXB Center For Health and Human Rights at Harvard, HSPH, Posted Feb 18, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Clinical Data Science Research Opportunity, Dr. Crowson’s Lab, MEEI, Posted Feb 18, 2021

On site research project in laboratory of Dr. Lichterfeld and Dr. Xu Yu at Ragon Institute, Posted Feb 18 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Osama Hamdy Lab, Joslin Diabetes Center, Feb 17, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Surgical Localization and Mapping Lab, BWH, Posted Feb 17, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in the Aizenberg Biomineralization and Biomimetics Lab, Posted Feb 17, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Surgical Localization and Mapping Lab, BWH, Posted Feb 17, 2021

Design of Intracellular Chromosome Supercoiling Sensor, Remote/In-Person Research Opportunity, MCB, Posted Feb 17, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Marcia Goldberg, MGH, Posted Feb 17, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity: In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Perfusion Imaging of Brain Tumors - Dr. Eva-Maria Ratai Lab, MGH, Posted Feb 17, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Medical Education Research Opportunity, Dr. Miya Bernson-Leung, BCH, Posted Feb 17, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, MGH Biostatistics Center and HMS, Posted Feb 11, 2021

Research Opportunity - Harvard Injury Control Research Center, HSPH, Posted Feb 11, 2021

Lee Kum Sheung Center for Health and Happiness Summer Internship Program, HSPH, Posted Feb 10, 2021

Integrative analysis of ALS plasma metabolomics using machine learning, MIT, Posted Feb 10, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity: Computer recreation of the beginning of life, Dr. Megason Lab, HMS, Posted Feb 10, 2021

Measuring fundamental planet parameters of a multi-planet system discovered by NASA’s TESS mission, Posted Feb 10, 2021

Instrumentation Development for Rubin Observatory, Chile, Posted Feb 9, 2021

On-site and virtual Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Marcia Haigis Lab, HMS, Posted Feb 9, 2021

In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Prof. Vamsi Mootha’s Lab, MGH/Broad/HMS/HHMI, Posted Feb 9, 2021

In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cheng Lab, MGH, Posted Feb 9, 2021

Remote Research Opportunity –Eye Image Analysis by Deep Learning, Posted Feb 9, 2021

Remote Research Opportunity – 3D Street Mapping for Visually Impaired, Posted Feb 9, 2021

Undergraduate Summer Research Project, The Massachusetts Host-Microbiome Center, Posted Feb 9, 2021

Technical Undergraduate Research Assistant, Dr. Martha Bulyk Laboratory, BWH, Posted Feb 9, 2021

In-person/Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Liron Bar-Peled, MGH, Posted Feb 5, 2021

Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering research opportunity at the Rowland Institute, Posted Feb 1, 2021 

Undergraduate neuroscience research opportunity at the Rowland Institute, Posted Jan 14, 2021

Undergraduate Research: MGHfC Digestive Diseases, Posted Jan 5, 2021

 

Fall 2020 Academic Term

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Rashidian, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/HMS, Posted Dec 18, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational and Systems Biology at Zomorrodi Lab, HMS, Posted Dec 17, 2020

Undergraduate Research Position, Dr. Weng Lab, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Posted Dec 17, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Drs. Sepucha and Valentine, Health Decision Sciences Center, MGH, Posted Nov 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cognitive Neuroscience Group (CNG), MGH Institute of Health Professions, Posted Nov 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Sang Park, BCH, Posted Sep 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Thoracic Surgery Research at Dr. Yang’s lab, MGH/HMS, Posted Sep 16, 2020

Research Assistant, Demehri Laboratory, Center for Cancer Immunology, Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School, Posted Sep 3, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Radiation Physics and Instrumentation Lab, MGH, Posted Sep 3, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Computational Parasite Genomics, Neafsey Lab, Broad Institute/HSPH, Posted Aug 31, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Evolution of Drug Resistance, Neafsey Lab, Broad Institute/HSPH, Posted Aug 31, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Cancer Genomics at Dr. Kwiatkowski lab, BWH/HMS, Posted Aug 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Tropical Forest Ecology, Dr. Moorcroft Lab, OEB, Posted Aug 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational and Systems Biology at Zomorrodi Lab, HMS, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Industrial Robot, Biorobotics Lab, Harvard SEAS, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Biorobotics Lab, Harvard SEAS, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Synho Do, Ph.D., MGH, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Krichevsky Lab, BWH, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, Department of Statistics, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Undergraduate Research Opportunity with the Stroke microsimulation, HSPH, Posted Aug 26, 2020

 

Posted Dec 1, 2021

 

Research Opportunity to study the neuronal mechanisms underlying metabolism and reproduction, Dr. Victor Navarro’s lab, BWH

Contact information:  Victor M Navarro. Medicine (Endocrinology), BWH 221 Longwood Ave, Boston

Tel: +1 617 525 6566 Fax: +1 617 582 6193

Email: vnavarro@bwh.harvard.edu Lab website: http://navarrolab.bwh.harvard.edu

Project description and duties:

Our lab focuses on the characterization of the central factors that regulate reproduction and metabolism including, but not limited to, Kiss1 and melanocortin neurons using a variety of genetic mouse models and viral delivery approaches. The student will be involved in the study of the neuronal mechanisms that regulate reproductive axis and metabolic function, along with the neuronal circuitry that links reproduction to energy balance. He or she will be involved in the development and maintenance of mouse colonies, performing anatomical studies, determination of gene and protein expression in the brain (PCR, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, etc) and stereotaxic injections of viral constructs to modify the expression of targeted genes. In addition, he/she will also be involved in the characterization of a number of biological parameters that define reproductive and metabolic functions (e.g. fertility assessments, daily monitoring of puberty onset, body weight, food intake, etc). The student will be expected to work in collaboration with other members of the lab but in an independent manner. He/she will be encouraged to present their data at local and regional meetings, analyze their data and prepare them for publication

Skills requiredPassion, dedication, commitment and ability to work with live mice. Prior research experience is a plus but not required. Some coursework in neuroscience and molecular biology would be helpful. Experience with MATLAB is a plus but not mandatory.

Learning outcomes: The student that joins our lab is expected to acquire knowledge of neuroanatomy and physiology of the neuronal networks that govern the endocrine system. He or She will gain experience in the handling of mice and maintenance of animal colonies as well as in the planning and performing of experimental protocols, analysis and interpretation of results and presentation of the data in lab meetings and conferences.
Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if it is negotiable, state so) Negotiable

Mentoring: The student will be mentored by myself and Rajae Talbi, a senior postdoc in the lab. Weekly meetings will be held.
Does laboratory provide any funds to pay student’s stipend? If not state that students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

No stipend is provided so the student is encouraged to apply for fellowships.

Email your resume to Vnavarro@bwh.harvard.edu and rtalbi@bwh.harvard.edu
 

 

Posted Nov 22, 2o21

Undergraduate research opportunity at the Laboratory for Computational Neuroimaging, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH 

PI: Anastasia Yendiki, Ph.D., Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging

149 13th St. Suite 2301, Charlestown, MA 02129

ayendiki@mgh.harvard.edu

http://scholar.harvard.edu/a-y

 

The student researcher will contribute to a project that aims to map connections in the human brain, based on a combination of in vivo diffusion MRI brain scans with prior information from microscopic resolution ex vivo MRI and optical imaging. Brain pathways will be labeled manually to produce training data for an automated image analysis algorithm. Algorithms developed by our team learn the anatomical neighborhood of the pathways from such training data and then reconstruct the same pathways automatically in novel data sets. Depending on the student researcher's interests and skills, the work can focus more on neuroanatomical exploration of the in vivo and ex vivo data, software development, or both.

Prior experience working in a Unix-based computer environment is desired but not required.

The student will gain experience in neuroanatomy and in the analysis of neuroimaging data. Depending on progress and interest, the student may also assist with preparing conference abstracts and publications.

Project duration and hours per week are negotiable.

The student will be mentored by Dr. Yendiki and a postdoctoral research fellow. There will be opportunities to participate in weekly group meetings, as well as receive one-on-one mentoring as needed.

Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

Please email a resume and a short (one paragraph) description of your research interests and career goals to Dr. Yendiki (ayendiki@mgh.harvard.edu).

 

Clinical Research Intern, Dr. Osama Hamdy Lab, Joslin Diabetes Center (in-person)

Contact information:  Dr. Osama Hamdy, Joslin Diabetes Center, One Joslin Place, Boston, MA 02115
https://www.joslin.org/find-an-expert/osama-hamdy

Project description and duties: This internship experience will provide the student the opportunity to:

  • Learn about novel diabetes medications and medical devices
  • Recruit patients that meet inclusion criteria for studies by searching medical histories
  • Entering data and preparing it for analysis
  • Shadow patient visits
  • Train for taking vitals

Skills required: No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcomes:

  • Apply skills, gain exposure to, and be provided training and learning opportunities in a real world setting
  • Utilize the coursework studied within the individual’s academic program
  • Further expand the intern’s  knowledge and skill set
  • Establish mentorship(s) and receive feedback on completed assignments

Number of hours: The number of hours per week is negotiable, although typically students stay for the length of the project (6-12 months)  

Mentoring: Clinical Research Coordinators, Clinical Research Fellows and our PI, Dr. Osama Hamdy, will be mentoring the undergraduates. We have weekly zoom meetings.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position.

Application information: If interested, please email your resume to Shilton.dhaver@joslin.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Eric Smith Lab for Synthetic Biology, mRNA, and Cellular Therapies, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute / Harvard Medical School

Contact information: Eric Smith, MD, Ph.D.

Director of Translational Research, Immune Effector Cell Therapies

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; Dana Bldg 730; Longwood

Contact lab manager: timothy_haggerty@dfci.harvard.edu

EricSmithLab.dana-farber.org/

Project description and duties: Pre-clinical development of CAR T and mRNA immunotherapies for cancer

The dual scientific missions of our pre-clinical lab group is (1) to design and evaluate novel approaches to advance the field of adoptive cellular therapy, and (2) to rapidly get these therapies into the hands of clinicians to treat cancer patients with the greatest need. The ability to isolate, expand, and in particular genetically manipulate cells for therapeutic purposes endows the field of adoptive cellular therapy unlimited potential. CAR T cell vectors stemming from our research are in phase I and II clinical studies for the treatment of multiple myeloma. While the current breed of cell therapies are a huge leap forward for the treatment of hematologic malignancies, they mark only the earliest stages of the evolution of cellular immunotherapy. The Smith Lab for Synthetic Biology and Cellular Engineering uses the latest advances in gene engineering and cellular manipulation to design and screen novel strategies and, in close partnership with the Connell O’Reilly GMP Cell Manipulation Core Facility at Dana-Farber, translate these advances to the clinic.

Our core values include, first and foremost, conducting science that will improve the lives of patients. To achieve this goal we foster an environment that values trust, diversity, mentorship, and team science. Trust: we strive to be a place of respect (and fun) and one where everyone feels safe to challenge each other to elevate our science. Diversity: of people and ideas will strengthen our science and enrich our experience. Mentorship: to bring out the best of every person who joins our team. Team science: as a member of Dana-Farber, Harvard Medical School, the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Mass Brigham, the i3 (Immune-Engineering to Improve Immunotherapy) Center at the Wyss Institute and situated in Boston, the greatest city in the world for academic and biotech innovation; the rich collaborations and resources in our community shape our work.

Skills required: Students with basic biology lab skillsets are encouraged to apply, however, no prior research experience is required. Students will have the opportunity to work with senior scientists in the lab to be trained for lab techniques. We are looking for students that are exceptionally self-motivated, with excellent communication skills, able to work both independently and within a team environment, with outstanding planning, organizational, multi-tasking skills, and finally attention to detail and thorough in completing work tasks.

Learning outcomes: Research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing, as well as lab skillsets such as cell culture, protein engineering, protein expression and purification, ELISA analysis, protein labeling, and working with instruments such as automated microscopy and flow cytometry. Students will learn mammalian cell culture, flow cytometry, molecular biology (plasmid construction, CRISPR gene editing), and viral transduction to generate gene modified immune effector cells.

Number of hours Negotiable

Mentoring:

Dr. Smith is deeply committed to the growth and success of each trainee that joins the lab. He believes that mentorship is not something that happens in the background as trainees pursue their research, but should be intentional, thought out, and personalized for each member of the group.​

Dr. Smith will meet 1:1 with student on regular basis.  Additional day-to-day mentorship will occur with other senior lab members.

Student stipend: Students are encouraged to register for a research course credit. If course credit will not be applied for a stipend is available based on time commitment of the student. If desired the PI will work with students to apply for available fellowship programs (HCRP, PRISE, etc.). Students are encouraged to stay on for full time paid employment after graduation.  

Application information: Motivated students should contact Tim Haggerty with resume; career goals and timelines; hourly commitment per week sought; and a breif description of why they are interested in the position at: timothy_haggerty@dfci.harvard.edu

 

 

Posted Oct 29, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cognitive Neuroscience Group (CNG), MGH Institute of Health Professions

 

PI name, department, contact information, location, lab website:

Lauryn Zipse, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, lzipse@mghihp.edu, 617-871-9707

Charlestown Navy Yard, 36 1st Avenue, Boston

 

Description of the project and duties (link to published manuscripts describing the work):

The research assistant will use acoustic analysis software to label and analyze speech produced by people with aphasia and control participants. The current project is an extension of this work: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/321725212_Speak_along_without_t...

 

Skills required. (Are students expected to have any laboratory skills, if so what are they?) If no prior research experience is required, state so and it will encourage students to apply since most do not have prior research experience.

No prior research experience is required. Some familiarity with coding is preferred but not required.

 

Learning outcome: laboratory skills, research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentations, scientific writing, etc.

The research assistant will learn about speech science, how to apply analysis scripts to analyze data, and data organization. There will also be opportunities to learn about acquired communication disorders frequently seen after stroke, particularly aphasia and apraxia of speech.

 

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if it is negotiable, state so)

The duration and weekly time commitment are negotiable. A minimum commitment of 8 hrs/week is required. Some of the work can be done remotely.

 

Mentoring: who will be mentoring student, how often are mentorship meetings, etc.

The research assistant will be mentored by a PhD student and the PI.

 

Does laboratory provide any funds to pay student’s stipend? If not state that students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

This is a paid position.

 

What information students need to submit and contact information for submitting this information: (ex. Email your resume to Dr. Smith at ….)

To apply, please email a cover letter and resume to lzipse@mghihp.edu with the subject line, “applying for RA position.”

 

 

 

Posted Oct 20, 2021

In-Person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Wayne Marasco Lab, DFCI

Contact information: PI: Wayne Marasco. Contact: Matthew Chang, matthewr_chang@dfci.harvard.edu. The lab is located in the Longwood area in DFCI’s Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology (https://marascolab.dana-farber.org/).

Project description and duties: We have a number of available projects focused on developing novel CAR T cells and checkpoint modulating antibodies for various indications. Additionally, our lab is working on identifying broadly neutralizing influenza and coronavirus antibodies and characterizing the immune response from vaccinated and infected individuals. Students will be responsible for executing experiments and analyzing the results, as well as assisting other lab members to broaden their research experience.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required. Students are expected to commit to the agreed upon schedule, be well organized, have good time management skills, pay careful attention to experimental details, and have excellent communication skills. Students should also have a desire to learn and be self-motivated to carry out their projects. Completion of a general biology course is a plus.

Learning outcomes: Students in the Marasco Lab will gain hands on experience in antibody and/or CAR-T discovery, characterization, and engineering and will have a unique opportunity to contribute to projects headed towards clinical development. They will also have an opportunity to improve their research skills (experimental design and execution, data analysis) and are expected to provide updates and present during group meetings.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: Time commitments are negotiable, however we recommend 10-20 hrs/week for the academic semester and 40 hrs/week during the summer.

Mentoring: Students will work directly with a postdoc or scientist in our lab and other lab members are available for support as needed. Additional mentorship will be provided by Dr. Marasco. Students are expected to attend and present during group meetings (as their schedule allows).

Student stipend: The Marasco Lab is not able to provide stipends to students, however we are happy to support applications to available undergraduate research fellowships.

Application information: Interested students should submit a resume and a brief paragraph describing their interest in the lab to Matthew Chang (matthewr_chang@dfci.harvard.edu).

 

 

Posted Oct 8, 2021

Does the “same” protein work the same in humans and bacteria?

Contact information:

Doeke Hekstra, Dept of Molecular & Cellular Biology, and Applied Physics, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences,

doeke_hekstra@harvard.edu, Northwest Lab 311, https://hekstralab.fas.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

Proteins are like little machines. In order to function, an enzyme must proceed through a highly orchestrated set of motions. In the Hekstra lab, we're interested in using the tools of X-ray crystallography - specifically, electric-field-stimulated crystallography (EF-X) and multi-temperature crystallography (MT-X) - to understand how these motions work.

Recently, we have made some interesting findings about the mechanics of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), an important model system and drug target. We are looking for an interested undergraduate student to establish an analogous project with the human version of DHFR. You would collaborate closely with a graduate student in optimizing protein expression, purification, and crystallization. You would also be involved in project design and the interpretation of novel results.

Skills required: Experience with chromatographic methods and an understanding of basic physical chemistry and organic chemistry concepts is not essential but a plus. A computational component is optional depending on your progress and interests.

Learning outcomes: The project introduces the student to experimental lab skills which are commonly needed in biochemistry and structural biology, and improves their ability to collaborate and present their work.

Number of hours: Students are expected to work around 10 hours per week on the project, with a minimal commitment of one semester (an intent to stay longer is a plus).

Mentoring: A graduate will mentor the student daily, with, weekly meetings with the PI. The student is strongly encouraged to participate in all lab activities, including group meetings.

Student stipend:

Volunteer position. We will gladly support applications for support from HCRP, PRISE, and other fellowships.

Application information:

Interested students should send a short introductory email to Dr. Hekstra, describing their interests and referencing any relevant experience they already have. A resume or CV is optional.

 

 

Exploring the dynamics of a cell cycle regulator by time-resolved crystallography

Contact information:

Doeke Hekstra, Dept of Molecular & Cellular Biology, and Applied Physics, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences,

doeke_hekstra@harvard.edu, Northwest Lab 311, https://hekstralab.fas.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

Controlling the cell cycle, the process by which a cell divides, is crucial for cell renewal in our body. However, when cells divide uncontrollably, cancers arise. A key regulator of cell division, the Ras protein, is often mutated in cancers and has therefore been the subject of intense biochemistry research (Parker and Mattos 2018), but we still lack enough understanding to design effective anti-cancer drugs that target Ras-based signaling. The structural dynamics, or internal motions, of the Ras proteins are of interest both for their role in better understanding the functional transitions they undergo as they perform their cellular functions (Parker, Volmar et al. 2018) and because they provide new options for the design of drugs. We have developed a time-resolved X-ray crystallography technique that lets us directly push and pull on specific charged chemical groups on protein molecules and see the resulting internal motions as they propagate through the protein using short X-ray pulses (Hekstra, White et al. 2016), and established that crystals of a Ras protein are tractable by this approach (unpublished data). We are looking for someone who is interested in learning all steps of the measurement, starting from protein and expression through measurements and computational analysis

References:

Review article: Parker JA, Mattos C. The K-Ras, N-Ras, and H-Ras Isoforms: Unique Conformational Preferences and Implications for Targeting Oncogenic Mutants. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med. 2018 Aug 1;8(8):a031427. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a031427. PMID: 29038336; PMCID: PMC6071550.

Parker JA, Volmar AY, Pavlopoulos S, Mattos C. K-Ras Populates Conformational States Differently from Its Isoform H-Ras and Oncogenic Mutant K-RasG12D. Structure. 2018 Jun 5;26(6):810-820.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.str.2018.03.018. Epub 2018 Apr 26. PMID: 29706533.

Hekstra DR, White KI, Socolich MA, Henning RW, Šrajer V, Ranganathan R. Electric-field-stimulated protein mechanics. Nature. 2016 Dec 15;540(7633):400-405. doi: 10.1038/nature20571. Epub 2016 Dec 7. PMID: 27926732; PMCID: PMC5730412.

Skills required: Experience with chromatographic methods and an understanding of basic physical chemistry and organic chemistry concepts is not essential but a real plus. The computational component is optional depending on your progress and interests.

Learning outcomes: The project introduces the student to experimental lab skills which are commonly needed in biochemistry and structural biology, and improves their ability to collaborate and present their work.

Number of hours: Students are expected to work around 10 hours per week on the project, with a minimal commitment of one semester (an intent to stay longer is a plus).

Mentoring: A graduate will mentor the student daily, with, weekly meetings with the PI. The student is strongly encouraged to participate in all lab activities, including group meetings.

Student stipend:

Volunteer position. We will gladly support applications for support from HCRP, PRISE, and other fellowships.

Application information:

Interested students should send a short introductory email to Dr. Hekstra, describing their interests and referencing any relevant experience they already have. A resume or CV is optional.

 

 

Mapping the functional transitions of proteins using DNA springs

Contact information:

Doeke Hekstra, Dept of Molecular & Cellular Biology, and Applied Physics, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences,

doeke_hekstra@harvard.edu, Northwest Lab 311, https://hekstralab.fas.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

To perform their many functions in the human body, proteins constantly need to undergo internal motions to interconvert between different states. The nature of these motions is often hard to study. Recent work by the Zocchi group at UCLA shows that one can use double-stranded DNA springs to put force across pairs of surface sites and see an effect on protein activity. How this works on the atomic scale is not known. To address this gap, we have developed a protocol to prepare enough of these protein-DNA “chimeras” to perform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy measurements. We’d like your help with preparing such chimeras and performing and interpreting NMR studies of their structure and dynamics. The project can be extended to include a molecular dynamics simulation component if the student is interested.

Skills required: Experience with chromatographic methods and an understanding of basic physical chemistry and organic chemistry concepts is not essential but a real plus.

Learning outcomes: The project introduces the student to experimental lab skills which are commonly needed in biochemistry and molecular biology, and improves their ability to collaborate and present their work.

Number of hours: Students are expected to work around 10 hours per week on the project, with a minimal commitment of one semester (an intent to stay longer is a plus).

Mentoring: A research assistant will mentor the student daily, with, weekly meetings with the PI. The student is strongly encouraged to participate in all lab activities, including group meetings.

Student stipend:

Volunteer position. We will gladly support applications for support from HCRP, PRISE, and other fellowships.

Application information:

Interested students should send a short introductory email to Dr. Hekstra, describing their interests and referencing any relevant experience they already have. A resume or CV is optional.

 

 

Redox imaging of yeast physiology after gain or loss of a chromosome

Contact information:

Doeke Hekstra, Dept of Molecular & Cellular Biology, and Applied Physics, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences,

doeke_hekstra@harvard.edu, Northwest Lab 311, https://hekstralab.fas.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

The gain or loss of chromosomes (aneuploidy) presents a major challenge to the functioning of cells and is a frequent hallmark of cancers. Aneuploidy can affect both the metabolism and division of cells. Little is known about what the metabolic challenges look like in individual cells. The baker’s yeast S. cerevisiae is a well-studied model organism with distinct oscillations of its redox state over its cell cycle (Tu, Kudlicki et al. 2005), likely related to its so-called metabolic oscillations (Papagiannakis, Niebel et al. 2017). NADH and NADPH are key redox factors in central metabolism involved in these oscillations. We are interested in measuring the dynamics of NAD(P)H using its autofluorescence and have brought together the basic tools to do so. This autofluorescence is weak, though, and we’re interested in taking advantage of recent developments in the recovery of weak fluorescence signals using “content-aware image restoration” (Weigert et al., 2018) to get the most out of such measurements without killing the cells. We are looking for a student interested in performing both basic microscopy experiments and analyzing the resulting data using these modern machine learning techniques.

References

Skills required: An interest in cell biology, a love for microscopy, and/or a basic understanding of machine learning concepts are a plus.

Learning outcomes: The project introduces the student to state-of-the-art image processing, and important questions in cell biology/metabolism, and provides an opportunity for the student to improve their computational and experimental skills, as well as their ability to collaborate and present their work.

Number of hours: Students are expected to work around 10 hours per week on the project, with a minimal commitment of one semester (an intent to stay longer is a plus).

Mentoring: Two G5 graduate students will mentor the student, with, typically weekly meetings. The student is strongly encouraged to participate in all lab activities, including group meetings.

Student stipend:

Volunteer position. We will gladly support applications for support from HCRP, PRISE, and other fellowships.

Application information:

Interested students should send a short introductory email to Dr. Hekstra, describing their interests and referencing any relevant experience they already have. A resume or CV is optional.

 

 

Posted Oct 7, 2021

In Person undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Vandana Gupta’s lab, BWH

Contact information: Vandana A Gupta and Division of Genetics, Email: vgupta@research.bwh.harvard.edu, 77 Avenue Louie Pasteur, NRB-1,  Lab website: https://guptalab.bwh.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: The project will include analysis and therapeutic developments in zebrafish models for neuromuscular diseases created using CRISPR-Cas9 approach 

Skills required: No prior research experience is required. Candidate should have good organizational skills and ability to work with other members of the group. 

Learning outcomes: Research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing. Students are encouraged to present their data in lab and division meetings and contribute to manuscripts.

Number of hours: Minimum 10 hours per week

Mentoring: Lab members will provide the mentorship. Students are encouraged to attend weekly lab meetings and will have weekly mentorship meetings.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position during first semester. Summer stipend may be available.

Application information: Please email your resume to Vandana Gupta: vgupta@research.bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

Posted Oct 6, 2021

Undergraduate research opportunity, Schacter Memory Lab, Harvard University

Daniel Schacter, Psychology Department, Harvard University, https://scholar.harvard.edu/schacterlab/home

This project will use eyetracking technology to investigate the link between visual attention, memory, and imagination of the future. No prior research experience necessary.

Please apply if you are an organized, self-motivated individual with an interest in gaining research experience with the following: technical skills (running eyetracking experiments), research skills (study design, implementation, evaluation), data entry (and potentially analysis), opportunities for science presentation and writing

Students will be expected to contribute 6-8 hours per week (actual hours will vary depending on project stage). Preference will be given to students who can make a longer-term commitment (fall and spring semesters). Students who can continue into the spring semester may also have the opportunity to conduct research with older adults.

The student will be mentored by Dr. Jordana Wynn, Postdoctoral Fellow (jordanawynn.com). In addition to mentoring specific to the current project, Jordana is happy to provide general academic and career mentoring.

Funding or stipends may be available (please inquire). Students are also encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

Interested students should submit their cv, transcript, and availability to Dr. Jordana Wynn at jordanawynn@g.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate opportunity for public outreach, Dr. Warinner Lab, Anthropology Department

Dr. Christina Warinner

Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology

warinner@fas.harvard.edu

Peabody Museum 570

http://christinawarinner.com/

 

The Warinner lab at Harvard seeks an undergraduate student with an interest in graphic design to assist with the publication of new translations the Adventures in Archaeological Science coloring book. We are looking for student to assistant to help with translator correspondence, type-setting, cartoon portrait illustration, website updating, and formatting for Amazon publishing.

            http://christinawarinner.com/outreach/children/adventures-in-archaeological-science/

 

Required skills: Responsibility and attention to detail are essential. Knowledge of how to use Adobe Illustrator and InDesign are highly desired.

Learning outcomes: Engagement with scientific outreach, production of popular science outreach materials, interfacing with different stakeholders, publication-quality production of illustrations

Number of hours: up to 10 hours per week for one academic year.

Mentoring: Biweekly meetings with Dr. Warinner via Zoom, biweekly lab meetings with the entire lab group including Dr. Warinner, other undergraduate researchers, graduate students, and post-docs in the Warinner lab.

This is a paid position at regular work study rates.

Please submit your resume, a brief cover letter introducing yourself, and example of work you have done in Illustrator or InDesign to Dr. Warinner at warinner@fas.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Warinner Lab, Anthropology Department

Dr. Christina Warinner

Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology

warinner@fas.harvard.edu

Peabody Museum 570

http://christinawarinner.com/

 

The Warinner lab at Harvard uses ancient proteins to investigate past diet, animal management, and ecology.  We are seeking an undergraduate student to help on several projects that explore animal management and exploitation in the past using ZooMS – Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry.  The project involves taxonomic identification of animal products from mass spectrometry data, compilation of the identifications, and interpretation of the data to better understand what animals were present at archaeological locations.  There are multiple possible project opportunities depending on the interest of the applicant.  Projects are similar to the following publications:

 

            https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-74258-8

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S030544032030039X?via%3Dihub

 

Introductory level knowledge of biochemistry and proteins is essential.  No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcomes: interpretation of mass spectrometry data, data analysis methods, scientific writing, opportunity for laboratory skills including sample preparation for mass spectrometry

Number of hours: up to 10 hours per week for one academic year, with the opportunity to continue in the Warinner Lab.

Mentoring: training on data analysis and lab skills with Dr. Kristine Korzow Richter (lab manager for the Warinner lab), weekly meetings and regular correspondence with Dr. Richter, biweekly lab meetings with the entire lab group including Dr. Warinner, other undergraduate researcher, graduate students, and post-docs

Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP or register for a research course credit.

Please submit your resume and a brief cover letter introducing yourself to Dr. Richter at krichter@fas.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate research opportunity in virology, Nibert Lab at Harvard Medical School

Location: Laboratory of Dr. Max Nibert, Department of Microbiology, Harvard Medical School

77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115 (https://nibertlab.med.harvard.edu)

Contact: Austin Manny, graduate student (austinmanny@g.harvard.edu)

Description: The Nibert laboratory at Harvard Medical School is recruiting an undergraduate researcher to characterize a key viral enzyme, the mitovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). Mitoviruses are small RNA viruses that infect the mitochondria of fungi, plants, and possibly other organisms. They are the simplest viruses, encoding just a single protein, with a genome size of 2000-4000 bases. Mitoviruses have been found to impact the health of their hosts in certain cases. Recently, a landmark study showed that these viruses occupy a critical space in virus evolution, situated near the base of the unified phylogenetic tree of RNA viruses.

To better understand the molecular biology of mitoviruses, the Nibert lab is recruiting an undergraduate researcher to join this project. With the advice of other lab members, you will clone the RdRp gene of a plant mitovirus, express the protein in bacteria or another expression host, and purify the RdRp using a range of chromatographic methods. The purified RdRp will be used for structural determination as well as biochemical experimentation. Through this project, you will learn valuable wet lab techniques such as polymerase chain reaction, cDNA synthesis, Gibson assembly and traditional restriction enzyme cloning, bacterial transformation, protein expression and purification techniques, and structural biology and biochemistry skills. The results of this project will be important for questions of virus evolution and the molecular biology of the world’s simplest viruses.

Skills required: No laboratory skills or previous laboratory experience required; we will train in all necessary laboratory skills. Familiarity with core biological concepts will greatly help acclimate students to the research. Preference will be given to applicants that have taken introductory biology coursework (e.g., Life Sciences 1A) and have some understanding of genetic and molecular biology principles (the central dogma, the genetic code, protein translation, etc). High value is placed on enthusiasm and eagerness to learn!

Learning outcomes: Laboratory skills in molecular biology, protein biochemistry, and structural biology techniques. Research skills with devising and carrying out experiments, troubleshooting, and interpreting data. Learning and contributing to the fields of virology and evolution.

Project timeline: Undergraduate researchers are expected to spend 8-10 hours per week in lab. Length of the project is expected to be at least 6 months with opportunity to extend project in time and scope.

Mentoring: Student will be mentored by a graduate student and Dr. Nibert. The supervising graduate student will work closely with student to train, plan, and execute experiments. Student will meet biweekly with Dr. Nibert to discuss research progress, future aims, and literature in the field that is important to the project.

Funding: The laboratory does not provide direct funding. However, we highly encourage students to apply for undergraduate fellowships such as HCRP or register for course credit. The Nibert lab has a successful record of our students obtaining these fellowships with one current undergraduate researcher whose summer research was funded by the PRISE fellowship.

Contact: Interested students should email their resume to Austin Manny at austinmanny@g.harvard.edu. Please include any previous work experience and relevant coursework in biology, chemistry, genetics, statistics, etc.

 

 

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Alan Beggs Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital/ Harvard Medical School

Alan Beggs, Department of Genetics, contact Dr. Pamela Barraza, email: pamela.barraza-flores@childrens.harvard.edu, Center for Life Sciences, https://www.childrenshospital.org/research/labs/beggs-laboratory

 

We focus on the discovery and description of genes that cause congenital myopathies. The main project you would be involved with is in describing the mitochondrial involvement in SEPN1-related myopathy. We need help handling zebrafish experiments as well as other molecular biology experiments in the lab. Basic lab skills such as pipetting are preferred but not required. You will learn how to keep zebrafish husbandry and perform functional studies, as well as basic molecular biology such as RTqPCR, Western Blot and DNA sequencing. You will also be involved in the experimental design and data analysis. You will be able to take this project and present it at conferences or presentations assigned to you.

We hope to find someone that can commit to work between 10-20 hours, this is a wide range of hours, meaning we are willing to negotiate this part. You will be directly mentored by a postdoc who will guide you throughout the job. If you are interested, please apply for a HCRP or other fellowships or register for a research course credit. However, if these are not an option and you are still interested, please reach out to us to the email provided. Send your CV along with a statement with your reason for wanting to join our group and your future plans regarding research.

 

 

Sep 22, 2021

Undergraduate Research Assistant, Prof. Rifat Atun, Health Systems Innovation Lab, HSPH

Contact information:

Prof Rifat Atun, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, ratun@hsph.harvard.edu and clreddy@hsph.harvard.edu,  https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/rifat-atun

Project description and duties:

As part of the labs research outputs for the Global Collaborative for Changing Diabetes in Children (GC-CDIC), Harvard faculty, staff and graduate students are involved in a range of activities that provide opportunities for undergraduate students to advance their career aspirations and focus by gaining knowledge, skills, experience in comparative health systems and health system innovation.

The intern will gain exposure to ongoing research activities in the field of health systems and global health policy and practice. This will entail participating in team meetings, research on specific areas related to the project, preparation of documents and synthesis of research findings, and reporting of learning on a weekly basis. The activities will be designed to provide the intern with an opportunity to understand health systems research and how research is translated into policies and innovations to improve Type 1 Diabetes healthcare globally.

Skills required:

We seek a highly engaged graduate student. Competitive applicants are analytic, proactive in their learning style, able to work with diverse teams, skilled communicators, and capable in mixed methods studies and approaches of enquiry.

Learning outcomes:

Learning outcomes will differ based on the individualized plan developed for each intern, but will include, among others:

  1. Understand core elements of health systems design, architecture and function and how they differ in varied settings;
  2. Analyze the specificity of the health system in mediating the adoption and diffusion of healthcare innovation;
  3. Critically discuss the importance of systems thinking and complex systems when developing healthcare innovations and targeted interventions to improve health system performance;
  4. Understand the crucial importance of mixed methods, including systems modelling, to generate evidence in global health systems;
  5. Develop a sensitivity for how evidence is generated in public health and how such evidence informs health policy and practice for improved health outcomes;
  6. Design and present research findings to diverse audiences and stakeholders in global health and to work within a highly active and diverse team to produce rigorous research.
  7. Gain substantial experience in translating research findings and preparing and writing manuscripts, including how to submit manuscripts for publication and practical considerations for success.

Number of hours

There is flexibility in working hours. Each student will meet with the PI to discuss the interns immediate commitments, and develop an individualized plan that aligns with each students unique position and context. 

Mentoring:

Mentorship is a serious undertaking within the Research Lab, and the lab as a substantial history of mentorship. Each student will meet with the PI to discuss their career aspirations, current activities and commitments and personal goals. Other research members of the team will also be consulted to utilize team resources, experience and skills to provide an individualized mentoring experience for the intern. Finally, all interns will meet with the PI and other senior core members of the team on a weekly or sometimes bi-weekly basis, which will provide an opportunity to iteratively align and adjust the mentorship approach.

Student stipend:

Paid position.

Application information:

Email your resume to Prof Atun (ratun@hpsh.harvard.edu) and cc Dr Ché L. Reddy (clreddy@hsph.harvard.edu).  You will hear from us within 1 business day, where we will schedule a zoom call with you discuss the opportunity.

 

 

Sep 20, 2021

Clinical Research Intern, Dr. Lael Yonker Lab, Massachusetts General Hospital

Lael Yonker, MD, Pediatric Pulmonary Department, 14th Floor of Jackson Building at Massachusetts General Hospital,https://twitter.com/laelyonker?lang=en

 

The MGH Pediatric COVID-19 Biorepository is seeking an undergraduate student interested in clinical research and advancing knowledge on the immune responses in children infected with SARS-CoV-2 and associated illnesses. Our group has studied COVID-19 since the onset of the pandemic and has since shifted our focus to the effects of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in children and how antibodies persist in neonates born to individuals who received a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine during pregnancy. This student would assist our clinical research coordinator team in preparation of study materials and support clinical study visits. 

 

No prior research (clinical nor laboratory) skills required but will be helpful as an applicant.

This student will gain clinical research skills including organizing and managing study documents, assisting study visits, reviewing and extracting health information from medical records and observing patient recruitment and consenting.

 

The position is unpaid, in-person and hours are flexible and would range from 10-20 hours/week. These can flex depending on school schedules (i.e. exams/prior commitments). Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit. 

 

The student will work directly with clinical research coordinators when in the lab to learn the ropes of clinical research, and will also attend lab meetings with COVID-19 research team (includes laboratory technicians, coordinators and clinical staff).

 

Please send a resume and interest to clinical research coordinator Madeleine Burns (she/her) at mburns18@mgh.harvard.edu. She will be the primary supervisor for this student.

 

 

Sep 14, 2021

Remote/On site research opportunity – a web based virtual reality app for assessing cognitively impaired or visually impaired drivers, HMS

 

Contact information: Dr. Gang Luo, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard Medical School

 

Project description and duties: Dr. Luo’s lab has been studying driving safety in cognitively impaired or visually impaired drivers for a number of years. His studies show that conventional cognitive testing or vision testing can barely predict the driving safety. He is studying a novel virtual reality paradigm for driving fitness evaluation. Intern students are invited to join in the development of a web based virtual reality app, which can be easily accessed from any clinics. 

Skills required: Unity, JavaScript

 

Learning outcomes: Learn vision evaluation methodology, and how to conduct clinical assessment in human subjects.

 

Number of hours: The work load is about 3 months full time. Working schedule is flexible.

Mentoring: The student will be mentored by the Dr. Gang Luo, Associate Professor either in person or via Zoom.

 

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position.

 

Application information: Applicants can send their CV to Dr. Gang Luo at gang.luo@schepens.harvard.edu. Selected candidates will be interviewed.

 

 

Remote/On site research opportunity – AI app to help with accessing public transportation for visually impaired people, HMS

 

Contact information: Dr. Gang Luo, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard Medical School

 

Project description and duties: Dr. Luo’s lab is developing a smartphone app to help visually impaired and blind people access public transportation. The app, All Aboard, is designed to address the micro-navigation problem, which is also referred as the last 10-meter problem in GPS based navigation. Due to insufficient accuracy of GPS or inaccurate geolocation information of bus stops in digital maps, a small gap from the exact locations of bus stops may cause blind people miss their buses entirely. The All Aboard app can recognize bus stop signs and guide users to bus stops with auditory cues. The current app works in 10 metro cities in North America and Europe. In this project, we are planning to expand its service to more cities.

 

Skills required: TensorFlow, Python, Java, Swift, Android (At least two of the skills)

 

Learning outcomes: Learn how to train and implement neural network models in mobile computer vision app.

 

Number of hours: The work load is about 3 months full time. Working schedule is flexible.

 

Mentoring: The student will be mentored by the Dr. Gang Luo, Associate Professor, and Shrinivas Pundlik, a Harvard instructor, either in person or via zoom.

 

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position.

 

Application information: Applicants can send their CV to Dr. Gang Luo at gang.luo@schepens.harvard.edu. Selected candidates will be interviewed.

 

 

Undergraduate Clinical Research Opportunity, Brain and Eye Pain Imaging Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital

Contact information: Eric Moulton, OD PhD, Anesthesiology/Ophthalmology, eric.moulton@childrens.harvard.edu, 1 Autumn Street, Boston, MA 02215

Project description and duties: Several projects are available in our lab, each relating to neuroscience, pain-related physiology, and patient-outcomes research. We are interested in pain following surgery, and the neural mechanisms that underlie the processing of pain. Our research is conducted solely on human volunteers and patients, and our tools include functional magnetic resonance imaging, in vivo corneal microscopy, psychophysics, and psychological surveys. Your involvement will include reviewing literature, assisting with data collection and analysis, and may include assistance with drafting of manuscripts.

Skills required: Successful candidates should have a high-level of conscientiousness and burgeoning initiative. No previous experience in research is required.

Learning outcomes: Scientific writing, literature review, data analysis methods, Powerpoint presentation skills.

Number of hours: 10 hours/week minimum. Hours can be coordinated to fit the schedule of the student, and start and end dates are flexible. Recommended minimum duration of stay is 1 semester, though longer commitments are more likely to lead to significant contributions such as co-authorship on meeting abstracts and publications.

Mentoring: The student will have weekly meetings with Dr. Moulton, as well as weekly group lab meetings. These meetings may be held over Zoom or in-person, as the condition permits.

Student stipend: This is a non-paid volunteer position. 

Application information: Please email inquiries to Dr. Moulton at eric.moulton@childrens.harvard.edu

 

Sep 10, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Stoklosa, BWH

Contact information: Hanni Stoklosa, Emergency Medicine, hstoklosa@bwh.harvard.edu, virtual HEALtrafficking.org

Project description and duties: Dr. Stoklosa’s focus is on health care and trafficking, and depending on skillsets and interests, there are a variety of projects you can engage in.

Skills required: No prior research skills are required, however clear communication, writing skills, analytic skills, ability to work independently are required.

Learning outcomes: research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: these are negotiable

Mentoring: Dr. Stoklosa will be mentoring the undergraduate, meetings are flexible, and access to national/anti-trafficking research meeting opportunities will be offered.

Student stipend: this is a volunteer position.

Application information: Please submit a cover letter, CV, and writing sample to hstoklosa@bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

In-person research opportunity, Dr. Balaj, Massachusetts General Hospital 

Contact Information:  Dr. Leonora Balaj, Department of Neurosurgery
balaj.leonora@mgh.harvard.edu
Simches Research Building
185 Cambridge St., Boston, MA 02114
https://ceres.mgh.harvard.edu/pages/team-members.html 

Project description and duties: Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most aggressive malignant brain tumors with a median overall survival of only 3 months. Over the last decade, exploration of liquid biopsy in the context of brain tumors and GBM has developed rapidly. Our lab interfaces the clinic and the bench, seeking to characterize one of the subfractions of liquid biopsy, extracellular vesicles (EV), for the development of diagnostics and prognostic tools. 

Projects include:

  • Examining the effect of current therapeutic modalities on GBM derived EV populations and their role in intercellular signaling

    • Papers in progress

    • DOI: 10.1016/j.ebiom.2019.09.025

  • Designing and optimization of PCR assays for established GBM-related mutations and mutations found from prior sequencing projects for application in a CLIA-validated assay

    • Papers in progress

    • DOI: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-20-3083

    • DOI: 10.3390/cancers13061227

Skills required: Some previous basic wet lab experience is encouraged but not required. Any student that is interested is welcome to apply. 

Learning outcomes: Project dependent - may include but not limited to the following skills: 

  • Laboratory skills - various PCR methods; DNA/RNA extraction, purification, and quantification; immunofluorescence; imaging flow cytometry; cell culture

  • Research skills - literature review, study design and execution, presentation of results through figures and scientific writing

  • Students will be given the opportunity to present during weekly group meetings if their schedule allows and will be encouraged to apply for society conferences

Number of hours: The hours are negotiable and will depend on the schedule of the student. Students can work when most convenient, especially as they gain more independence in the lab. Start and end dates are flexible but it is recommended that the minimum duration of stay is 1 semester. We intend to build a long-running relationship with the student. Students that contribute significantly to the project will be included as co-authors in publications. 

Mentoring: Whenever the student is in the lab, they will meet with Dr. Balaj and discuss past data and plan future experiments. As the student gains more experience they may be able to work more independently as well as with other team members such as Dr. Batool who is a research fellow in the lab.

Student stipend: Volunteer position. We will be happy to support applications for HCRP, other external undergraduate research fellowships, and/or research course credit.

Application information: Please contact Dr. Balaj for further information with the subject line: “2021 Undergraduate Research Position.”

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Hodi Lab, DFCI

PI: F. Stephen Hodi, M.D., Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Dana 7th floor
Email: Stephen_hodi@dfci.harvard.edu  Telephone: (617) 632-5053

Project Description and Duties: Our laboratory investigates human immunology and the development of immune therapies to treat cancer.  Two primary areas of potential projects and investigation exist. 

The first is to conduct screening and functional studies utilizing samples from patients receiving immune therapy to dissect what characteristics are involved with effective treatment and resistant mechanisms to immune therapy.  This involves standard and developed techniques assessing peripheral blood and biopsied tumor tissues.  Work will include analyses of peripheral blood specimens by CyTof to determine immunologic changes and competence.  Much of the work is utilizing samples from patients receiving immune checkpoint blockade.  This work may also include computational biology analyses working with data scientists to understand novel patterns of biologic responses from the datasets generated.

The second project involved improving our understanding of the interactions of angiogenesis (new blood vessel formation) and immune regulation.  Factors that are involved in making new blood vessels suppress particular parts of the immune system.  The blood vessels are also the gatekeepers in allowing immune cells to home into the tumor microenvironment.  Through various serologic screening methods we are able to identify candidate protein targets that have the potential dual roles of promoting new blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) and at the same time suppress the immune responses against tumors.   The laboratory efforts will involve assessing such factors with the goal to develop combinatorial approaches to treat patients with cancer.  Basic techniques of immunoblotting, cell culture may be used.  In addition, working with biomedical engineers to establish and utilize in vitro 3-dimensional platforms to study the effects of these agents on immune cell trafficking across blood vessels as well as the effects on innate immunity (e.g. myeloid cells).

The students with these projects will be conducting experiments to answer these questions.  This work would include and not limited to cell culture, immune assessments including flow cytometry, CyTof, immuno-blotting, cytokine functional assays, ELISAs, ELISPOTs, computer algorithms for computational biology working with data scientists.  It would be expected that the students will be taught how to perform these techniques and learn how to conduct this work with supervision.  Depending on the interest, a student may lead a project or portion of a project.  The student may also have opportunities to present at lab meetings or other scientific conferences, and become an author on publications.

Skills required: No prior research experience is necessary.

Learning outcome:The desire is for this experience to provide a foundation for developing laboratory technical skills, scientific methods, and experimental design.  In addition, exposure to the field of immunology and immune therapy.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if it is negotiable, state so)

Understanding the schedules of students, this is flexible.  We have a variety of project opportunities where the hours and time commitment can vary while still being productive and educational.  It would be important to have some dedicated time period (e.g 3-4 hours) in order to plan and participate in experiments as part of the educational experience.

Mentoring: The student will have a PhD level staff scientist to guide, oversee, and instruct the daily activities.  The student would meet to review progress and for teaching every 1-2 weeks with the laboratory lead.

Student Stipend: A moderate stipend may be possible.  Also encouraged if interested and time permissive to consider research course credit with committed time for scientific development.

Application Information: Please feel free to email inquiries and resume if available to Dr. Hodi at Stephen_hodi@DFCI.Harvard.edu

 

 

In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Brain Disease Drug Discovery, Tang Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital

Contact information: Xin Tang, Ph.D.
Department of Neurosurgery, Boston Children’s Hospital
Location: Center for Life Sciences Building, Room CL-1803
Email:
xin.tang@childrens.harvard.edu
Tang lab webpage: https://www.childrenshospital.org/research/researchers/t/xin-tang

Project design and duties:

The Tang lab focuses on developing novel mechanism-based therapeutic approaches for treating brain diseases including neurodevelopmental disorders, epilepsy, and brain cancer. Central to our work is the capability to interpret and rewrite the logics of cell signaling in order to achieve a desired biological outcome, e.g. turning on the expression of a silenced disease risk genes or differentiating cells toward a specific fate. Previous work in the lab has established bioinformatics prediction pipelines to generate hypotheses about the key genetic factors involved in a specific biological outcome, as well as pharmacological and CRISPR-based gene regulation tools for testing such hypotheses.

We are now looking for a motivated and dedicated undergraduate student intern for the Fall semester of 2021 and beyond to assist the experimental validation of candidate transcription programs that regulate the expression of disease risk genes, or mediate the transdifferentiation of human stem cells into clinically-relevant cell types. These work will lay the foundation for further development of drug, nucleic acid, or cell therapies for treating various brain disorders. Looking beyond the first semester, there is an opportunity for long-term commitment to this project, provided that the lab is a good fit for the student. Qualified students may go on to develop an honors thesis in the lab. Students from underrepresented groups are especially encouraged to apply to this position.

Skills required: students with basic biology lab skillsets are encouraged to apply. However, no prior research experience is required. If we decide to take you in the lab, we are committed to training you on the job.

Learning outcomes: Transferable research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing, as well as cutting-edge lab skillsets such as molecular cloning, culture of human stem cells and differentiated brain cell types, CRISPR-based gene editing, CRISPR-based gene activation/inhibition, synthetic mRNA production and transfection, qPCR, immunocytochemistry, microscopy, and image analysis.

Time commitment: Students who plan to stay in the lab for longer time periods (six months or so) are preferred. It would be ideal for the student to be in the lab daily. However, flexibility is considered and can be discussed. The lab is located at the Center for Life Science (CLS) in the Longwood medical area, which is conveniently connected to the main campus through the M2 shuttle.

Mentoring: Both Dr. Tang and senior members of the Tang lab are committed to mentoring undergraduate mentees. Students are encouraged to attend lab meetings, group meetings and journal club. Dr. Tang will have biweekly meetings with students as well.

Student stipend: This is a voluntary position during the semester. Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and/or register for research course credit.

Application information: Interested candidates should email a CV to Dr. Tang at xin.tang@childrens.harvard.edu and briefly explain what their interests are.

 

 

Sep 3, 2021

Undergraduate Clinical Research Intern, MGH

Dr. Farrah Mateen, Global Neurology Research Group, Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Neurology, https://www.massgeneral.org/neurology/research/global-neurology-research-group

The Global Neurology Research Group at Massachusetts General Hospital is searching for a student intern for fall and winter 2021-2022. The GNRG conducts research both locally in the greater Boston area and in low- and middle-income countries (such as the Republic of Guinea, Tanzania, Peru, and South Africa) with the goal of improving the quality of neurological care.

The GNRG seeks a part-time student intern to help with the operational and organizational tasks involved with clinical trials for people living with multiple sclerosis as well as several retrospective research studies. Tasks for interns will include writing letters, data entry, participant recruitment, and data quality assurance. Successful candidates should be detail-oriented, organized, able to manage several tasks at once, and able to travel to the MGH campus (work will be completed in a hybrid fashion, both remotely and on-site).

Learning outcomes include research skills and scientific writing experience.

The intern will be expected to work up to 10 hours per week (flexible).

This is a great opportunity for students who want to grow their clinical research experience and learn from a dedicated mentor, Dr. Farrah Mateen. Meetings with Dr. Mateen will occur twice per week

Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

Please email inquiries along with a resume to Dylan Rice at drice2@mgh.harvard.edu by September 24, 2021. We welcome all applications.

 

 

In-person Research Opportunity, Dr. Sun’s lab, Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary/Schepens Eye Research Institute

Contact information:  Assist. Prof. Daniel Sun    daniel_sun@meei.harvard.edu
Dept. of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School
Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary/Schepens Eye Research Institute MEEI/SERI  20 Staniford Str, Boston, 02144

Project description and duties:

Dr. Sun’s focus is on glial cells, in particular astrocytes, and their role in the eye disease glaucoma.  He is interested in studying the “reactive” changes they undergo in disease and whether these changes are supportive or detrimental to the neurons they surround.  This is important because astrocytes have, for a long time, been considered unsupportive in disease, but recent studies in other parts of the CNS show that this may not be the case.  What happens in diseases of the eye?  The lab applies genetic tools in in-vivo mouse models and general cell biological techniques.

Skills required:

In-person: Ideally, mice lineage genotyping/PCR, qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, fixed tissue sectioning, western blots, confocal imaging, ocular tissue dissections.  Previous wet lab experience is a plus, but not completely necessary.

Remotely: Animal database maintenance, image analysis.

Learning outcomes:

The student will receive training for the tasks he/she is involved in (e.g., if they do not have some of the skills required).  Additional to the techniques in Skills Required, the student will also gain experience in measuring visual function in live mice using the electroretinogram (ERG), and optomotor response (OMR).

During the apprenticeship the student will learn how to work an experimental protocol, how to analyze the data, how to present and critically discuss the results, attend journal clubs, and how to collaborate in a scientific environment.

Number of hours:

It would be ideal for the student to be in the lab daily, however, flexibility is considered and can be discussed.  Negotiable.  Ideally, we would like to establish a long-term relationship with the student for 1-2 years that results in solid work on a project and inclusion in publications.

Mentoring:

The student will be mentored by Dr. Sun, who will check weekly on the student’s progress.  Additionally, Dr. Mazumder will also be in the lab and provide daily mentorship.  The student is expected to attend lab Zoom meetings, journal clubs, and discuss his/her results and present data.

Student stipend:

This is an unpaid, volunteer position.

Application information:

If interested, please direct your email with your CV/resume to:

Dr. Daniel Sun (daniel_sun@meei.harvard.edu)

 

 

Undergraduate Researcher, Dr. Artur Indzykulian Lab, Harvard Medical School
 

PI: Dr. Artur Indzykulian Lab, Harvard Medical School

Lab: Mass Eye and Ear, 243 Charles Street, Boston MA

Lab Website: https://ailab.hms.harvard.edu


Project Description:  A major limiting factor in the study of the inner ear is not the ease of collecting data, rather the speed at which the data may be analyzed. The cochlea is an intricately complex organ with thousands of specialized cells which amplify and detect sound. These cells, named hair cells after distinct extracellular bundles of microvilli, are remarkably sensitive to vibration and do not regenerate after noise trauma or drug induced cell death. A common approach to study these cells is through various imaging methodologies, which may generate large amounts of image data in 2D and 3D. Work has been proceeding in the lab to develop various deep learning analysis solutions to some of the most common image analysis tasks hearing researchers face, including detection and classification of cells, volumetric segmentation of cells, and counting and classifying organelles among others. The lab has an extensive collection of data which may be preprocessed to train these algorithms. By manually annotating these data, we train and validate deep learning algorithms which will significantly ease the analysis burden of many others in the field.

Responsibilities will largely include image processing and data annotation of 3D light and electron microscopy datasets, developing data preprocessing pipelines, training and debugging machine learning algorithms, giving progress updates, and preparing scientific documentation.

Skills Required: No skills required.

Learning Outcome: Understanding of the biology of auditory neuroscience research, data processing and coding in python, experience in deep learning for biomedical imaging, and experience in scientific writing and communication.

Hours: Hours flexible, remote work possible.

Mentoring: Mentoring largely by graduate student Chris Buswinka (G4 PhD Student, Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology Graduate Program, Harvard Medical School). Mentorship meetings as often as needed (at least once a week).

Funding: Funding for part time work (max 20hrs a week)

Applying: Email to set up a meeting with Chris Buswinka: buswinka@g.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Pediatric Surgery Research at Dr. Griggs’s lab, MGH/HMS

Contact information: Dr. Cornelia Griggs, Division of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital. cgriggs@partners.org

Project description and duties: Our program is an opportunity to work with physicians and medical students on cutting-edge clinical surgical research. In addition, students will have the opportunity for clinical shadowing in the MGH Department of Pediatric Surgery. This research program is a unique opportunity to work directly alongside talented physicians and researchers in the field. We want to develop your research and leadership skills and allow you the opportunity to create and lead innovation that will improve the lives of patients. Our research program has a strong commitment to harnessing science to advance the mission of social justice through themes around gender, socioeconomic and racial disparities, childhood obesity, gun violence prevention, the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and more.

Responsibilities include:

• Learning how to perform clinical research in pediatric surgery with physicians and medical students

• Collaborating with team members to raise awareness about pediatric public health dilemmas

• Programs development

Skills required:

• Proficiency with Microsoft Word, Excel, and Outlook. Familiarity with statistical programs such as R or STATA are a plus but not required. Video-editing and familiarity with social media and web design are a plus, but not required

• Commitment to research and public service

• Previous leadership experience and demonstrated individual initiative are key criteria that will be considered when reviewing applicants for this position

Learning outcomes: By the end of their training, the trainee should be able to:

  1. Learn how to perform cutting-edge clinical research in pediatric surgery
  2. Read papers in any major medical journal and understand the strengths and weaknesses of the study
  3. Be fluent in medical vocabulary and understand the diagnosis and treatment of common pediatric surgical conditions.
  4. Learn how to effectively engage with the public to raise awareness about gun violence prevention, childhood obesity, gender and racial inequality in medicine, and more.
  5. If warranted based on their contributions, students will be co-authors on scientific manuscripts.

Number of hours: The project will require at least 8-10 hours/week of commitment. At the same time, we recognize that students have many commitments, including studying for finals and spending time with family and friends, and we will work around the student’s schedule to make this a fun and engaging learning experience.

Mentoring: Dr. Griggs is a pediatric surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital. She graduated from Harvard College and Columbia University Medical School. She lived in Straus as a first-year and then Dunster House. She has over 7 years of experience teaching and mentoring undergraduate students, many of whom are now in medical school. She has built a team that cares deeply about the undergraduate research experience and really wants to help students achieve their dreams.

Student stipend: Volunteer position. The Laboratory does not have funds to pay student stipends, but students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships (https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities)

Application information: Please e-mail your resume/CV along with a cover letter including a brief outline of your interests, goals, and anticipated time availability to Dr. Cornelia Griggs at cgriggs@partners.org

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Investigating the role of bacterial communication in infection, Rahme Lab, MGH/HMS

 

Contact information:  Prof. Laurence Rahme (PI), Department of Surgery, Department  of Microbiology and Immunobiology
rahme@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu

Dr. Kelsey Wheeler (Postdoc)    Kwheeler5@mgh.harvard.edu

Massachusetts General Hospital
340 Thier Research Building, 50 Blossom Street, Boston, MA 02114  https://www.rahmelaboratory.org/

Project description and duties: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common opportunistic pathogen with a broad host range and the ability to cause a variety of infections, including deadly burn wound and pulmonary infections in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hospital- and ventilator-associated pneumonia, and cystic fibrosis. This pathogen is naturally antibiotic resistant, making these infections difficult to eradicate with conventional therapies and, in turn, leading to high mortality. Using model hosts and an extensive P. aeruginosa mutant library, our the Rahme laboratory investigates the molecular mechanisms that promote or restrict bacterial pathogenesis, with a goal of developing innovative therapeutics to prevent and treat severe multidrug-resistant infections. In particular, we focus on the bacterial communication (or quorum sensing, QS) systems that govern bacterial virulence and host responses to infection. Our rationale is that by treating infections with QS-targeting virulence inhibitors, rather than directly killing the pathogen, we can disarm pathogens without imposing a strong selective pressure that drives the evolution of resistance.

The Rahme laboratory seeks highly motivated undergraduate students with a keen interest in microbiology to work alongside the PI and a postdoc mentor on projects designed to better understand 1) how cross-talk of QS-regulated metabolites influences virulence in mixed bacterial communities, 2) how P. aeruginosa QS mediates antagonistic and synergistic interactions with other pathogens and, in turn, influences treatment and disease progression in polymicrobial settings, and 3) the long term consequences of QS-dependent competitive interactions between P. aeruginosa and commensal microbes for the host.

Skills required: Students with prior microbiology experience are encouraged to apply, but no prior research experience is required.

Learning outcomes: Students will begin by training directly alongside a postdoc mentor, with the goal of achieving the confidence to independently design and execute on experiments. The student will gain exposure to basic microbiology techniques (including sterile technique, preparation of solid and liquid medium, pipette use, serial dilutions, bacterial plating and culturing, and cloning), working with model hosts, designing and performing wet lab experiments, and data collection and analysis. Opportunities are available through weekly group meetings for students to gain experience with scientific presentations and writing.

Number of hours: Flexible, but ≥10 hours/week for at least one semester is preferred. Students are encouraged to work in the lab for multiple semesters.

Mentoring: The student will be co-mentored by the PI (Dr. Laurence Rahme) and a postdoctoral fellow (Dr. Kelsey Wheeler). The postdoc mentor will provide day-to-day supervision, and students will also meet with the PI regularly. The student can attend all group meetings, which are held weekly online.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer research position. Students are encouraged to apply for HCRP funding, or to enroll in research for credit.

Application information: Please send your CV and a brief statement of your research interests to Dr. Laurence Rahme (rahme@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu) and Dr. Kelsey Wheeler (kwheeler5@mgh.harvard.edu), with the subject line “2021 Undergraduate Research Position”.

 

 

Aug 31, 2021

Analysis of whole-embryo microscopy datasets, Extavour Lab, OEB/MCB

Contact information: PI name and department, contact information, location, lab website

Dr. Casssandra Extavour, OEB/MCB, BioLabs 2nd floor, lab website: www.extavourlab.com

Project description and duties:

We are looking for undergraduate students to help with analysis of whole-embryo (in toto), multi-day light-sheet microscopy datasets. This work will contribute to a project addressing how cells in the initial stages of embryogenesis divide and spatially organize themselves to set up the adult body plan in Parhyale hawaiensis, a species of marine crustacean. We are particularly interested in the relationships among cell lineage and the morphogenetic processes of cell division dynamics, cell shape, and cell rearrangement that contribute to compartmentalizing the outermost tissue layer of Parhyale embryos. Students will be responsible for tracking cells in these image datasets and taking note of what they observe as they do this. This is a great opportunity for visual/spatial thinkers who are interested in developmental biology, animal morphogenesis, or microscopy. Through participation in our lab, students will also become familiar with a wide range of other topics and experimental approaches in developmental biology, cell biology, molecular biology, genetics, zoology, and evolutionary biology.

Skills required:

Must have strong time management, communication, and note-taking skills. No prior research experience required, but familiarity with cell/developmental biology and/or experience with computational image analysis is a plus.

Learning outcomes:

Students will learn how to work with multi-dimensional image datasets as well as hone fundamental research skills such as how to observe, keeping a proper lab notebook, and how to communicate their work.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project:

10 hours/week minimum. One semester minimum, with strong preference for those who can continue on for two or more. Possibility for eventually developing a more individualized project.

Mentoring:

Students will be mentored by a graduate student, Beatrice Steinert, with regular check-ins with Dr. Extavour. Must be able to attend weekly lab meetings (Mondays at noon).

Student stipend:

Volunteer position. We are happy to support applications for the HCRP or other fellowship opportunities.

Application information:

Please email Beatrice Steinert (bsteinert@g.harvard.edu) with a short introductory paragraph, including your interest the project, and your CV.

 

 

Aug 30, 2021

Microbiome and Cancer Immunotherapy Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Kasper Lab, HMS

PI: Dennis Kasper, NRB 1058, https://kasperlab.hms.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: We are looking for a highly motivated undergraduate student who is curious about how the gut microbiome may be impacting cancer immunotherapy outcomes. The project at hand will use immunologic and mouse surgical techniques to assess how different gut commensal bacteria interact with the immune system. We are looking for students to aide in the surgical procedure and subsequent harvesting of tissues.  No prior research experience is required,  but the student must be interested in animal work and willing to learn.

Learning outcomes: Student will gain exposure to a variety of essential laboratory techniques such as sterile technique, mouse handling, tissue harvesting, and flow cytometry data analysis. Most importantly, students will be taught critical thinking and introduced to key microbiology and immunology concepts.

Time commitment: Student are expected to work for at least two hours a day, two or three times a week. Please note this will all be in the medical campus.

Mentoring: A third-year graduate student with mentoring experience will be directly advising you and welcoming you into the dynamics of the laboratory. Students are encouraged to attend lab meetings if time permits. Expect to receive active but flexible mentoring depending on your needs, goals, and time availability.

Funds available: This is primarily a volunteer position, but students are encouraged and will receive guidance to apply to undergraduate research fellowships.

Application: Please email a CV or resume with a short description of your previous research experience (if any) or relevant coursework and why you would be excited to join this project to Daniela Coronado (dcoronado@g.harvard.edu) with the subject line “Undergraduate Research Application”. Students are welcome to meet with members of the lab before committing to this position.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Gabriel Kreiman Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital and HMS

Contact information: Dr. Gabriel Kreiman (gabriel.kreiman@tch.harvard.edu), Program in Biophysics and Neuroscience at Harvard, lab website: http://klab.tch.harvard.edu/index.html#sthash.ctRp1Sch.m5g73d0h.dpbs

Project description and duties:

Project description: We experience the world continuously but remember it as a set of discrete events that bind together the “where”, “when”, and “what” of episodic memory. This segmentation of continuous experience is thought to be facilitated by the detection of cognitive boundaries. In our recent publication, at single cell level, we report neurons in the human medial temporal lobe that respond to different cognitive boundaries (cuts to related/unrelated events) embedded in the video clips. This project aims to further investigate the neural signatures of boundary detection at the neural population level (i.e., inter-regional interactions and directionality) by analyzing local field potential signals and revealing their connection with subjects’ subsequent memory performance. The outcomes of this project will strengthen our understanding of the episodic memory system in humans.

Related publication: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.01.16.426538v1

Duties: The undergraduate research assistant will work on

            (1) reviewing relevant literature

            (2) assisting in data organization and preliminary processing

            (3) applying analysis of inter-regional interactions (e.g., phase locking values) and directionality (e.g., phase slope indexing and Granger Causality) on the preprocessed dataset under the mentors’ guidance

      

Skills required: Previous experience in signal processing skills is preferred but not required. Any students interested in this project is welcome to apply.

Learning outcomes: Student will gain experience in intracranial electrophysiological recordings in humans, including single preprocessing, data analysis, and soft skills in presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Hours are negotiable. 8-hour minimum commitment per week is preferred.

Mentoring: A postdoc (Dr. Jie Zheng) will mentor the student daily with the PI’s support. The student is also encouraged to participate in all lab activities, including group meetings.

Student stipend: Volunteer position. We will be glad to support applications for the HCRP and other fellowship program.

Application information: Please send a short introductory email to Dr. Gabriel Kreiman (gabriel.kreiman@tch.harvard.edu) and Dr. Jie Zheng (jie.zheng@childrens.harvard.edu) describing your interests and referencing any research experience you already have. A resume or CV is optional.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Gabriel Kreiman Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital and HMS

Contact information: Dr. Gabriel Kreiman (gabriel.kreiman@tch.harvard.edu), Program in Biophysics and Neuroscience at Harvard, lab website: http://klab.tch.harvard.edu/index.html#sthash.ctRp1Sch.m5g73d0h.dpbs

Project description and duties:

Project description: Single cell recording has been widely used in studying human brain functions. Sorting out spike activity from recording and classifying them as appropriate cell groups are the critical steps before further analyses. The previous study has shown that, during the heartbeat, the brain pulsates and recording electrodes move, which affects the spike waveform leading to over-classification of cell groups. In this project, we aim to overcome this problem by calibrating the spike activity with simultaneously recorded electrocardiogram (EKG) signals. The outcomes of this project will help better classify single cell activity and achieve better signal quality in human single cell recording.

Related publication: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211124720301881

Duties: The undergraduate research assistant will work on

            (1) reviewing relevant literature

            (2) assisting in data organization and preliminary processing

            (3) calibrating the modulation introduced by cardiac cycles for better spike sorting outcomes

Skills required: Previous experience in signal processing skills is preferred but not required. Any students interested in this project is welcome to apply.

Learning outcomes: Student will gain experience in single unit recording in humans, including spike sorting, signal processing, data analysis, and soft skills in presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Hours are negotiable. 5-hour minimum commitment per week is preferred.

Mentoring: A postdoc (Dr. Jie Zheng) will mentor the student daily with the PI’s support. The student is also encouraged to participate in all lab activities, including group meetings.

Student stipend: Volunteer position. We will strongly support applications for support from HCRP and other fellowship program.

Application information: Please send a short introductory email to Dr. Gabriel Kreiman (gabriel.kreiman@tch.harvard.edu) and Dr. Jie Zheng (jie.zheng@childrens.harvard.edu) describing your interests and referencing any research experience you already have. A resume or CV is optional.

 

 

Aug 26, 2021

Computational embryology, remote or in person, Megason lab, HMS

Contact information: Sean Megason, Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School. 200 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA. megason@hms.harvard.edu . www.digitalfish.org

Project description and duties: As part of the Digital Fish Project, we have recently initiated development of a software library called Goo for computational simulation of cells and tissues. Cells use genetic components such as transcription factors and secreted signals to communicate and compute information but they are not abstract computational agents. Rather, they are real physical objects and as such are subject to physical forces such as adhesion, pressure, and tension. We believe that to establish a predictive framework for understanding how cells work together to create patterns and shapes, it is essential to create a simulation environment that captures both the molecular biology and physics of cells. Goo is a Python based extension to the popular open source animation software Blender. Our plan is to extend the rich physics simulation and GUI of Blender to allow for cell based simulation of tissues and embryos. Potential projects include simulating epithelial morphogenesis, pattern formation, and embryonic growth.

Skills required: Students should be comfortable with computer programing (ideally in Python) and enjoy geometry and biology.

Learning outcomes: Students will develop skills in software engineering, computational geometry, cell biology and embryology as well as in scientific communication. Projects can be collaborative if desired.

Number of hours: Flexible

Mentoring: Student’s will be mentored by the PI, Sean Megason via weekly in person or Zoom meetings. Students should also attend lab meetings.

Student stipend: Stipends are available

Application information: Please email you resume and a statement of interest to Prof. Megason at megason@hms.harvard.edu .

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in MRI-guided Focused Ultrasound Brain Therapy, BWH

Contact information: Dr. Nathan McDannold (njm@bwh@harvard.edu), Focused Ultrasound Laboratory, Department of Radiology, BWH/HMS – 221 Longwood Avenue, EBRC 521, Boston, MA 02115. Website: https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/fuslab/home

Project description and duties: Dr. McDannold’s lab investigates the use of ultrasound energy to non-invasively treat a range of medical disorders, with a particular interest in neurological disorders. Ongoing projects include localized nonthermal ablation of neural tissue1, and localized, transient opening of the blood-brain barrier for therapeutic delivery2,3, including applications for neuromodulation4 and immunotherapy5.

We are seeking 1-3 interested and motivated undergraduate research assistants to join our team. A variety of projects (experimental, data analysis and programming) are available, and can be tailored to the students’ specific research interests. In addition to their individual projects, student will have the opportunity to observe ongoing preclinical and clinical studies in our lab.

[1] Peng, C., Sun, T., Vykhodtseva, N., Power, C., Zhang, Y., Mcdannold, N. and Porter, T., 2019. Intracranial non-thermal ablation mediated by transcranial focused ultrasound and phase-shift nanoemulsions. Ultrasound in medicine & biology, 45(8), pp.2104-2117.
[2] McDannold, N., Zhang, Y., Supko, J.G., Power, C., Sun, T., Peng, C., Vykhodtseva, N., Golby, A.J. and Reardon, D.A., 2019. Acoustic feedback enables safe and reliable carboplatin delivery across the blood-brain barrier with a clinical focused ultrasound system and improves survival in a rat glioma model. Theranostics, 9(21), p.6284.
[3] Aryal, M., Papademetriou, I., Zhang, Y.Z., Power, C., McDannold, N. and Porter, T., 2019. MRI monitoring and quantification of ultrasound-mediated delivery of liposomes dually Labeled with gadolinium and fluorophore through the blood-brain barrier. Ultrasound in medicine & biology, 45(7), pp.1733-1742.
[4] Todd, N., Zhang, Y., Power, C., Becerra, L., Borsook, D., Livingstone, M. and McDannold, N., 2019. Modulation of brain function by targeted delivery of GABA through the disrupted blood-brain barrier. Neuroimage, 189, pp.267-275.
[5] Sun, T., Shi, Q., Zhang, Y., Power, C., Hoesch, C., Antonelli, S., Schroeder, M.K., Caldarone, B.J., Taudte, N., Schenk, M. and Hettmann, T., 2021. Focused ultrasound with anti-pGlu3 Aβ enhances efficacy in Alzheimer's disease-like mice via recruitment of peripheral immune cells. Journal of Controlled Release, 336, pp.443-456.

Skills required: Students at any stage of their degree, with a background in Engineering, Physics, Biology, Chemistry, or Computer Science, are encouraged to apply. Prior research experience is beneficial, but not necessary.

Learning outcomes: At the end of their projects, students will have developed valuable research skills. Examples include experience working with small animal models, study design and implementation, medical image and acoustic data analysis, and scientific communication (presenting and writing).

Number of hours: Flexible. Projects can be completed remotely or in person, depending on the nature of the project.

Mentoring: Each student will work closely with a faculty member or postdoctoral research fellow. Students will meet with their mentors once a week on zoom or in person, and can attend weekly group meetings with the wider Focused Ultrasound Lab.

Student stipend: Term-time positions are volunteer positions, but students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit. Funding may be available for projects that extend to summer projects.

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Nathan McDannold (njm@bwh.harvard.edu), with a short description of your research interests and goals for your research experience.

 

 

Undergraduate Mycological Volunteer Opportunities at the Farlow Herbarium, OEB

Contact information: Dr. Michael Bradshaw, Harvard University Herbaria, mbradshaw@fas.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: We will be evaluating powdery mildew species collected from throughout North America. The selected students will have the opportunity to compile a comprehensive database, gain experience using microscopes and develop phylogenetic trees, and conduct lab work prepping DNA to be sequenced (PCR). Bioinformatics work that can be conducted at home is also a possibility. Please see link to my google scholars page to see relevant publications: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=NE37TfkAAAAJ&hl=en

Skills required: A background in biology or a related discipline is desirable. An interest in mycology or plant pathology is also desirable.

Learning outcomes: Research skills that will be obtained include wet lab skills, and experience with study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours:Negotiable upon hire but prefer a 6-month obligation with at least two 2-3 hour shifts per week.

Mentoring: Mentoring will be done by Michael Bradshaw. Volunteers will be expected to join weekly lab meetings.

Student stipend: Volunteer position

Application information:

Send an email of interest and resume to: Michael Bradshaw, mbradshaw@fas.Harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Neuroimaging, Dr. Wang Lab, MGH

Contact information:

Dr. Hui Wang, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School/Massachusetts General Hospital, hwang47@mgh.harvard.edu, https://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/lab/lcn

Project description and duties:

Clinical evidences have substantially extended the functional scope of cerebellum from sensorimotor control to a wide range of cognitions and emotions. However, the underlying structural basis to support the cognitive functions has not been established in human, which hampers the development of targeted therapies. The project aims to develop a multi-scale imaging framework to elucidate the neuroarchitecture and connectivity maps of the human cerebellum. The framework pivots on the fusion of high-resolution ex vivo MRI and automated serial-sectioning polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (as-PSOCT) to enable tissue samples to be interrogated from single cells to the entire brain.

The undergraduate will be responsible for segmenting our high-resolution MRI data on the cerebellum, conducting learning-based segmentation for cerebellar structures, and working with our collaborators to analyze the structural connectivity data in the cerebellum.

Skills required:

The applicants should have engineering or computer science background, with demonstrated programing experience. Familiarity with Neuroimaging is a plus, but not necessary.

Learning outcomes:

  • Learn basic neuroanatomy and neuroimaging software
  • Develop skills in using image segmentation tools and tractography analysis tools
  • Practice presentation and scientific writing skills

Number of hours:

Students are expected to work 10 hours/week in the fall semester. The start date is negotiable.

Mentoring:

Dr. Wang will mentor the undergraduate and meet with the student weekly via zoom. The student will remotely interact with research technicians and postdocs in the lab. The student is invited to attend weekly lab meeting and present the work at the end of the semester.

Student stipend:

Volunteer. Application to institutional scholarship is highly encouraged and will be supported.

Application information:

Please email a statement of interest and your CV to hwang47@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

Does the “same” protein work the same in humans and bacteria?, MCB

Contact information:

Doeke Hekstra, Dept of Molecular & Cellular Biology, and Applied Physics, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences,

doeke_hekstra@harvard.edu, Northwest Lab 311, https://hekstralab.fas.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

Proteins are like little machines. In order to function, an enzyme must proceed through a highly orchestrated set of motions. In the Hekstra lab, we're interested in using the tools of X-ray crystallography - specifically, electric-field-stimulated crystallography (EF-X) and multi-temperature crystallography (MT-X) - to understand how these motions work.

Recently, we have made some interesting findings about the mechanics of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), an important model system and drug target. We are looking for an interested undergraduate student to establish an analogous project with the human version of DHFR. You would collaborate closely with a graduate student in optimizing protein expression, purification, and crystallization. You would also be involved in project design and the interpretation of novel results.

Skills required: Experience with chromatographic methods and an understanding of basic physical chemistry and organic chemistry concepts is not essential but a plus. A computational component is optional depending on your progress and interests.

Learning outcomes: The project introduces the student to experimental lab skills which are commonly needed in biochemistry and structural biology, and improves their ability to collaborate and present their work.

Number of hours: Students are expected to work around 10 hours per week on the project, with a minimal commitment of one semester (an intent to stay longer is a plus).

Mentoring: A graduate will mentor the student daily, with, weekly meetings with the PI. The student is strongly encouraged to participate in all lab activities, including group meetings.

Student stipend:

Volunteer position. We will gladly support applications for support from HCRP, PRISE, and other fellowships.

Application information:

Interested students should send a short introductory email to Dr. Hekstra, describing their interests and referencing any relevant experience they already have. A resume or CV is optional.

 

 

Benchmarking non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, MCB

Contact information:

Doeke Hekstra, Dept of Molecular & Cellular Biology, and Applied Physics, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences,

doeke_hekstra@harvard.edu, Northwest Lab 311, https://hekstralab.fas.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

The concerted motions of amino acid residues in proteins are essential to the protein function. The Hekstra group is developing new ways to identify and understand these motions, and the patterns of internal interactions that enable them. As part of this effort, we subject crystallized proteins to large electric fields to directly push and pull on charges and image the resulting motions propagating through the protein using intense X-ray pulses. We aim to develop molecular dynamics simulations into a an important tool for the design and analysis of these experiments.

We are looking for a student with a strong interest in computational biology or chemistry to work with us on benchmarking these simulations. At present, we have developed the calculations necessary to measure charge transport and heating in protein crystals, and we would like to apply them to several realistic experimental scenarios. Follow-on research can focus on how to use computation to design and analyze experiments, how to make precise comparisons between experiment and simulation, and how to build effective models for the physics of proteins.

Reference

Hekstra DR, White KI, Socolich MA, Henning RW, Šrajer V, Ranganathan R. Electric-field-stimulated protein mechanics. Nature. 2016 Dec 15;540(7633):400-405. doi: 10.1038/nature20571. Epub 2016 Dec 7. PMID: 27926732; PMCID: PMC5730412.

Skills required: A firm grasp of basic thermodynamics and basic coding skills in scientific python are important.

Learning outcomes: The project introduces the student interested in computation or physical chemistry with an opportunity to strengthen their grasp of this area while working on a problem where there are exciting new data and their analysis of immediate interest to experimental scientists. Students get an opportunity to improve their ability to collaborate and present their work.

Number of hours: Students are expected to work around 10 hours per week on the project, with a minimal commitment of one semester (an intent to stay longer is a plus).

Mentoring: The student will meet weekly with the PI and a graduate student and can interact with them by Slack at any time. The student is strongly encouraged to participate in all lab activities, including group meetings.

Student stipend:

Volunteer position. We will gladly support applications for support from HCRP, PRISE, and other fellowships.

Application information:

Interested students should send a short introductory email to Dr. Hekstra, describing their interests and referencing any relevant experience they already have. A resume or CV is optional.

 

 

Exploring the dynamics of a cell cycle regulator by time-resolved crystallography, MCB

Contact information:

Doeke Hekstra, Dept of Molecular & Cellular Biology, and Applied Physics, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences,

doeke_hekstra@harvard.edu, Northwest Lab 311, https://hekstralab.fas.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

Controlling the cell cycle, the process by which a cell divides, is crucial for cell renewal in our body. However, when cells divide uncontrollably, cancers arise. A key regulator of cell division, the Ras protein, is often mutated in cancers and has therefore been the subject of intense biochemistry research (Parker and Mattos 2018), but we still lack enough understanding to design effective anti-cancer drugs that target Ras-based signaling. The structural dynamics, or internal motions, of the Ras proteins are of interest both for their role in better understanding the functional transitions they undergo as they perform their cellular functions (Parker, Volmar et al. 2018) and because they provide new options for the design of drugs. We have developed a time-resolved X-ray crystallography technique that lets us directly push and pull on specific charged chemical groups on protein molecules and see the resulting internal motions as they propagate through the protein using short X-ray pulses (Hekstra, White et al. 2016), and established that crystals of a Ras protein are tractable by this approach (unpublished data). We are looking for someone who is interested in learning all steps of the measurement, starting from protein and expression through measurements and computational analysis

References:

Review article: Parker JA, Mattos C. The K-Ras, N-Ras, and H-Ras Isoforms: Unique Conformational Preferences and Implications for Targeting Oncogenic Mutants. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med. 2018 Aug 1;8(8):a031427. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a031427. PMID: 29038336; PMCID: PMC6071550.

Parker JA, Volmar AY, Pavlopoulos S, Mattos C. K-Ras Populates Conformational States Differently from Its Isoform H-Ras and Oncogenic Mutant K-RasG12D. Structure. 2018 Jun 5;26(6):810-820.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.str.2018.03.018. Epub 2018 Apr 26. PMID: 29706533.

Hekstra DR, White KI, Socolich MA, Henning RW, Šrajer V, Ranganathan R. Electric-field-stimulated protein mechanics. Nature. 2016 Dec 15;540(7633):400-405. doi: 10.1038/nature20571. Epub 2016 Dec 7. PMID: 27926732; PMCID: PMC5730412.

Skills required: Experience with chromatographic methods and an understanding of basic physical chemistry and organic chemistry concepts is not essential but a real plus. The computational component is optional depending on your progress and interests.

Learning outcomes: The project introduces the student to experimental lab skills which are commonly needed in biochemistry and structural biology, and improves their ability to collaborate and present their work.

Number of hours: Students are expected to work around 10 hours per week on the project, with a minimal commitment of one semester (an intent to stay longer is a plus).

Mentoring: A graduate will mentor the student daily, with, weekly meetings with the PI. The student is strongly encouraged to participate in all lab activities, including group meetings.

Student stipend:

Volunteer position. We will gladly support applications for support from HCRP, PRISE, and other fellowships.

Application information:

Interested students should send a short introductory email to Dr. Hekstra, describing their interests and referencing any relevant experience they already have. A resume or CV is optional.

 

 

Exploring the dynamics of a cell cycle regulator by time-resolved crystallography, MCB

Contact information:

Doeke Hekstra, Dept of Molecular & Cellular Biology, and Applied Physics, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences,

doeke_hekstra@harvard.edu, Northwest Lab 311, https://hekstralab.fas.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

Controlling the cell cycle, the process by which a cell divides, is crucial for cell renewal in our body. However, when cells divide uncontrollably, cancers arise. A key regulator of cell division, the Ras protein, is often mutated in cancers and has therefore been the subject of intense biochemistry research (Parker and Mattos 2018), but we still lack enough understanding to design effective anti-cancer drugs that target Ras-based signaling. The structural dynamics, or internal motions, of the Ras proteins are of interest both for their role in better understanding the functional transitions they undergo as they perform their cellular functions (Parker, Volmar et al. 2018) and because they provide new options for the design of drugs. We have developed a time-resolved X-ray crystallography technique that lets us directly push and pull on specific charged chemical groups on protein molecules and see the resulting internal motions as they propagate through the protein using short X-ray pulses (Hekstra, White et al. 2016), and established that crystals of a Ras protein are tractable by this approach (unpublished data). We are looking for someone who is interested in learning all steps of the measurement, starting from protein and expression through measurements and computational analysis

References:

Review article: Parker JA, Mattos C. The K-Ras, N-Ras, and H-Ras Isoforms: Unique Conformational Preferences and Implications for Targeting Oncogenic Mutants. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med. 2018 Aug 1;8(8):a031427. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a031427. PMID: 29038336; PMCID: PMC6071550.

Parker JA, Volmar AY, Pavlopoulos S, Mattos C. K-Ras Populates Conformational States Differently from Its Isoform H-Ras and Oncogenic Mutant K-RasG12D. Structure. 2018 Jun 5;26(6):810-820.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.str.2018.03.018. Epub 2018 Apr 26. PMID: 29706533.

Hekstra DR, White KI, Socolich MA, Henning RW, Šrajer V, Ranganathan R. Electric-field-stimulated protein mechanics. Nature. 2016 Dec 15;540(7633):400-405. doi: 10.1038/nature20571. Epub 2016 Dec 7. PMID: 27926732; PMCID: PMC5730412.

Skills required: Experience with chromatographic methods and an understanding of basic physical chemistry and organic chemistry concepts is not essential but a real plus. The computational component is optional depending on your progress and interests.

Learning outcomes: The project introduces the student to experimental lab skills which are commonly needed in biochemistry and structural biology, and improves their ability to collaborate and present their work.

Number of hours: Students are expected to work around 10 hours per week on the project, with a minimal commitment of one semester (an intent to stay longer is a plus).

Mentoring: A graduate will mentor the student daily, with, weekly meetings with the PI. The student is strongly encouraged to participate in all lab activities, including group meetings.

Student stipend:

Volunteer position. We will gladly support applications for support from HCRP, PRISE, and other fellowships.

Application information:

Interested students should send a short introductory email to Dr. Hekstra, describing their interests and referencing any relevant experience they already have. A resume or CV is optional.

 

 

Mapping the functional transitions of proteins using DNA springs, SEAS

Contact information:

Doeke Hekstra, Dept of Molecular & Cellular Biology, and Applied Physics, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences,

doeke_hekstra@harvard.edu, Northwest Lab 311, https://hekstralab.fas.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

To perform their many functions in the human body, proteins constantly need to undergo internal motions to interconvert between different states. The nature of these motions is often hard to study. Recent work by the Zocchi group at UCLA shows that one can use double-stranded DNA springs to put force across pairs of surface sites and see an effect on protein activity. How this works on the atomic scale is not known. To address this gap, we have developed a protocol to prepare enough of these protein-DNA “chimeras” to perform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy measurements. We’d like your help with preparing such chimeras and performing and interpreting NMR studies of their structure and dynamics. The project can be extended to include a molecular dynamics simulation component if the student is interested.

Skills required: Experience with chromatographic methods and an understanding of basic physical chemistry and organic chemistry concepts is not essential but a real plus.

Learning outcomes: The project introduces the student to experimental lab skills which are commonly needed in biochemistry and molecular biology, and improves their ability to collaborate and present their work.

Number of hours: Students are expected to work around 10 hours per week on the project, with a minimal commitment of one semester (an intent to stay longer is a plus).

Mentoring: A research assistant will mentor the student daily, with, weekly meetings with the PI. The student is strongly encouraged to participate in all lab activities, including group meetings.

Student stipend:

Volunteer position. We will gladly support applications for support from HCRP, PRISE, and other fellowships.

Application information:

Interested students should send a short introductory email to Dr. Hekstra, describing their interests and referencing any relevant experience they already have. A resume or CV is optional.

 

 

Aug 24, 2021

Redox imaging of yeast physiology after gain or loss of a chromosome, Dept. MCB

Contact information:

Doeke Hekstra, Dept of Molecular & Cellular Biology, and Applied Physics, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences,

doeke_hekstra@harvard.edu, Northwest Lab 311, https://hekstralab.fas.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

The gain or loss of chromosomes (aneuploidy) presents a major challenge to the functioning of cells and is a frequent hallmark of cancers. Aneuploidy can affect both the metabolism and division of cells. Little is known about what the metabolic challenges look like in individual cells. The baker’s yeast S. cerevisiae is a well-studied model organism with distinct oscillations of its redox state over its cell cycle (Tu, Kudlicki et al. 2005), likely related to its so-called metabolic oscillations (Papagiannakis, Niebel et al. 2017). NADH and NADPH are key redox factors in central metabolism involved in these oscillations. We are interested in measuring the dynamics of NAD(P)H using its autofluorescence and have brought together the basic tools to do so. This autofluorescence is weak, though, and we’re interested in taking advantage of recent developments in the recovery of weak fluorescence signals using “content-aware image restoration” (Weigert et al., 2018) to get the most out of such measurements without killing the cells. We are looking for a student interested in performing both basic microscopy experiments and analyzing the resulting data using these modern machine learning techniques.

References

Skills required: An interest in cell biology, a love for microscopy, and/or a basic understanding of machine learning concepts are a plus.

Learning outcomes: The project introduces the student to state-of-the-art image processing, and important questions in cell biology/metabolism, and provides an opportunity for the student to improve their computational and experimental skills, as well as their ability to collaborate and present their work.

Number of hours: Students are expected to work around 10 hours per week on the project, with a minimal commitment of one semester (an intent to stay longer is a plus).

Mentoring: Two G5 graduate students will mentor the student, with, typically weekly meetings. The student is strongly encouraged to participate in all lab activities, including group meetings.

Student stipend:

Volunteer position. We will gladly support applications for support from HCRP, PRISE, and other fellowships.

Application information:

Interested students should send a short introductory email to Dr. Hekstra, describing their interests and referencing any relevant experience they already have. A resume or CV is optional.

 

 

Improving analysis of crystallographic drug screens using machine learning, Dept. MCB

Contact information:

Doeke Hekstra, Dept of Molecular & Cellular Biology, and Applied Physics, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences,

doeke_hekstra@harvard.edu,

Northwest Lab 311,

https://hekstralab.fas.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

Automated sample handling and collection of X-ray diffraction now allows for the study of the structural basis of interaction of thousands of drug fragments (building blocks for more intricate molecules) with proteins of medical interest (recent examples include the SARS-CoV-2 proteases (Gunther, Reinke et al. 2021) and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (Keedy, Hill et al. 2018)). These drug fragments often bind with low affinity, making it challenging to detect their binding with current analysis methods (Ginn 2020). Modern machine learning approaches offer a way to make more accurate comparison between crystallographic data sets, for example by generating more accurate reference data or using structured bayesian priors during processing.

References:

  • Gunther, S., et al., (2021). "X-ray screening identifies active site and allosteric inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2 main protease." Science 372(6542): 642-646.
  • Keedy, D. A., et al. (2018). "An expanded allosteric network in PTP1B by multitemperature crystallography, fragment screening, and covalent tethering." Elife 7.
  • Ginn, H. M. (2020). "Pre-clustering data sets using cluster4x improves the signal-to-noise ratio of high-throughput crystallography drug-screening analysis." Acta Crystallographica D 76: 1134-1144.

Skills required: Some coursework in (bayesian) statistics and/or machine learning is a plus.

Learning outcomes: The project introduces the student to state-of-the-art data at the interface of basic biophysics and drug design, and provides an opportunity for the student to improve their computational and statistics skills, as well as their ability to collaborate and present their work.

Number of hours: Students are expected to work around 10 hours per week on the project, with a minimal commitment of one semester (an intent to stay longer is a plus).

Mentoring: The PI or a senior postdoc will mentor the student, with, typically weekly meetings. The student is strongly encouraged to participate in all lab activities, including group meetings.

Student stipend:

Volunteer position. We will gladly support applications for support from HCRP, PRISE, and other fellowships.

Application information:

Interested students should send a short introductory email to Dr. Hekstra, describing their interests and referencing any relevant experience they already have. A resume or CV is optional.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Gunderson Personality Disorders Institute (GPDI), McLean Hospital

Contact information: Lois Choi-Kain, Director of the GPDI, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School

Email: gundersonpdi@partners.org

Location: Hybrid (remote and/or in-person); McLean Hospital Main Campus, 115 Mill

Street, Belmont, MA 02478

Website: https://www.mcleanhospital.org/profile/lois-choi-kain

Project description and duties:

Publications: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=Choi-Kain+LW%5BAuthor%5D+or+Choi-Kain+L%5BAuthor%5D

Duties: The undergraduate research assistant will work on reviewing relevant

literature to aid in data interpretation and study design. They will also assist in

data organization and preliminary analyses, and may be involved in

preparing and maintaining IRB applications for new and existing studies.

Skills required: Prior research experience and statistical skills preferred, but not required.

Learning outcomes: Undergraduate research assistants will gain experience in an academic psychiatry research group, particularly in the areas of literature review and synthesis, as well as data management and analysis. They will also be exposed to scientific writing and have the opportunity to observe presentations regarding both new research and various evidence based therapeutic modalities for treating borderline personality disorder (BPD).

Number of hours: Hours are negotiable. 5-hour minimum commitment preferred.

Mentoring: The undergraduate research assistant will participate in weekly research meetings with Dr. Choi-Kain and the entire research team. In addition to Dr. Choi-Kain, the undergraduate RA will have the opportunity to receive mentorship from the entire research team.

Student stipend: Volunteer/unpaid position.

Application information: Email your resume and a brief cover letter expressing your interest to gundersonpdi@partners.org, addressed to Grace Murray, business office manager.

 

 

Undergraduate volunteer position, Jurkunas Lab, MEEI

Primary Contact: Neha Deshpande (Neha_Deshpande@meei.harvard.edu)

Project description and duties: The Jurkunas lab are experts in Fuchs Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy (FECD) research and the first to develop a non-genetic mouse model of FECD, a disease which affects the eyesight of 4% of the US population over the age of 40 years, with a higher incidence in females. The overarching goal of the lab is to investigate the molecular mechanisms that link genetic mutations and higher female susceptibility to disease pathology.

Skills required: Previous experience in working in a lab is preferred nut not required. Students should be interested in molecular biology and animal models of disease.

Learning outcomes: Student will acquire skills in cellular and molecular biology techniques, mouse genotyping, immunohistochemistry, mouse and human tissue dissections using fine surgical skills, confocal microscopy, image analysis, study design, data analysis methods, and learn how to present research findings in a scientific manner. 

Number of hours: negotiable (unless funding through independent source requires minimum hours)

Mentoring: Students will be matched with talented postdoctoral fellows who will supervise the student. Students will meet with the lab PI during weekly lab meetings to ensure progress.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position. However, the student is encouraged to apply for stipend support from the university.

Application information: Email your resume to Ms. Neha Deshpande (Neha_Deshpande@meei.harvard.edu)

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Schacter Memory Lab, Harvard Psychology Department

Contact information: PI: Dan Schacter, Harvard Psychology Department, William James Hall, Cambridge, MA, https://schacterlab.com/

Project description and duties: This project uses a series of online studies to assess how personality affects the way we remember events from the past and imagine events in the future. How does the amount and type of detail in a remembered or imagined event vary based on personality traits? Does remembering the past or imagining the future benefit or hinder emotion regulation in different individuals? How might remembering the past and imagining the future serve different functions in daily life? In this role, you will attend lab meetings and work 10 hours/week on lab tasks. You will score written data and help to recruit online participants. There is also an opportunity to learn about neuroimaging with fMRI on a similar project if interested.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required, and we encourage applications from new undergraduate researchers.

Learning outcomes: data analysis methods, presentation skills, study design, understanding of the literature

Number of hours: Students are expected to work 10 hours/week

Mentoring: The student will be mentored by Sarah Kalinowski and can expect weekly or biweekly Zoom meetings. The student will also attend weekly lab meetings with the full research group.

Student stipend: The student may work for pay ($15/hr) or course credit.

Application information: To express interest, please email Sarah Kalinowski at skalinowski@g.harvard.edu with the subject line “Undergraduate Research Interest.”

 

Aug 23, 2021

Undergraduate Research Position, Gonzalez-Rosa Lab, MGH

Juanma González-Rosa, Cardiovascular Research Center, 149 13th Street, Charlestown

The González-Rosa Lab, located at Massachusetts General Hospital, is seeking a highly self-motivated undergraduate student to participate in ongoing molecular biology projects that aim to understand how ploidy affects regenerative capacity in various organ systems. Undergraduate students will be working part-time on these projects and would have the opportunity to observe animal husbandry techniques and learn solution preparation, tissue processing, histology, imaging, and immunohistochemistry assays. Prior experience with wet lab work is a plus but is not required.

The position could begin as soon as possible, but start dates are flexible. Interested students should be willing to commute to MGH and to commit to a minimum of 10 hours a week in the lab during the school year. Student training will be tailored to the applicant’s skill set and interests, with the aim of nurturing independence and scientific proficiency. Applicants should possess a willingness to learn new scientific techniques, experimental protocols, and the ability to work independently after training with other lab members.

In addition to developing technical lab skills, the student will have the opportunity to enhance their scientific knowledge by participating in lab meetings, journal clubs, and seminars as schedules allow. We are committed to providing a mentorship-focused research environment that will help prepare students for future careers in biomedical research. Students showing strong dedication may have the opportunity to perform an independent research project. Students who contribute significantly to a research project would be included as co-authors on publications resulting from the project. Stipends may be available through Harvard.

Please email Brittany Andrea (email below) a resume and a statement regarding your interest and motivation for joining our lab. For further questions, please contact bandrea@mgh.harvard.edu and for more information on our research, please visit https://cvrc.massgeneral.org/faculty/juan-manuel-gonzalez-rosa-phd/

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Blacklow Lab, BCMP department, HMS

Contact information:

email: stephen_blacklow@hms.harvard.edu

lab website: https://blacklow.hms.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: The Blacklow lab is seeking an undergraduate student to join our team to study how Notch signaling activates transcription of target genes. Notch signaling is a pathway critical to cell fate specification and development, and is implicated in cancer.

The project aims to identify cofactors that cooperate with the Notch transcription complex to activate transcription, using cutting-edge proximity labeling techniques. The student would be engaged in stable cell line generation, CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, molecular biology techniques, western blotting, and preparation of samples for mass spectrometry.

Skills required: Students with basic biology wet lab skills are encouraged to apply, but no prior research experience is expected or required.

Learning outcomes: The student will gain experience in designing and performing wet lab experiments (cell culture, western blotting, preparing samples for mass spectrometry analysis, etc.), and in computational analysis of large data sets. The student will also learn how to generate figures and present results.

Number of hours: The student should work in the lab at least 10 hours per week, for at least one semester. Students are encouraged to work in the lab for multiple semesters, and senior students can pursue thesis research in the lab.

Mentoring: The student will be co-mentored by Dr. Blacklow and postdoctoral fellow Dr. Julia Rogers. The student can attend all group meetings, and will meet with Drs. Blacklow and Rogers every other week.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer research position. Students are encouraged to apply for HCRP funding, or to enroll in research for credit.

Application information: Please send your CV and a brief statement of your research interests to Dr. Blacklow (stephen_blacklow@hms.harvard.edu), with the subject line “2021 Undergraduate Research Position”.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunities, Center for Engineering in Medicine and Surgery, MGH

Contact information:

Basak Uygun, PhD, MGH CEMS, buygun@mgh.harvard.edu, Lab locations: Shriners Hospitals for Children and Charlestown Navy Yard Bldg 114. https://www.massgeneral.org/surgery/cem

Project description and duties:

We are inviting undergraduate students studying biology, biomedical engineering, all pre-med and related fields to participate in the Summer Academy Program at the Center for Engineering in Medicine and Surgery (CEMS). This is an internship program to provide a diverse group of highly talented students to experience cutting edge research in an inclusive environment.

At the CEMS, research and education are tightly interwoven. Young physician- scientists and engineers who wish to devote their careers to developing innovative diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in educational fields are invited to apply. This is a great opportunity to conduct research at the CEMS under the direct supervision of our outstanding faculty.

Program is designed to provide highly talented students a chance to perform application oriented, cutting edge research while increasing their competitiveness for future education. Every intern is assigned to a post-doctoral fellow within the institute for supervision. Interns will also be expected to attend meetings and present their results at the end of internship. Opportunity to interact with other interns and scientists are available in research seminars, weekly meetings and scientific development workshops. Weekly journal club meetings will be conducted, where interns can prepare their talk on paper/topic of their interest under the supervision of fellows and give their presentations.

The CEMS focuses on a variety of research subjects including:

  • Biopreservation and transplantation
  • Organ-on-a-chip technologies
  • Tissue engineering and stem cells
  • Circulating rare cell capture technologies and cancer
  • Global health
  • Neuroscience

Skills required:

Some experience in laboratory techniques (Wet/ Dry Biology) is preferred but not required. At least 30 h per week for ≥10 weeks commitment is required.

Learning outcomes:

Research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours

At least 30 h per week for ≥10 weeks commitment is required.

Mentoring:

Students will be mentored by postdoctoral fellows, graduate students or experienced research technicians. Students are expected to attend research group meetings to present their work.

Student stipend:

The internship position is a volunteer position.

Application information:

Check our website https://www.massgeneral.org/surgery/cem/education-and-training/summer-internships to fill out the form for application. We accept applications until around Mid-February for the following summer. Alternatively, you can send your cover letter and CV as one PDF attachment to buygun@mgh.harvard.edu .

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in computational biology, Dr. Scott T. Weiss Lab, BWH and HMS

Contact information: PI name: Scott T. Weiss MD, MS  department: Medicine Harvard Medical School, contact information:scott.weiss@channing.harvard.edu cell 617 212 6909. location: Channing Division of Network Medicine, 181 Longwood Ave, Boston MA 02115, lab website: https://www.brighamandwomens.org/research/departments/channing-division-....

Info about Dr. Weiss: I am a pulmonologist whose research is on asthma and COPD. My career H index is 163. I was identified as being in the top 0.004% of biomedical researchers in the world in terms of impact during the period of 1996-2011 (Eur J Clin Invest. 2013 Dec; 43(12): 1339-65 PMID:24134636). I am currently ranked 359 in the world (number 5 at MGB) in terms of most cited investigators 2021.

Project description and duties: We have a variety of computational projects in systems biology, network science, using already available genomics and multi-omics data. The goal is to acquire practical data analysis knowledge of real-world omics data of complex disease resulting in a published scientific paper. This is an ideal research experience for an undergrad thinking about medicine as a career either as a PhD or an MD.

Skills required: students should be proficient in R programing. Python is valuable but not required

Learning outcomes: the goal of this research experience would be to acquire research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing. There is a heavy emphasis on computational analysis of existing data. The goals would be to do an analysis that could result in a publishable scientific paper.

Number of hours students are expected to work is negotiable as is the length of the project

Mentoring: We utilize a dual mentoring system with a junior and a senior mentor for the undergraduate, with mentorship zoom meetings scheduled at least weekly with both mentors, and the student is required to attend research group zoom meetings which occur one hour/week. We have sent over 100 undergrads, research assistants and lab techs to medical school or graduate school over a 43-year period. I have trained 51 investigators; 13 of whom have reached the rank of professor, and most of my trainees remain in academic medicine. I currently co-lead an NHLBI T-32 training grant and have mentored over 20 K grant (K08, K01, K25 K23 and K99/R00) awardees.

Student stipend: During the academic year there are no stipends, the position is volunteer but full-time summer positions in the lab come with a stipend.

Application information: Email your resume, interests and career goals to Dr. Weiss at the email address above.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Bioengineering | Dr. Melero-Martin Lab, Boston Children's Hospital | Harvard Medical School | Harvard Stem Cell Institute

 

Contact information:

Juan Melero-Martin, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Surgery

Endowed Chair in Cardiac Surgery

Department of Cardiac Surgery

Boston Children's Hospital

Harvard Medical School

Ph: (+1) 617-919-3072

Lab website: meleromartinlab.com

 

Project description and duties:

The Melero-Martin laboratory seeks highly motivated undergraduate students to join a dynamic group of investigators. We investigate how vascular networks are formed from pluripotent stem cells and seek to develop novel approaches to therapeutic vascularization and tissue regeneration. We are working on the following projects:

 

Project 1 – Vascular niche bioengineering for human bone regeneration. Goal: to elucidate the mechanisms by which blood vessels regulate the osteogenic activity of human mesenchymal stem cells and to develop new therapeutic strategies to regenerate bone.

 

Project 2 – Enhancing endothelial cell engraftment via transplantation of exogenous mitochondria. Goal: To dissect the mechanism by which mitochondria transfer renders cytoprotection in endothelial cells and to elucidate the role of autophagy and mitophagy upon the transfer of mitochondria.

 

Project 3 – Regulation of endothelial cell specification. Goal: To dissect the activity of the transcription factor ETV2 to drive endothelial cell specification in human pluripotent stem cells.

 

Project 4 – Vascular networks genetically engineered for protein drug delivery. Goal: To establish the feasibility of using bioengineered drug-secreting vascular networks to treat a clotting deficiency.

All work will involve human stem cell culture, molecular biology, and mouse xenograft models.

 

Background reading

Human endothelial colony-forming cells serve as trophic mediators for mesenchymal stem cell engraftment via paracrine signaling. Lin RZ, Moreno-Luna R, Li D, Jaminet SCS, Greene AK, Melero-Martin JM. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2014; 111(28):10137-10142.

Host non-inflammatory neutrophils mediate the engraftment of bioengineered vascular networks. Lin RZ, Lee CN, Moreno-Luna R, Neumeyer J, Piekarski B, Zhou P, Moses MA, Sachdev M, Pu WT, Emani S, Melero-Martin JM. Nat Biomed Eng 2017; 1(6):0081.

Robust differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into endothelial cells via temporal modulation of ETV2 with modified mRNA. Wang K, Lin RZ, Hong X, Ng AH, Lee CN, Neumeyer J, Wang G, Wang X, Ma M, Pu WT, Church GM, Melero-Martin JM. Sci Adv 2020; 6, eaba7606

Bioengineering hemophilia A-specific microvascular grafts for delivery of full-length factor VIII into the bloodstream. Neumeyer J, Lin RZ, Wang K, Hong X, Hua T, Croteau SE, Neufeld EJ, Melero-Martin JM. Blood Adv 2019; 3(24):4166-4176

 

 

Skills required:

Excellent communication and organizational skills

Strong interest in regenerative medicine

Experience with cell culture, molecular biology is desirable

 

Learning outcomes:

The student will gain valuable research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

 

The number of hours:

Flexible and negotiable

 

Mentoring:

A senior postdoctoral fellow or Instructor will mentor each undergraduate student. Students can attend our weekly group lab meetings. In addition, students will have one-on-one sessions with the PI every two weeks.

 

Student stipend:

Can the research group pay a stipend to the student? State if the position is a paid position or a volunteer position.

 

Application information:

Applicants should send a CV, a brief statement of interest, and contact information for two references to Dr. Melero-Martin (meleromartinlabopportunities@gmail.com).

 

 

Experimental Therapeutics and Molecular Imaging In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Tannous Lab, MGH/HMS

Contact information:   Bakhos A Tannous, PhD
Experimental Therapeutics and Molecular Imaging Laboratory,
Department of Neurology and Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology,
Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) / Harvard Medical School (HMS),
Location: 149 13th Street, Boston, MA 02129
Contact information: bakhos_tannous@hms.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: Tannous focus on developing novel imaging, diagnostics and therapeutic strategies for brain tumors, by the combination of gene/cell/drug therapies.

The current project involves the olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), a special type of glia that migrate from the peripheral nervous system to the central nervous system (CNS), critical process for the development of the olfactory system and axonal extension after injury in neural regeneration. Because of their ability to migrate to the injury site and anti-inflammatory properties, OECs were tested against different neurological pathologies, but were never studied in the context of cancer.

We evaluated OEC tropism to gliomas and their potential as a "Trojan horse" to deliver therapeutic transgenes through the nasal pathway, their natural route to CNS. OECs were purified from the mouse olfactory bulb and engineered to express a fusion protein between cytosine deaminase and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CU), which convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into cytotoxic metabolite 5-fluorouracil, leading to a bystander killing of tumor cells. These cells were injected into the nasal cavity of mice bearing glioblastoma tumors and OEC-mediated gene therapy. We show for the first time that autologous transplantation of OECs can target and deliver therapeutic transgenes to brain tumors upon the intranasal delivery, the natural route of OECs to the CNS, a minimally invasive approach that could be extended to other types of brain cancer.

The aim of this project is to find new ways in using OECs as next-generation cell/gene therapies where current modalities fall short. The candidate will perform a plethora of cellular and molecular biology techniques work on-site and is expected to adhere to all COVID safety rules. The student will learn how to handle cells, media or other biofluids, load cells with therapeutic agents, and expose them to reporter cells or cells mimicking a glioblastoma. To read more click here. https://www.tannouslab.com/research

Skills required: Students with basic biology lab skillsets are encouraged to apply, however, no prior research experience is required. Students will have the opportunity to work with senior scientists in the lab to be trained for lab techniques.

Learning outcomes: Research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing, as well as lab skillsets such as cell culture, protein engineering, protein expression and purification, qPCR, protein labeling, immunohistochemistry and working with instruments such as microscopy and flow cytometry.

Time commitment: It would be ideal for the student to be in the lab daily, however, flexibility is considered and can be discussed. Students who plan to stay in the lab for longer time periods (six months or so) are preferred.

Mentoring: Postdocs with experience mentoring students will directly advise undergraduate mentees. Dr. Tannous will have regular meetings with students as well. Students are encouraged to attend lab meetings, unit meetings and journal club.

Student stipend: This is a voluntary position. Full time work (e.g. during summer) could be compensated with stipend.

Application information: Interested candidates should email a CV to Dr. Carvalho at lacarvalho@mgh.harvard.edu and briefly explain what their interests are. Please use “2021 Undergraduate Research Opportunities” as the subject of your email.

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational and Systems Biology at Zomorrodi Lab, MGH/HMS

 

Contact information:

Ali R. Zomorrodi 

Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center

Massachusetts General Hospital for Children

44 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114

E-mail: azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu

Zomorrodi lab website

 

Project description and duties: 

Zomorrodi lab integrates biological networks, mathematical/statistical/physical models and engineering tools to develop computational mechanistic models of the microbiome and the host. These models are used to advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and to streamline the design of personalized treatments.

 

We are recruiting undergraduate researchers to work on a projects 

  1. Construct computational models of the gut microbiome using genome-scale metabolic network models in children at risk of Celiac Disease (CD). 

The goal of this project is to construct computational models of metabolism for the gut microbiota of celiac and non-celiac children and to use these models to investigate the metabolic function of the gut microbiota and its variations with diet. 

  1. Construct computational whole-body models of the human metabolism.

The goal of this project is constructing an integrated genome-scale model of human metabolism that accounts for multiple cell types. 

 

Skills required:

Having a keen interest in computational research is the only requirement and 

no mathematical or programming skills are needed. For students who are particularly interested in computational modeling or computer programming there are ample opportunities to tailor the project toward their interests. 

 

Learning outcomes

Students will learn how computational simulations and biological network models can be used to address translational problems. More broadly, students gain experience in essential research skills including data analysis, interpretation of results, presentations, and scientific writing.

 

Time commitment:

Negotiable. The PI is flexible to accommodate students’ schedules or other time demands. These projects can be extended beyond Fall upon mutual interest.

 

Mentoring: 

Students will be directly mentored by Dr. Zomorrodi and have the opportunity to (remotely) interact with other lab members and attend group meetings. Mentorship Zoom meetings are held once a week on a regular basis.  

 

Student stipend: 

These are volunteer research positions. Students are encouraged to apply for undergraduate research fellowships such as HCRP or to register for a research course credit. 

 

Application information

Interested candidates should email a CV to Dr. Zomorrodi at azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu (or ali.r.zomorrodi@gmail.com) and briefly explain what their interests are. Please use “2021 Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunities” as the subject of your email.

 

 

Undergraduate opportunity to study knee osteoarthritis in the Quantitative Musculoskeletal Imaging Group Research (Q-MIG), Radiology Dept., BWH

PI name: Jeffrey Duryea, Ph.D., Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s hospital, Boston, MA

Contact Information: jduryea@bwh.harvard.edu

Department: Radiology

Location: Department of Radiology Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis St., Boston, MA 02115

Project description and duties: The candidate will work alongside the PI, a postdoc, and a Harvard medical student using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data from one of the largest knee osteoarthritis (OA) cohorts in the world. The project will use highly efficient computer-based methods to automatically and quantitatively measure OA-related knee structures on MRI.

The overall goal of this project is to examine the impact of structural changes on loss of cartilage and worsening of knee function. The results of this study will provide new insights into the prognosis, prevention and treatment of knee OA, with the ultimate goal of facilitating the development and assessment of highly needed disease-modifying drugs for OA.

This is a multi-center collaboration. In our lab, the student will work specifically on computer assessment of bone and cartilage.

Skills required: Basic computer skills using the Windows operating system. No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcomes: The student will develop skills such as study design, data assessment and analysis methods, understanding of radiological imaging, and scientific writing. There will be opportunities for co-authorship depending on performance.

Number of hours students are expected to work: Terms and hours are negotiable. Preference will be given to students interested in working 12+ months to allow them to master techniques and produce results. During summers, students are encouraged to spend 10+ hours a week in the lab. During the school year, students are encouraged to attend lab meetings and spend time in the lab as their schedule permits.  Ideally the commitment should be at least 5 hours per week.

Mentoring: Students will work alongside the postdoc and  medical student with close proximity to the PI for day-to-day supervision and mentoring, in addition to participation in group meetings.

Does the research group provide any funds to pay a student stipend? Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit. Limited funding may be available from the lab.

Application information: Students should submit a resume and include a sentence about what their goals are in pursuing this research. Contact: jduryea@bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Research Intern, The Valera Lab, MGH

 

Contact information: Eve Valera, PhD, eve_valera@hms.harvard.edu 
Martinos Center, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129,
https://valera.martinos.org

Project description and duties: Our lab studies the impact of intimate partner violence-related brain injuries on neural, cognitive, and psychological health of women. Our current study methods include cognitive testing, balance testing, neuroimaging, psychological interviews, and other biomarkers (e.g., blood, cortisol). Lab interns are generally required to attend weekly lab meetings, attend trainings, help with data entry and coding, and collect data on a weekly basis. Historically, interns have put together poster presentations for the MGH Clinical Research Day.

Skills required: Students should be comfortable regularly talking with participants over the phone and over zoom. Interest in psychology or neuroscience is preferred. No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcomes: Lab members will learn how to conduct literature searches, screenings, and study visits. There may be opportunities for presentations and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Lab members are generally expected to commit at least 4 hours per week during the semester. During the summer, hours are flexible depending on whether the student has funding and their availability.

Mentoring: Mentorship will be provided from Dr. Eve Valera. The student may also meet with a doctoral student on the study. Lab members are expected to attend weekly lab meetings via zoom.

Student stipend: Volunteer position (unless the student obtains external funding).

Application information: Please email your information to Dr. Eve Valera at eve_valers@hms.harvard.edu.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunities – Clohessy Leukemia and Translation Lab, BIDMC

Contact information:   Sean Clohessy, Ph.D.
Department of Medicine/Division of Genetics, BIDMC/Harvard Medical School
3 Blackfan Circle, CLS424; Boston, MA 02115

Email: jclohess@bidmc.harvard.edu
Lab Website:      https://clohessylab.org/

Project description and duties:

Our lab is focused on understanding the role of nucleophosmin (NPM1) and ribosome modifications in leukemia and hematopoiesis. Projects integrate molecular and cellular biology and genetic approaches to understanding how changes to NPM1 and ribosome modification impact normal and disease hematopoiesis.

Defined projects will be created with students, and they will be expected to execute relevant experiments under the supervision and guidance of lab personnel.

Typically, projects require molecular cloning, cell culture, transfection, western blot, real-time PCR and manipulation of primary mouse cells.

Skills required:

Basic biology lab skills are desirable, however no prior research experience is required. Students will be trained in relevant laboratory techniques but will be expected to be motivated and demonstrate a strong work ethic.

 

Learning outcomes:

Students will have the opportunity to develop research skills including study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing. In addition, students will become familiar with experimental techniques, approaches and models that are frequently used to study biological relevance and gene function in hematopoietic stem cells and in leukemia.

 

Number of hours:

Time dedicated to students research project will be determined with the PI at the outset and can be flexible. However, it is generally expected that students will commit to at least 10 hours per week in the lab.

 

Mentoring:

Students will be mentored directly by the PI and will be encouraged to develop a training program that takes advantage of resources within the lab and the greater medical school.

 

Student stipend:

Undergraduate research positions within the lab are primarily volunteer positions. Students are encouraged to apply for relevant fellowship programs (HCRP, PRISE, etc.) and will be fully supported by the PI in these efforts.

 

Application information:

Motivated students should email Dr. Clohessy at jclohess@bidmc.harvard.edu with a copy of their resume/CV and a brief outline of their research interests and goals.

https://clohessylab.org/

 

 

Unraveling the neuronal circuits in the zebrafish brain, Dept. of MCB, Harvard Univ.

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Engert Lab, Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology

Contact information:  Prof. Florian Engert
The Biological Labs – Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology
16 Divinity Ave  02138 Cambridge, MA  https://www.engertlab.org

Project description and duties:

The project is part of a collaborative effort between the Engert and Lichtman Labs at Harvard and Google Connectomics with the goal to acquire, for the first time, a detailed anatomical map of the entire zebrafish brain (a small vertebrate) at the high resolution of the electron microscope. You will use research tools developed in this collaboration to reconstruct neurons in a particular brain region of the fish, the hindbrain, which is involved in a short-term memory circuit that enables fish to integrate visual information and ultimately perform the decision in which direction the fish will swim. How such memory circuits work remains an open question in neuroscience and your reconstructions will be an essential step towards answering it. The project is part of a larger research program in the Engert Lab that tackles this question from multiple angles in parallel, including with behavioral experiments, functional imaging, electrophysiology, and electron microscopy. Thus, you will have the opportunity to discuss your results in a wider functional context and learn much about state-of-the-art circuits neuroscience.

Skills required:

You will need no specific previous laboratory training or research experience, although practical and theoretical experience in the natural sciences may be helpful. We welcome explicitly applications from ALL disciplines, backgrounds, and specializations. The project will require that you can work independently and are very meticulous. The only real requirement is the availability of a personal laptop and mouse.

Learning outcomes:

In addition to being immersed in a larger research program at the cutting edge of neuroscience, you will primarily learn about data acquisition, data analysis, and experimental design. You will also have the opportunity (optional) to participate in scientific meetings and be trained in scientific presentations and scientific writing.

Number of hours

Work hours and length of the project are negotiable and flexible, and you can work remotely. Learning how to reconstruct neurons will require some initial training, therefore, we prefer students that can commit to the project for longer periods of time.

Mentoring:

You will be mentored primarily by postdocs in the lab, whose research projects you will be a part of (Gregor Schuhknecht & Mariela Petkova). Mentorship meetings will be scheduled flexibly and depending on your preferences. You will also have the option to attend weekly lab meetings, journal clubs, and meetings with Florian.

Student stipend:

The position is on a voluntary basis.

Application information:

Please send an email to Gregor Schuhknecht (gregor_schuhknecht@fas.harvard.edu

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Srivastava Lab, OEB

Contact information: Mansi Srivastava, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University. Northwest Labs 202, 52 Oxford St. http://www.srivastavalab.org/

Project description:

How did nervous systems evolve the ability to perform complex computations? What can brains do that simple nerve nets cannot? To answer these questions, we study the acoel three-banded panther worm Hofstenia miamia. Phylogenetically and anatomically, this worm is ‘intermediate’ between brainy animals and animals with diffuse nerve nets. Hofstenia has a net-like brain with a unique (and poorly understood) structure, and is capable of sophisticated predatory, mating, and other behavior. How does its net-like brain represent internal states like hunger and sex drive? How does the brain couple the activity of body-wide sheets of muscles and cilia to generate coordinated locomotion? Multiple projects are underway to study these questions, using techniques including automated behavioral tracking, pharmacological and genetic manipulations, and engineering transgenic worms for live brain imaging. Contact us to discuss specific projects.

Skills required: No lab skills or prior research experience required, although some wet lab and/or coding experience would be helpful

Learning outcomes: The undergraduate will gain research skills in

  • experimental design (for experiments at several levels of biological organization, from molecular to behavioral),
  • analysis of several kinds of biological data (genomic, behavioral, microscope imaging, etc),
  • descriptive and inferential statistics, handling and making sense of large and high-dimensional computational datasets,
  • the art of telling compelling and coherent scientific stories through presentations and scientific writing.

Number of hours students are expected to work: Flexible, but 12-15 hrs per week ideal.

Mentoring: A postdoc, Vikram Chandra, will be the undergraduate’s primary mentor in the Srivastava lab, and will initially work closely with the undergraduate in the lab. The student will have regular meetings with Dr. Chandra and Dr. Srivastava. The undergraduate will have the opportunity to attend and present their work at weekly lab meetings and journal clubs as well as relevant research conferences.

Student stipend: The lab will support students in applying for funding through various programs at Harvard such as HCRP and MCZ GUR.

Application information: Please send a current CV and a (short description of your interests to Vikram Chandra (vchandra1@fas.harvard.edu) and Mansi Srivastava (mansi@oeb.harvard.edu)

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, NOMBIT Lab, MGH

 

Contact information: Jian Kong, associate professor at Department of Psychiatry Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School.

Email: Jkong2@mgh.harvard.edu.

Location: Charlestown Navy Yard MGH campus.

Lab website: https://nombit.mgh.harvard.edu/.

 

Project description and duties: The Neuroimaging of Mind-Body Interaction and Treatment Laboratory uses neuroimaging techniques including fMRI/MRI, PET, and MEG/EEG to investigate the interaction between the mind and body and translate the findings into clinical practice. The undergraduates will assist in our ongoing studies, which currently focus on neuromodulation (brain stimulation), the placebo and nocebo effect, vagus nerve stimulation, and alternative medicine (acupuncture, mind-bod intervention) approaches for the treatment of chronic pain and subject cognitive decline.

 

To learn more about our active studies and recent publications, please visit our lab website https://nombit.mgh.harvard.edu/.

 

Skills required: We are seeking motivated, enthusiastic students. Good communication skills and computer skills are preferred.

 

Learning outcomes: The students will gain research skills such as patient screening / recruitment, data collection and analysis methods, and scientific writing. Students will learn to communicate with patients while upholding excellent research standards.

 

Number of hours: Students are expected to work a minimum 4 hours per week. The schedule is flexible. Students must commit to work for at least one semester but may continue for longer.

 

Mentoring: The PI, postdocs, and other senior staff will mentor the undergraduates. Currently Zoom lab meetings occur every morning Monday-Friday, which can be attended by the undergraduates.

 

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position.

 

Application information: Please send your resume and/or questions to Sierra Hodges, a clinical research coordinator, at sahodges@mgh.harvard.edu.

 

 

Aug 19, 2021

In-Person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Wayne Marasco Laboratory, DFCI

Contact information: PI: Wayne Marasco. Contact: Matthew Chang, matthewr_chang@dfci.harvard.edu. The lab is located in the Longwood area in DFCI’s Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology (https://marascolab.dana-farber.org/).

Project description and duties: We have a number of available projects focused on developing novel CAR T cells and checkpoint modulating antibodies for various indications. Additionally, our lab is working on identifying broadly neutralizing influenza and coronavirus antibodies. Students will be responsible for executing experiments and analyzing the results, as well as assisting other lab members to broaden their research experience.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required. Students are expected to commit to the agreed upon schedule, be well organized, have good time management skills, pay careful attention to experimental details, and have excellent communication skills. Students should also have a desire to learn and be self-motivated to carry out their projects. Completion of a general biology course is a plus.

Learning outcomes: Students in the Marasco Lab will gain hands on experience in antibody and/or CAR-T discovery, characterization, and engineering and will have a unique opportunity to contribute to projects headed towards clinical development. They will also have an opportunity to improve their research skills (experimental design and execution, data analysis) and are expected to provide updates and present during group meetings.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: Time commitments are negotiable, however we recommend 10-20 hrs/week for the academic semester and 40 hrs/week during the summer.

Mentoring: Students will work directly with a postdoc or scientist in our lab and other lab members are available for support as needed. Additional mentorship will be provided by Dr. Marasco. Students are expected to attend and present during group meetings (as their schedule allows).

Student stipend: The Marasco Lab is not able to provide stipends to students, however we are happy to support applications to available undergraduate research fellowships.

Application information: Interested students should submit a resume to Matthew Chang (matthewr_chang@dfci.harvard.edu).

 

 

 

In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Brain Disease Drug Discovery, Tang Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital

Contact information: Xin Tang, Ph.D.

Department of Neurosurgery, Boston Children’s Hospital

Location: Center for Life Sciences Building, Room CL-1803

Email: xin.tang@childrens.harvard.edu

Tang lab webpage: https://www.childrenshospital.org/research/researchers/t/xin-tang

Project design and duties:

The Tang lab focuses on developing novel mechanism-based therapeutic approaches for treating brain diseases including neurodevelopmental disorders, epilepsy, and brain cancer. Central to our work is the capability to interpret and rewrite the logics of cell signaling in order to achieve a desired biological outcome, e.g. turning on the expression of a silenced disease risk genes or differentiating cells toward a specific fate. Previous work in the lab has established bioinformatics prediction pipelines to generate hypotheses about the key genetic factors involved in a specific biological outcome, as well as pharmacological and CRISPR-based gene regulation tools for testing such hypotheses.

We are now looking for a motivated and dedicated undergraduate student intern for the Fall semester of 2021 and beyond to assist the experimental validation of candidate transcription programs that regulate the expression of disease risk genes, or mediate the transdifferentiation of human stem cells into clinically-relevant cell types. These work will lay the foundation for further development of drug, nucleic acid, or cell therapies for treating various brain disorders. Looking beyond the first semester, there is an opportunity for long-term commitment to this project, provided that the lab is a good fit for the student. Qualified students may go on to develop an honors thesis in the lab. Students from underrepresented groups are especially encouraged to apply to this position.

Skills required: students with basic biology lab skillsets are encouraged to apply. However, no prior research experience is required. If we decide to take you in the lab, we are committed to training you on the job.

Learning outcomes: Transferable research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing, as well as cutting-edge lab skillsets such as molecular cloning, culture of human stem cells and differentiated brain cell types, CRISPR-based gene editing, CRISPR-based gene activation/inhibition, synthetic mRNA production and transfection, qPCR, immunocytochemistry, microscopy, and image analysis.

Time commitment: Students who plan to stay in the lab for longer time periods (six months or so) are preferred. It would be ideal for the student to be in the lab daily. However, flexibility is considered and can be discussed. The lab is located at the Center for Life Science (CLS) in the Longwood medical area, which is conveniently connected to the main campus through the M2 shuttle.

Mentoring: Both Dr. Tang and senior members of the Tang lab are committed to mentoring undergraduate mentees. Students are encouraged to attend lab meetings, group meetings and journal club. Dr. Tang will have biweekly meetings with students as well.

Student stipend: This is a voluntary position during the semester. Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and/or register for research course credit.

Application information: Interested candidates should email a CV to Dr. Tang at xin.tang@childrens.harvard.edu and briefly explain what their interests are.

 

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cell & Gene Therapy, Church Lab, Wyss Institute

Contact information: Oliver Dodd, Church Lab, Wyss Institute 3 Blackfan Circle Boston MA, ododd@fas.harvard.edu

Project description and duties:

We are looking for a motivated undergraduate researcher to join our rapidly growing team within the Church lab at the Wyss Institute focused on engineering complex cellular therapies to address unmet medical needs across a variety of spaces. We have developed a pipeline leveraging DNA barcoding & next-generation-sequencing to perform in-vivo pooled discovery for complex cellular behaviors such as migration & trafficking. The Church lab has a history of effectively translating novel technology concepts into high-powered biotech startups focused on increasing innovation & productivity within the industry & addressing unmet needs for patients living with debilitating diseases.

Receiving direct mentorship from one of the project leads, you will assist in key research activities including the design, cloning, and testing of genetic libraries in primary human T cells. You will be trained to execute on standard project workflows including gDNA isolation, library preparation and sequencing, data analysis, and cloning and functional validation of new genetic constructs.

Skills required: We are looking for students with prior experience working in academic labs or an industry research setting. Applicants should be familiar with long-term mammalian cell culture & standard molecular biology techniques (transfection, PCR, pouring/running agarose gels, etc…).

Learning outcomes:

1) Candidate will learn to independently design and execute on experiments

2) Candidate will learn how to best communicate scientific results and integrate this information in the design of the next experiment

3) Candidate will become familiar with next generation sequencing workflows

4) Candidate will become familiar with library design & cloning techniques

Time Commitment: We are looking for students who can commit at least 10 hours per week to the project for the duration of at least the Fall semester (flexible schedule). If there is a good fit and the candidate would like to continue, there will be an opportunity to continue with the project through the Spring semester and potentially next summer.

Mentoring: Oliver Dodd (BBS program, G3) will be your primary mentor. You will meet weekly with Oliver to discuss research progress and personal learning goals. You will also have an opportunity to attend the weekly lab-wide research meetings.

Student stipend: All applicants will need to meet the Department’s eligibility requirements, we will assist successful applicants in submitting their HCRP materials.

Application information: To apply, email your resume and a quick cover letter to ododd@fas.harvard.edu.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Ciolino Lab, Mass.Eye and Ear

Contact information: Dr. Joseph B. Ciolino and Department of Ophthalmology

 Joseph_Ciolino@MEEI.HARVARD.EDU, Schepens Eye Research Institute

Project description and duties: (can include a link to published manuscripts describing the work:

Effective treatment of eye diseases is a formidable task because of the presence of ocular anatomic barriers. Current primary medical therapy involves an intensive regimen of hourly eye drops with are difficult to adhere to and can cause side effects. We have developed drug-eluting contact lenses (lenses containing therapeutic amounts of the drug) as a viable alternative to achieve sustained and safe drug release. This platform delivery technology provides continuous therapeutic levels of drug to the eye for long periods of time, thereby improving efficacy and patient comfort, eliminating the need for frequent instillations of eye drops, and reducing the treatment burden. The technology has led to several publications (e.g., Ross, Amy E., et al. "Topical sustained drug delivery to the retina with a drug-eluting contact lens." Biomaterials 217 (2019): 119285.) and has been granted a US patent. The student will assist in optimization of drug-polymer formulations, fabrication of contact lens, characterization of drug-eluting contact lens including drug flux, water content, light transmission, morphology, and biocompatibility.

Skills required: Are students expected to have any particular laboratory skills, if so which ones? If no prior research experience is required, state so to encourage applications from new undergraduate researchers.

Our research group welcomes highly motivated undergraduate students. Hands-on experience in chemistry laboratory skills is preferred. Knowledge of basic organic chemistry concept is required.

Learning outcomes: laboratory skills, research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing

The student will gain skills in the fabrication and characterization of drug-eluting contact lens. The student will learn to interpret results, evaluate data, draw relevant conclusions, and present data to the team. The student may contribute to scientific writing.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if these are negotiable, state so)

At least 6-8 hours per week for one year. These are negotiable.

Mentoring: who will be mentoring the undergraduate, how often are mentorship meetings, and can the student attend group meetings?

The student will closely work with postdoctoral fellows in our lab. The student will meet once a week for mentorship zoom meeting and can attend group zoom meeting. The student will maintain confidentiality pertaining to any generated research results or intellectual property.

Student stipend: Can the research group pay a stipend to the student?

Paid position

Application information:

Email your resume to Dr. Ciolino (joseph_ciolino@meei.harvard.edu)

 

 

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Priolo Lab, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Contact information:

Carmen Priolo, MD PhD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital

Associate Member, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

20 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA 02115

Email: carmen_priolo@dfci.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: The Priolo Laboratory is currently recruiting motivated undergraduate students to participate in translational research activities in the fields of thoracic and genitourinary oncology, cancer metabolism and metabolic imaging.

Dr. Priolo’s research program focuses on the identification of novel therapeutic targets and metabolic imaging biomarkers in mTOR-driven proliferative diseases, including kidney, prostate and lung cancer, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), and pulmonary Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).

Skills required: The undergraduate should have an interest in Medical Science, Molecular Biology, and/or Biochemistry. We seek creative and passionate team players, who will contribute to a highly interactive work environment.

Learning outcomes: The candidate will work closely with Dr. Priolo and collaborators on research projects that include mammalian cell culture, dissection of signaling pathways, RNAi, metabolomic analyses and metabolic assays, non-coding RNA, mouse models, and positron emission tomography–based imaging.

Number of hours students are expected to work: 15 hrs/week; project length is negotiable.

Mentoring: Training and mentorship will be provided by Dr. Priolo and her team. One-on-one and group meetings will occur weekly. In addition, the trainee will participate in group meetings with other labs at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the Broad Institute.  

Student stipend: The undergraduate research trainee program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital includes volunteer positions. HCRP applications are encouraged and endorsed by Dr. Priolo. 

Application information: To apply, please submit your resume to Carmen Priolo (carmen_priolo@dfci.harvard.edu), along with the name and email address of two references.

 

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dept. of Sociology, Harvard University

Contact information: Dr. Katharina Fellnhofer, Associate and Marie Curie Fellow (https://scholar.harvard.edu/katharina), Department of Sociology, William James Hall, 33 Kirkland St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, katharina_fellnhofer@fas.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: The position entails to be engaged in a research project entitled ROLLER-COASTER. The aim of this project is to investigate entrepreneurs’ and financiers’ intuition and its impact on success. The candidate will support across different project stages. For instance, conduct a literature review, perform data quality checks, preparation of presentations, etc.

Skills required: Statistic and research skills are an advantage. However, no prior research experience is required. We welcome applications from new undergraduate researchers. Due to our interdisciplinary framework (e.g. psychology, entrepreneurship, sociology) we also appreciate students with diverse backgrounds.

Learning outcomes: Research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: As a volunteering position students are not expected to work any particular amount of hours. However, we encourage only to apply with high motivation and high interest in research. A commitment to support this research project for a longer time period is preferred. High work flexibility in terms of time and place.

Mentoring: Katharina Fellnhofer will be mentoring via zoom or in person on a regular basis depending on undergraduate’s progress, student can attend research group zoom meetings.

Student stipend: This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No 882168.
However, we have not received any budget for this undergraduate position. Thus, this is an unpaid volunteer position. Additionally, we encourage to apply to Harvard fellowship. Please contact Research Advisor Dr. Babakhanyan for more information: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-contact-us)

Additional information: The study has been approved by IRB of both Harvard University and ETH Zürich.

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Katharina Fellnhofer katharina_fellnhofer@fas.harvard.edu

For more information please visit our project pages:

https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/roller-coaster or https://www.rim.eu.com/roller-coster/

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Chemical Biology and Organic Chemistry, Dr. Kim Lab, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/HMS

 

PI: Justin Kim, PhD, Cancer Biology, DFCI/HMS

Contact information: justin_kim@dfci.harvard.edu

Location: Longwood Center (360 Longwood Ave) 3rd Floor, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Lab website: https://kimlab.dana-farber.org/

 

Project description and duties:

The lab’s interests are in the exploration of molecular solutions for the treatment and imaging of cancer, development of new platforms for the identification of small molecule modulators of protein-protein interactions, and the development of new methods for protein functionalization. Students will work under the direct supervision of highly trained graduate students or postdoctoral fellows to conduct experiments in chemical biology (protein expression, purification, labeling, and kinetics studies) or synthetic chemistry (design and syntheses of chemical probes) depending on their background and interests.

 

Skills required: Students with basic biology and/or organic synthesis lab skillsets are encouraged to apply. No prior research experience is required, but knowledge of basic biology and/or organic chemistry is required.

 

Learning outcomes: Research skills such as experimental design, chemical biology/chemistry experimental techniques, data analysis methods, scientific presentation, and scientific writing.

 

Number of hours: Flexible, but usually 8-40 hours/week. Extended duration negotiable.

 

Mentoring: Students will be directly mentored by a graduate student or postdoctoral fellow in the lab. Students will also meet with the PI regularly. Students are encouraged to attend weekly lab meetings and present his/her work.

 

Student stipend: This is a voluntary position. Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for research course credit.

 

 

Aug 18, 2021

Research Opportunity in Translational Neuroscience Center, BCH

Contact information: PIs for this project are Darius Ebrahimi-Fakhari, MD, PhD and Mustafa Sahin, MD, PhD at the Department of Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School. Address: 3 Blackfan Circle, Boston, MA 02155. http://sahin-lab.org

Project description and duties: Project title: Development and Characterization of a Novel In Vivo Model of Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA) Using CRISPR/Cas9-based Knockout of wdr45 in Zebrafish.

Specific aims include A) To generate wdr45-/- zebrafish using CRISPR/Cas9 mediated introduction of early frameshifting mutations. B) To characterize wdr45-/- zebrafish on a morphological, biochemical and behavioral level.

The student will be involved in the generation of knockout zebrafish lines and will work alongside a postdoctoral research fellow to characterize this zebrafish larvae using a variety of techniques including PCR, qPCR, western blotting, immunohistochemistry, microscopy and automated analyses of motor behavior. No previous experience with handling zebrafish is required.

Skills required: Prior experience with common molecular biology techniques is preferred but not required.

Learning outcomes: The student will learn how to create and maintain genetically-modified zebrafish lines. Methods include the use of CRISPR-Cas9, stereotactic oocyte injections, genotyping and zebrafish husbandry. Basic design of experiments and statistics will be taught as well.

Number of hours: Students are expected to be involved for the duration of the project, typically 12 months. We encourage student to plan for 10-15 hours of laboratory time per week.

Mentoring: Angelica D’Amore, PhD will be the primary mentor for this project. Dr. D’Amore has extensive experience with studying zebrafish. Students are welcome to join weekly small group and lab meetings as well as departmental meeting and other educational activities.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position. Students are strongly encouraged to apply to the HCRP for funding. Please contact Dr. Anna Babakhanyan at ababakhanyan@fas.harvard.edu for more information.

Application information: Please email a current CV to Dr. D’Amore at angelica.damore@childrens.harvard.edu and to Dr. Ebrahimi-Fakhari at darius.ebrahimi-fakhari@childrens.harvard.edu.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity - Dr. Rotenberg Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital

Contact information: PI for this project is Alexander Rotenberg, Professor of Neurology, CLS, 14th floor. Boston Children’s Hospital. 3 Blackfan Circle 02155 Boston. https://brain.harvard.edu/?people=alexander-rotenberg

Project description and duties:Astrocytic Glutamate Transporter 1 (GLT-1) enhancement for the treatment of seizures in Dravet Syndrome (DS)”. Specific aims include A) To map the developmental trajectory of GLT-1 expression in Scn1a+/- mice, a transgenic model of DS, and B) to test whether recurrent seizures, or underlying genetics, lead to depressed GLT-1 expression in the mouse DS model. The student will help in the maintenance of the transgenic mouse colony and genotyping to identify heterozygous mutant mice and wildtype littermate controls for downstream protein and gene analysis.

Skills required: Basic knowledge of molecular biology techniques are appreciated but not required. Student is expected at least to learn how to genotype transgenic mice – from sample’s collection to DNA extraction and PCR experiment – and help with initial steps of GLT-1 quantification.

Learning outcomes: Student will learn how to manage and genotype a transgenic mouse colony, while obtaining basic knowledge of molecular biology techniques that can be used in several laboratories. Student will also learn how to perform some basic statistic analysis.

Number of hours/length of the project: Project is just starting, so it will be going on for at least 2 years. We encourage the student to come in at least for 10-15 hours per week.

Mentoring: Mustafa Q. Hameed, MD will be the mentor for this project. Mustafa has been working with rodents for > 5 years, characterizing neurobiological changes in both post-traumatic and genetic epilepsy. Student is welcome to join our weekly lab meetings and to actively participate.

Student stipend: Starting position is on a volunteer-base. Students are strongly encouraged to apply to HCRP (funding is contingent upon HCRP fellowship success). Please contact Dr. Anna Babakhanyan at ababakhanyan@fas.harvard.edu for more information.

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Hameed at Mustafa.hameed@childrens.harvard.edu and feel free to contact him for any information

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cardiovascular Imaging Research Center, MGH

Contact information: Vineet Raghu, PhD , vraghu@mgh.harvard.edu

Project description and duties:  Our group develops artificial intelligence methods to predict risk of age-related chronic diseases (such as cardiovascular diseases, cancers, diabetes, etc.) using medical imaging acquired during routine clinical care. We also incorporate other data sources (like genetics, behavioral data, medical history, etc.) to improve our risk estimates and to better understand the biological basis of increased risk. Some representative papers from our group include:

Predicting lung cancer risk from a chest x-ray: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32866413/

Estimating biological age from a chest x-ray: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33744131/

Predicting long-term mortality risk from a chest x-ray: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2738349

We are seeking talented undergraduate student researchers to help develop image-based machine learning models. Responsibilities would include:

  • Organizing and curating large imaging and genetic datasets to develop AI models
  • Model development and testing
  • Statistical analysis and presentation of results
  • Abstract writing and presentation

Skills required: At this time, we are seeking undergraduates with the following skills:

  • Very comfortable with Python programming
  • Some experience in developing AI/machine learning models
  • Excellent communication skills and willingness to work in a team
  • Experience with deep learning is a plus, especially using the PyTorch library
  • Experience with medical imaging and/or genetic data is a plus, but not required
  • Experience with the R programming language is a plus, but not required

Learning outcomes:

Our main goal is to train students in the process of completing a clinical research project and to develop applied artificial intelligence skills. Understanding the nuances of healthcare data and the inherent biases and difficulties in analyzing such data will be a critical component of learning as well. We expect that students will complete and submit a research abstract by the end of their second semester with our group. Some students may gain additional exposure to statistical genetics, biostatistics, and the biology of aging.

Number of Hours: We expect undergraduate students to commit to 5 hours per week during term-time, and 20 hours per week during the summer months. Hours are flexible and may vary during the course of the semester.

Student Stipend: This position is a volunteer position during term-time, but students will be expected to apply for grant funding during summer months and may be compensated by funds from the lab.

Mentoring: Students will be directly mentored by Dr. Vineet Raghu. A typical schedule involves two 30-minute one-on-one meetings per week along with an optional one-hour group meeting to understand the broad scope of AI projects in which the lab participates.

Application Information:

If you are interested in the position, please submit a resume highlighting completed computer programming and machine learning projects to vraghu@mgh.harvard.edu. Feel free to additionally highlight past research experiences and any training in genetics or statistics.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Wei Tao Lab, BWH/HMS

 

Contact information

Principal Investigator: Wei Tao, Ph.D. 

Center for Nanomedicine 

Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Address: 60 Fenwood Road, Boston, MA 02115

Phone: 857-320-9992

E-mail: wtao@bwh.harvard.edu

Website: https://scholar.harvard.edu/wtao/bioTwitter: @WeiTaoLab

 

Project description and duties

We have multiple projects ongoing and mainly aim to develop nanoparticle platforms or biomaterials for (1) mRNA delivery and gene therapy, (2) PROTACs (PROteolysis TArgeting Chimeras) delivery for in vivo application in oncology, (3) mRNA/siRNA delivery for gene therapy for cancer treatment, (4) bone regeneration and anti-aging skeleton, (5) anti-inflammatory disease (cardiovascular disease or rheumatoid arthritis) treatment, and (6) cancer immunotherapy.

 

Skills required

Major in biology, chemistry, materials science, bioengineering, or any related disciplines (juniors or seniors are preferred)

 

Learning outcomes

You will gain comprehensive training in nanomedicine, including its design, preparation and evaluation, and standard biochemistry techniques (e.g., RT-PCR, ELISA, and so on), as well as improve skills of data analysis, presenting, scientific writing, etc.; You will also be trained to write manuscripts for publication in high-impact scientific journals.

 

Number of hours

Flexible and no requirement

 

Mentoring

Project-specific postdoctoral research fellows in the research group will mentor the undergraduates.

 

Student stipend

Students are encouraged to apply for Harvard fellowships:  https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities)

 

Course credit

Another potential option for some students (typically juniors or seniors) is to conduct research for course credit.

 

How to apply

Please send your resume and inquiry to Dr. Wei Chen (Email: wchen45@bwh.harvard.edu; Senior Postdoc in the Wei Tao Lab), and cc Prof. Tao (E-mail: wtao@bwh.harvard.edu).

 

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity at the Center for Surgery and Public Health, BWH

Contact information:  Dr. Joel Weissman, PhD Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School
Deputy Director/Chief Scientific Officer, Center for Surgery and Public Health (CSPH)

jweissman@partners.org

https://csph.brighamandwomens.org/

Project description and duties: The Development and Validation of a ICD-9 to ICD-10 Crosswalk for Measuring Postoperative Surgical Outcomes in Administrative Claims Research.  Surgical outcomes research using administrative claims data requires validated algorithms using specific billing codes.  With the transition from ICD-9 to ICD-10, a crosswalk of postoperative complication diagnosis codes has not been developed and validated. We propose an analysis of postoperative outcomes in high-risk operations (pancreatectomy, liver resection, and esophagectomy) using ICD-9 and ICD-10 diagnosis codes.  This analysis will provide a valid algorithm for future administrative claims research investigating postoperative outcomes and will result in a highly publishable research paper.

The person undertaking this project will conduct reviews of scientific literature related to surgical complications, develop and implement analytic code for mapping complications, and draft a scientific manuscript describing the results of the project.

Skills required: No prior research experienced required

Learning outcomes:  Literature reviews, data analysis, scientific manuscript preparation

Number of hours:  The number of hours per week spent on this project will be variable.  We are seeking a student who is willing to bring this project to completion, preferably during the fall semester, though the project may spill over into the spring semester as well.

Mentoring: Dr. Joel Weissman (CSPH), Dr. Clancy Clark (Wake Forest Health), and Dr. Rachel Adler (CSPH) will serve as mentors.  The student will attend weekly mentoring meetings with at least one mentor.  The student is also welcome to join larger team meetings that focus on other research projects using ICD-9 and ICD-10 claims data.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position.

Application information: To apply, e-mail your resume to Dr. Rachel Adler at radler1@bwh.harvard.edu.  Please include a brief paragraph describing why you are interested in this project.

 

 

Aug 17, 2021

Undergraduate research opportunity, Viswanathan Lab, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/HMS

PI: Srinivas Viswanathan, MD, PhD, Department: Medical Oncology, DFCIs
Contact Information: Srinivas.viswanathan@dfci.harvard.edu
Location: Dana Building 15th Floor, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Lab Website: viswanathanlab.dana-farber.org

Description of the project and duties (link to published manuscripts describing the work):

The Viswanathan lab uses cutting-edge genomic and genome-scale functional genetic technologies to dissect the molecular underpinnings and vulnerabilities of cancer, with a focus on genitourinary cancers (particularly cancers of the prostate and kidney). A range of exciting undergraduate research opportunities are available in either a wet-lab or dry-lab setting. Potential areas of research include the following:

  1. Use of genome-scale functional genetic (CRISPR) screening, biochemistry, and proteomics to discover new therapeutic targets in castration-resistant prostate cancer.
  2. Genetic and drug-screening of kidney cancer models in order to identify new therapies for rare and aggressive subtypes of kidney cancer.
  3. Molecular biology and biochemistry studies to understand the basic mechanisms of tumorigenesis in genitourinary cancers.
  4. Analysis of whole genome and transcriptome sequencing data from patients with prostate and kidney cancers, including the analysis of single-cell RNA sequencing data.

A list of published manuscripts on related work can be found at the following link: https://viswanathanlab.dana-farber.org/publications.html 

Skills required:

  • For those interested in wet lab projects, prior experience or exposure to a laboratory environment is preferred.
  • For those interested in dry lab projects, facility or working familiarity with R, python, and Unix is preferred.

Learning outcome: The student will develop a broad array of research skills. Over time, the student will develop graded technical and conceptual independence related to the project, with the ability to contribute to study design, data acquisition, and data analysis. The student will have opportunities to present data in both individual meetings and group settings.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: Negotiable

Mentoring: The student will receive mentorship from postdoctoral fellows in the laboratory as well as through regular meetings with the PI.

Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and/or register for research course credit.

Please submit a brief statement of interest and your CV to Dr. Viswanathan at Srinivas.viswanathan@dfci.harvard.edu

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Multiomics using Machine Learning, Wadduwage Lab

Contact information: Dushan Wadduwage, Center for Advanced Imaging, https://wadduwagelab.com/

Project description and duties: Interested students would work in developing new machine learning algorithms to integrate data from multiple -omics datasets in the absence of paired training data. The student will be required to familiarize with different data sources and datasets, work on unsupervised dimensionality reduction algorithms, and repurpose natural-language-processing-based deep learning algorithms for multiomics.

Skills required: Interested students are required to have good programming skills in python and experience in deep-learning tools such as Pytorch, TensorFlow, or Keras.

Learning outcomes: Experience in deep-learning algorithm development, scientific writing and communication

Number of hours ~16 hours/week, negotiable

Mentoring: PI (Dushan) will be mentoring the student, weekly zoom meetings will be held.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position.

Application information: Email your resume to Dushan at wadduwage@fas.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Choudhury Lab, BCH

Contact information: Sangita Choudhury, PhD. Department of Genetics and Genomics, sangita.choudhury@childrens.harvard.edu, Center for life science, 3 black fan circle,

https://bchgenetics.org/ChoudhuryLab/

Project description and duties: Choudhury lab seeks two freshmen/sophomores for the fall semester of 2021 and beyond. In the first year, the position will involve isolating and validating cell types from the heart, liver, and muscle, quantifying ploidy in different postmortem organs, and understanding the impact of ploidy in development and diseased condition. Our lab focuses on understanding the aging and disease progression in the human heart. Projects currently being conducted by our lab members include an investigation of somatic mutational burden in the human heart during aging and diseased condition. See https://bchgenetics.org/ChoudhuryLab/ for more information on the lab and our research. Looking beyond the first year, there may be an opportunity to participate in research in the lab, and qualified students may go on to develop an honors thesis.

Skills required: Freshman and sophomore Biology majors, interested in genetics and vascular biology, are encouraged to apply. No prior research experience is required, but knowledge of basic biology, cell biology is required.

Learning outcomes: research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: Flexible

Mentoring: Post-doctoral research fellows and Research Assistants will mentor for day to days lab work, will meet biweekly with PI.

Student stipend: Volunteer Basis, Potential for HCRP Funding, Potential for Academic Credit.

Application information: Email your resume to Dr. Choudhury at sangita.choudhury@childrens.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate research opportunity, Cognitive Neuroscience Group (Dr. Yael Arbel), MGH Institute of Health Professions

Contact information: Dr. Yael Arbel, co-director Cognitive Neuroscience Group, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH IHP, 79 13th Street, Boston, MA 02129. CNGLEAD@MGHIHP.EDU; https://www.mghihp.edu/research/cognitive-neuroscience-group

Project description and duties: We are looking for a student to assist with data analysis of Eye-tracking and EEG data, and to conduct a literature review. No previous research experience is needed.

The Cognitive Neuroscience Group is a collaborative research group that uses behavioral and neuroscience methods to examine the relationship between learning, language ability, and cognitive factors. We use electrophysiological and eye tracking data to study typical and atypical learning across the lifespan and in different disorders (e.g., Developmental Language Disorder). The research assistant will have the opportunity to contribute to several research projects, including two federally funded projects focusing on the neural function associated with learning in typically developing children and children with developmental language disorders.

Duties: The research assistant will assist with data analysis of behavioral, eye-tracking, and EEG data, and will conduct a literature review related to attention and learning. EEG signal processing will include the use of MATLAB based toolboxes for artifact detection/correction, latency jitter correction, and Principal Component Analysis (PCA).

Skills required: excellent communication skills (verbal and written), background knowledge in cognitive neuroscience, ability to work independently and in a team. Preferred skills include coding in MATLAB, signal processing, eye-tracking data analysis, statistical analysis using SPSS or R, creating scripts in Excel and other programing. No research experience is required.

Learning outcome: The RA will receive training in data analysis of behavioral, EEG, and eye-tracking data. The RA will participate in weekly lab meetings that will include presentations by PIs, and students at all levels (PhD, graduate, undergraduate). The RA will gain understanding of research design related to the study of learning in individuals with typical and atypical cognitive profiles. The RA will have the opportunity to present at the biweekly CNG meetings and to participate in scientific writing

The RA is expected to work 10 hours per week on site. Our lab is located at the MGH Institute of Health Professions in the Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston.

Mentoring: The RA will be mentored by the Dr. Arbel and will interact with CNG members. The RA will attend weekly lab meetings, and weekly mentorship meetings with the PI.

Student stipend: Please apply for funding through the Harvard College Research Program (Fall deadline 9/14/21) https://uraf.harvard.edu/research-funding

 

 

Molecular Neurogenetics In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Breakefield Lab, MGH/HMS

Contact information:

Breakefield O. Xandra, PhD

Molecular Neurogenetics Unit,

Department of Neurology and Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Department of Radiology,

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) / Harvard Medical School (HMS),

Location: 149 13th Street, Boston, MA 02129

Contact information: breakefield@hms.harvard.edu

Breakefield Lab Website

Project description and duties: Research projects in the Breakefield lab focus broadly on finding new therapeutic treatments for hereditary neurological diseases such as early onset torsion dystonia (DYT1) and X-linked dystonia parkinsonism (XDP), glioblastoma, and tumor suppressor syndromes – neurofibromatosis type 1 & 2 and tuberous sclerosis type 1 & 2. For this opportunity we will focus on extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are naturally occurring enclosed nanolipid particles known for their roles in cell-cell communication in virtually all organisms. EVs have attracted strong interest for their potential use in therapeutic intervention and biomarker discovery. The aim of this project is to find new ways in using them as next-generation delivery modalities where current gene therapies vehicles such as AAV and lentivirus vectors fall short. The candidate will perform a plethora of molecular biology techniques work on-site and is expected to adhere to all COVID safety rules. The student will learn how to handle EVs from media or other biofluids, load EVs with therapeutic agents such as CRISPR modalities, and expose them to reporter cells or cells mimicking a hereditary disease. To read more click here.

Skills required: Students with basic biology lab skillsets are encouraged to apply, however, no prior research experience is required. Students will have the opportunity to work with senior scientists in the lab to be trained for lab techniques.

Learning outcomes: Research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing, as well as lab skillsets such as cell culture, protein engineering, protein expression and purification, gene editing (CRISPR), synthetic mRNA production, qPCR, NGS, protein labeling, immunohistochemistry and working with instruments such as SEC, microscopy and flow cytometry.

Time commitment: It would be ideal for the student to be in the lab daily, however, flexibility is considered and can be discussed. Students who plan to stay in the lab for longer time periods (six months or so) are preferred.

Mentoring: Postdocs with experience mentoring students will directly advise undergraduate mentees. Dr. Breakefield will have regular meetings with students as well. Students are encouraged to attend lab meetings, unit meetings and journal club.

Student stipend: This is a voluntary position. Full time work (e.g. during summer) could be compensated with stipend.

Application information: Interested candidates should email a CV to Dr. Breyne at kbreyne@mgh.harvard.edu and briefly explain what their interests are. Please use “2021 Undergraduate Research Opportunities” as the subject of your email.

 

 

Aug 16, 2021

In-person/Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Liron Bar-Peled, MGH/HMS

Contact Information: Dr. Liron Bar-Peled, lbar-peled@mgh.harvard.edu; 149 13th St. Charlestown, MA 02141; MGH Cancer Center; barpeledlab.org

Project description and duties: Dr. Bar-Peled seeks exceptionally motivated candidates who enjoy conducting research and involving themselves in the dynamic and intellectual environment of the laboratory. The laboratory studies the cellular response to altered metabolic states in multiple cancer models. Specific studies relate to discovering druggable vulnerabilities in genetically defined cancers and elucidating the mechanisms of reactive oxygen species in cancer growth using cutting edge chemical proteomic technologies. To learn more about our research visit: barpeledlab.org.  She or he will have the opportunity to become fully involved with all the steps of research being completed in our laboratory, often working directly with Dr. Bar-Peled, which will lead to numerous publications. Investigators in our laboratory will present at regular laboratory meetings. The experience gained in the lab will be very helpful for pursuing a career as a researcher or physician.

Skills required: The ideal candidate will be detail-oriented, organized, and able to work independently as well as part of a team in a fast-paced evolving environment. Excellent communication and organizational skills are necessary. Students majoring in biology, molecular biology, chemistry, or biochemistry are encouraged to apply. Candidates with a strong computational backgrounds are also encouraged to apply. Candidates with research experience in a laboratory are highly preferred, but this is not required.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Performs base-level procedures as assigned (i.e. – pipetting, tissue culture, in vitro assays, etc.)
  • Prepares proteomic samples
  • Conducts mammalian tissue culture experiments
  • Conducts molecular biology experiments (cloning, western blotting, gene-editing using CRISPR)
  • Maintains laboratory notebook
  • Understands and applies basic scientific techniques
  • Conducts analysis of results
  • Supports the research of other lab members
  • Preforms independent literature searches
  • Assists with organizing materials for publication or presentation
  • Works in an efficient manner
  • Has a high capacity for problem solving

Number of hours: 14-20 week. 2 Semester minimum requirement.

Mentoring: Dr. Bar-Peled or a highly trained member of his Team.

Student Stipend: Subject to discussion

Application information: Send a cover letter and your CV to Liron at lbar-peled@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate research using CRISPR screening to understand and treat genetic disease

Contact information: Richard Sherwood, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School Division of Genetics, rsherwood@bwh.harvard.edu, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, https://sherwoodlab.bwh.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: Our lab uses CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing and genomic screening approaches to understand gene regulation and develop treatments for genetic diseases. Students would participate in stem cell culture, precision CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing techniques, genomic analysis, and molecular biology. Our lab also has a strong computational component, so students interested in combining and experimental and computational biology may find this a particularly good fit.

Skills required: No prior experience required.

Learning outcomes: Students will learn how to conceive a novel research project and develop this idea into a project that produces definitive, well documented data. They will be encouraged to analyze data to draw biological conclusions and will follow up leads to take the research in new and interesting directions. Additional training will be provided in critical review of technical literature and in presenting work to a scientific audience.

Number of hours: Minimum of 10 hours per week, more is encouraged as is full-time summer research.

Mentoring: The student will be paired with a postdoctoral fellow or PhD student in the lab. Lab meetings and journal clubs are conducted over zoom, so the student can attend these remotely.

Student stipend: Course credit is preferred, a stipend may be possible.

Application information: Please email Dr. Sherwood at rsherwood@bwh.harvard.edu to discuss further.

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, LCN, Martinos Center, MGH

Contact information: Lilla Zöllei, PhD, Assistant Professor of Radiology, HMS
Email: lzollei@mgh.harvard.edu Phone: 617-643-7791
https://scholar.harvard.edu/lillazollei/home
A.A .Martinos Center, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129
https://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/lab/lcn

Project description and duties:

There are three projects offered. All of them are related to automated brain image analysis tools developed for the analysis of infant brain MRI images.

1. literature review: to dive into the rapidly developing vast literature for deep-learning based methods related to the tools that are currently being developed in the lab (eg.: spatial registration and cortical and subcortical labeling)

2. generation of digital material (movies, figures, plots, ...) to promote existing research work in popular science

3. manual editing and / or labeling of anatomical areas; scoring the accuracy of automated tool outcomes where ground truth data does not exist

4. testing and modifying deep learning-based tools to optimize for our specific applications

 

Sample publications that relate to the above tasks ca be found at:

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053811920304328

https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.12101

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053811920306479

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1053811919304434

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.04.27.441546v1.full

Skills required:

For the above projects, the student is expected to have a general interest in and high level curiosity for neuroscience, computational methods and / or human neurodevelopment. Particular skills per project:

1. great communication and writing skills

2. advanced knowledge of an image / video editing software and / or scientific plotting tools

3. basic knowledge of human neuroanatomy, attention to detail

4. basic understanding of deep learning methods (prior experience is highly valued)

 

Learning outcomes:

presentation skills, data analysis methods, insight into a fastly developing research area, possibility of connecting with multiple people from a diverse group of scientists

Expectations:

SUMMER / WINTER BREAK: Ideally, the student would spend 6-8 hrs / day on this project for the duration of 8 weeks.

SEMESTER WITH COURSES: Ideally, the student would spend at least 8 hrs / week on this project for the duration of the academic semester.

There is, however, flexibility in the schedule and that can be discussed between the applicant and the PI.

Mentoring:

The PI will be mentoring the undergraduate directly. There will be daily / weekly check-ins required and a minimum of 1 live / Zoom chat per week. The student will be able attend weekly research group (Zoom) meetings of the Laboratory of Computational Neuroimaging. Student stipend:

This can be a paid position. Students are also encouraged to apply for Harvard / outside fellowships.

Application information:

Email your CV and cover letter to Dr. Lilla Zöllei at lzollei@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity with Kaur Lab, BIDMC

Undergraduate Research Opportunity with Kaur Lab, at the Department of Neurology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical to support research project involving study of brain circuitry underlying waking up to pain and apnea.

Contact information: Satvinder Kaur, Department of Neurology, skaur@bidmc.harvard.edu, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center for Life Science building 7th floor, Room-707.

Project description and duties: The project involves understanding the brain circuits involved in regulating waking up to pain stimuli, and will rovide
better understanding of the central brain circuitries regulating pain and arousal; and this will pave the way for designing better non-opioidergic options that can not only block pain induced sleep-disturbances, but also help reverse tolerance to the existing analgesics. Depending on the background and interest of the student, under supervision of the principal investigator and research assistant will conduct a variety of routine experiments and will learn use of electrophysiological, optogenetics, chemogenetics, molecular and cell biology techniques to dissect various brain circuits

Published work can be perused at:

https://connects.catalyst.harvard.edu/Profiles/display/Person/86494

Skills required: Some experience in neuroscience laboratory with tissue sectioning, immunohistochemistry or mouse genotyping is preferred but is not the prerequisite. The candidate must be comfortable working with rodents and will be trained for rodent surgery. The candidate will also assist with lab related management duties

Learning outcomes: general research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing, as well as hands-on experience working with rodent models of pain and apnea.

Number of hours: Students are expected to work for the length of project and is negotiable, usually between 8-40 hours/wk. Extended duration negotiable.

Mentoring: regular (daily-weekly) meetings with research assistants, postdoctoral fellow advisors, regular (once in week) meetings with PI. Student is encouraged to attend weekly lab meetings and present his/her work.

Student stipend: Students seeking a stipend are strongly encouraged to apply for any applicable summer research fellowships at Harvard or elsewhere. Course credit: Students can also conduct research for course credit (however, a student cannot earn course credit and be paid a stipend in the same semester).

Application information: Email your resume to Dr. Satvinder Kaur at
skaur@bidmc.harvard.edu.

 

 

Cell division undergraduate research opportunity, Harvard

Contact information: Gloria Ha gloriaha@g.harvard.edu, Needleman Lab (MCB/SEAS), https://needleman.seas.harvard.edu/
Project description and duties: Research in the Needleman Lab centers around quantitative imaging and modeling of biological processes in live cells.  This project will be focused on live cell imaging and analysis of chromosome movement during cell division under different molecular perturbations.  The project can be either in-person or remote depending on the COVID situation.  If in-person, the project will involve cell culture work and live cell imaging in addition to coding and image analysis.  

Skills required: Previous experience coding in Python or MATLAB is preferred but not required.  

Learning outcomes: The student will learn experimental design, literature review, programming, image analysis, and potentially mathematical modeling.  If in-person, the student will also learn cell culture techniques and confocal imaging.

Time commitment: Weekly time commitment and length of project are negotiable.  Project can be extended into a summer project or can be just during the term.

Mentoring: The undergraduate student will be directly mentored by a graduate student in the lab with weekly individual meetings and opportunities to interact with other lab members.  There are weekly group meetings that the undergraduate student is encouraged to attend.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position, but we can work together to apply for funding including HCRP and summer programs.

Application information: Email your resume and a one-paragraph description of past experience and interest in this position to Gloria Ha at gloriaha@g.harvard.edu

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in biomedicine, Dr. Zygmanski Lab, BWH

Contact information:

Davide Brivio, Medical Physics Division, Radiation Oncology Department, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 75 Francis St. Boston MA

dbrivio@bwh.harvard.edu

Dr Zygmanski Lab website: http://mesoscopic.bwh.harvard.edu/

 

Project description and duties:

We exploit biophysics, physics, mathematics, and computer engineering to advance the fields of medical imaging and cancer therapy. We are developing

  1. novel sensors employing nano- and micro-structured thin films to monitor  treatment of cancer patients (see for instance these recent publications https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6463/ab83c0; https://doi.org/10.1002/mp.13841)
  2. new   cancer therapy and imaging modalities employing nanoparticles and/or electromagnetic and x-ray radiations to study their interaction with cells (see for instance these recent publications https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6560/aa5bc7; https://doi.org/10.2217/nnm-2017-0344)

We mentored several students under the Harvard PRISE program projects in the past two years. The summer projects were conducted remotely. We will offer the following projects in the future:

  1. Title: Application of low-to-high intensity/frequency electric fields to imaging of tissues and disruption of cancer cells

The project consists in the review of the state-of-the-art imaging and cancer therapy techniques utilizing electric fields fields. There are several potential advantages of electric field based techniques compared to the standard x-ray based techniques: specificity of detection or targeting of cancer cells, possibility of spectral analysis and utilization of resonance effects, low-toxicity due to usage of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation.. Several exciting preliminary investigations are reported in the literature but currently very few are sufficiently mature for clinical utilization. We aim to investigate the state of the art of these novel promising techniques at two scales: macroscopic (tissue) and nanoscopic (cell). The ideal candidate should critically review the literature, with the support of the PI and a post-doc and prepare a report.

  1. Title: Application of electric fields to measurement of radiotherapy dose delivered to the patient.

We are also developing prototype sensor arrays that employ x-ray induced electrical effects for measurement of dose in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy, or image guided interventional radiology procedures. The ideal candidate will show analytical and mathematical skills and be able to perform a computational study. Simulations of physical effects occurring in the experiment via a computational model will be carried in collaboration with the mentors and other students or postdoc.

 

 

 

Skills required: Students with biomedicine, bioengineering, physics or mathematics or computer engineering major are ideal for better understanding of the concepts involved and for performing a computational study.

Learning outcomes:

In project 1. the student will learn the science of electromagnetic interaction with matter applied to specific medical scenarios. The student will learn how to review scientific publications and will acquire scientific communication skills. 

In project 2. the student will learn the basics physics of x-ray radiation interaction with matter for medical and high-energy physics scenarios. The student will learn the basics simulation of experiments using a computational model and how to analyze the results. The student will acquire scientific communication skills.  

Number of hours: The number of hours students are expected to work is negotiable. A minimum of four hours to eight hours per week is required during the academic year and a minimum of 30 hours per week during the summer. However, a flexible schedule is possible.

Mentoring: the student will be mentored by the Harvard Medical Physics Resident Dr Davide Brivio and by the lab Principal Investigator (PI) Dr Piotr Zygmanski (https://mesoscopic.bwh.harvard.edu/). Zoom meetings will be scheduled at the student convenience (weekly or more often when more support is needed). The student can also attend research group zoom meetings. Day to day communication will be via email.

Student stipend: Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Davide Brivio at dbrivio@bwh.harvard.edu or Dr Piotr Zygmanski  pzygmanski@LROC.harvard.edu with a short description of your research interests and of your goals of completing a research experience

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Nahrendorf Lab, MGH

Contact: Matthias Nahrendorf, MNAHRENDORF@MGH.HARVARD.EDU

Professor, Harvard Medical School and Director, Mouse Imaging Program

Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital

Simches Research Building, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114

http://csb.mgh.harvard.edu/investigator/matthias_nahrendorf  

Project description and duties: The Nahrendorf laboratory focuses on the role of immunity in cardiovascular health and disease, specifically in atherosclerosis and heart failure. Of particular interest are the function, supply and production of leukocytes, and the signals that regulate hematopoiesis after injuries such as myocardial infarction or stroke. We described that after MI, the spleen releases a large population of ready-made leukocytes that travel to the ischemic heart (Science 2009, New York Times 2009). We further found that MI, chronic stress and sedentary life style modulate the hematopoietic stem cell niche, activating migration and proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells (Nature 2012, Nature Med 2014, Nature Med 2019). Resident macrophages, on the other hand, do not derive from circulating cells and promote steady state functions such as cardiac conduction (Cell 2017). The laboratory also develops and employs imaging to sample biology non-invasively, using MR, nuclear, optical and microscopic modalities.

We are seeking undergraduate students who are interested in cardio-immunology and electro-immunology and want to participate in exciting experiments in our lab. Specifically, we need help with handling and processing of murine organ samples for flow cytometry and histology, performing ELISAs, protein concentration measurements, PCRs and Image J-based analyses.

Skills required: Pipetting

Learning outcomes: experimental design of mouse experiments, data analysis using ImageJ (myocardial infarct size, histological stainings), lab chart (ECG analyses) and VevoLab (small animal echocardiography), basic understanding of routine laboratory work

Number of hours: negotiable

Mentoring: Jana Grune, PhD, weekly zoom meetings, students ca attend research group zoom meetings

Student stipend: stipends for students are available, but will depend on the work load/hours students are working at the lab.

Application information: Please email us your resume, schedule and hours you want to spend in our lab to MNAHRENDORF@MGH.HARVARD.EDU and JGRUNE@MGH.HARVARD.EDU

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in the Ruvkun lab, MGH

The Rubkan Lab in the Department of Molecular Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital Main Campus is 10 minutes on the Red Line from Harvard Square to Charles Street station (check FAS Science Education Office transportation program for T-passes, contact Dr. Babakhanyan ababakhanyan@fas.harvard.edu)

Contact information: Gary Ruvkun, Department of Molecular Biology, Simches Research Building, 185 Cambridge Street in Boston, just across the street from Beacon Hill. Email:  ruvkun@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu).  Lab website:  www.ruvkun.hms.harvard.edu

Project description and duties:

The Ruvkun Lab is seeking a Harvard undergraduate (or two) to learn cutting-edge molecular genetics with our research group. You will work closely with an experienced postdoc or research associate on C. elegans molecular genetics projects in the fields of small RNAs and viral immunity, and mitochondrial, ribosomal, and proteasomal surveillance. Course work or experience in genetics and molecular biology are helpful. The Ruvkun lab is best known for its work on microRNAs and their role in translational control and on insulin regulation of C. elegans lifespan. But over the past two decades, we have discovered that a variety of ancient cellular pathways are surveilled for disruption, usually by microbial toxins, to trigger immune responses that include production of antiviral siRNAs and antibacterial proteins. The engine of the lab is now full genome sequencing of newly generated mutations in large-scale genetic screening. Because our genetics constantly sends the lab into new fields, diverse fields are explored in the lab. There are currently 8 members of the lab, so it is artisanal science, not big science. The Department of Molecular Biology at Massachusetts General Hospital is a dozen faculty members. The lab has always recruited from diverse training institutions and in this era of racial reconciliation we have redoubled our efforts in this.

Skills required: You will learn molecular biology and genetics.   The more you know, the easier it will be but we figure that you will learn with us.

Learning outcomes: You will become a modern molecular genetics and genomics expert after a couple of years working with us.

Number of hours:  10 hours per week seems about right.  And summers, with a stipend.

Mentoring: With a postdoc or a senior researcher. 

Student stipend: For sure during the summers.   Possibly during the year if the hours are about 10 hours per week.

Application information: Send an email to ruvkun@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu.

 

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in the Henske Lab

PI:           Dr. Elizabeth (Lisa) Henske, MD, Professor of Medicine
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Location: 45 Francis Street, Thorn Building, (Elevator D) Room 826, Boston, MA 02115

Website: https://www.henskelab.org/

          Project Description: The Henske Laboratory is focused on the cell biology and biochemistry of rare genetic diseases, including Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) and lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).  Dr. Henske is a medical oncologist who follows LAM and TSC patients in addition to directing a research laboratory.  Our mission is to translate research discoveries into improved care as quickly as possible, to improve the lives of those affected by these devastating diseases.  TSC is an autosomal dominant syndrome causing seizures, autism, and tumors of the brain, heart, kidney, skin, and lung.  LAM is a destructive, progressive cystic lung disease that affects almost exclusively women and can lead to lung collapse and respiratory failure.  LAM is caused by TSC2 gene mutations in benign tumor cells that metastasize to the lung.   The TSC proteins inhibit the activity of the mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) kinase.

          Some of the research topics covered in the lab:

  • Employing high-throughput screening methodologies to identify novel therapies for TSC and LAM.
  • Developing relevant in vivo models that recapitulate the clinical manifestations of TSC and LAM
  • Understanding how benign-appearing LAM cells metastasize to the lungs
  • Understanding the role of estrogen in the female-predominance of LAM
  • Studying how nutrients, such as lipids, glucose, and amino acids, are utilized by tumor cells that are deficient in the TSC2 protein

 

         Links to published manuscripts and reviews describing our work:

         https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27226234

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27753446

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28498820

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28512249

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25185584

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25780943

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24296756

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21746920

 

Skills required: Prior research experience preferred but not required.

          Learning outcome: students will acquire skills in experimental design, experimental techniques, lab data analysis, presentations, and scientific writing.  If warranted based on their contributions, students will be co-authors on scientific manuscripts. 

          Number of hours: negotiable

          Mentoring: Mentoring will be primarily provided by postdoctoral fellows in the laboratory. The student      will also have regular meetings with Dr. Henske, and attend weekly lab meetings and journal clubs and will have opportunities to present at the lab meetings and journal clubs.

          Funding: The Laboratory does not have funds to pay student stipends, but students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or  register for a research course credit.

To Apply: Please email your resume to Dr. Henske at (ehenske@bwh.harvard.edu) with a cover letter including a brief outline of your interests, goals, and anticipated time availability.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Elisabetta del Re, BIDMC

Contact information: Elisabetta C. del Re, Psychiatry, elisabetta_delre@hms.harvard.edu, Beth Israel, https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Elisabetta-Del-Re

Project description and duties: Neuroimaging and genetics of cortical morphology in Psychotic illnesses

Skills required: No prior experience required; experience with R, python, mathlab, preferred

Learning outcomes: research skills such as processing of neuroimaging scans, anatomy of the brain, psychiatry, principles of genetics, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Hours are negotiable with a minimum of 10 hrs/weekly and attendance to lab meeting

Mentoring: Dr. del Re will mentor daily/weekly; 2 lab meetings/weekly

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position

Application information: Please send CV to Dr. Elisabetta del Re at elisabetta_delre@hms.harvard.edu

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Elisabetta-Del-Re

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Anderson Group - Solar-powered Aircraft - Structural

Contact information: Principal Investigator: Dr. James Anderson, Chemistry and Chemical Biology,  20 Oxford St, website: https://www.arp.harvard.edu/

Primary Contact: Craig Mascarenhas (craigmas@g.harvard.edu)

Project description and duties: The larger context of this project is the research and development of a high-altitude, long-endurance, solar-powered aircraft that will conduct act as a flying climate laboratory. The student will be involved in the research and design of components in the electric propulsion system. For this project, the student will attempt to optimize for weight minimization of the electric propulsion system, by conducting weight optimization studies on the key components.

Skills required: The student have completed basic structural engineering courses and have the ability to conduct structural analysis using Finite Element Analysis. A basic understanding of forces, load transfer, and rotating components is also necessary for the successful completion of this project. This would probably be a junior/senior level project for a mechanical engineering student. Involvement in groups/competitions like Formula SAE, etc. is a big plus.

Learning outcomes: study design, data analysis methods, expertise in FEA, how to present research results, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: negotiable (unless funding through independent source requires minimum hours)

Mentoring: the student will have constant access and a working relationship with Craig Mascarenhas, who will directly oversee this research. The student will also be allowed and encouraged to attend lab meetings (Zoom) and will have meetings with Professor Anderson (PI).

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position. However, the student is encouraged to apply for HCRP and other funding tied to this work - we will support that effort from our end. Previous projects in our group have successfully been funded from similar resources.

Application information: Email your resume to Mr. Craig Mascarenhas (craigmas@g.harvard.edu)

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Anderson Group - Solar-powered Aircraft - Fluid Dynamics

Contact information: Principal Investigator: Dr. James Anderson, Chemistry and Chemical Biology, 20 Oxford St, website: https://www.arp.harvard.edu/

Primary Contact: Craig Mascarenhas (craigmas@g.harvard.edu)

Project description and duties: The larger context of this project is the research and development of a high-altitude, long-endurance, solar-powered aircraft that will conduct act as a flying climate laboratory. The student will be involved in the research and design of the scientific instrument’s flow system that sits inside the fuselage of the aircraft. For this project, the student will attempt to conduct a flow analysis using tools such as CFD, to better understand the internal fluid dynamics of the instrument. Further, research and optimization studies revolving around fluid dynamics will enable the design of key components of the instrument - a flow injector, as well as a re-laminarization adapter module. Depending on the progress and direction of the results from the research, there may or may not be a potential opportunity to validate the results using a wind tunnel through a collaborating partner.

Skills required: The student should have completed basic fluid mechanics courses and have the ability to setup a fluid dynamics simulation using a Computational Fluid Dynamics tool (or be willing to mostly independently learn how to). A basic understanding of fluid flow is necessary for the successful completion of this project. This would probably be a junior/senior level project for a mechanical engineering student. Previous experience in aerodynamics or aerospace is a big plus.

Learning outcomes: study design, data analysis methods, expertise in CFD, how to present research results, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: negotiable (unless funding through independent source requires minimum hours)

Mentoring: the student will have constant access and a working relationship with Craig Mascarenhas, who will directly oversee this research. The student will also be allowed and encouraged to attend lab meetings (Zoom) and will have meetings with Professor Anderson (PI).

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position. However, the student is encouraged to apply for HCRP and other funding tied to this work - we will support that effort from our end. Previous projects in our group have successfully been funded from similar resources.

Application information: Email your resume to Mr. Craig Mascarenhas (craigmas@g.harvard.edu)

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunities in Dr. Norbert Perrimon lab at HMS

Contact information: Norbert Perrimon, Department of Genetics. Harvard Medical School. 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, https://perrimon.med.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: A number of opportunities are available to undergraduates interested in learning Drosophila genetics. Projects involve genome engineering using CRISPR/Cas9, characterization of genes involved in developmental processes, signal transduction and organ communication. Students will be matched with senior postdoctoral fellows depending on their interest. Topics under current study in the lab can be found on the lab website.

Skills required: Previous experience in working in a  lab is preferred nut not required. Students should be interested in biology and genetics.

Learning outcomes: Students will learn how to work with a model organisms and will learn various techniques in genetics and cell biology. They will also learn how to maintain a lab notebook read scientific literature and present scientific talks. It is expected that the students will be co-authors on papers.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project.Negotiable

Mentoring: Students will be matched with talented postdoctoral fellows who will supervise the student. Students will meet with the lab PI regularly to ensure progress. Students will have the option of attending lab meetings in person.

Student stipend: Positions will be for  academic credits.

Application information: Email your resume to Dr. Perrimon at perrimon@genetics.med.harvard.edu

 

 

Aug 12, 2021

Undergraduate Researcher: Epigenetic Mediators of Metabolic Disease, Joslin Diabetes Center

Contact information: Mary Elizabeth Patti MD, Joslin Diabetes Center (Longwood area), mary.elizabeth.patti@joslin.harvard.edu

Project description and duties:   The student would work with a postdoctoral fellow, lab manager, and the principal investigator to investigate mechanisms by which paternal metabolism alters the epigenome of sperm and impacts post-fertilization development and metabolic health of offspring mice.  There are also clinical research components as an option, if this is desired.

Background about project:  The overall goal of research in the Patti Lab at the Joslin Diabetes Center (Longwood area) is to identify the molecular mechanisms mediating type 2 diabetes risk, particularly those arising at the gene-environment interface, which alter epigenetic regulation of gene expression. (Epigenetics refers to mechanisms beyond DNA sequence which can modify the cell’s transcriptional responses.)  We are particularly interested in how early life exposures to suboptimal nutrition or metabolism can “program” increased disease risk in offspring during later life.  Our laboratory utilizes cellular and animal models to study how these early life exposures impact the function of tissues critical for metabolism.

We have recently discovered that nutrition and metabolism in either male or female parents can also influence health of subsequent generations, via epigenetic modifications in germ cells.  Specifically, obesity and diabetes in men can alter epigenetic marks in sperm.  In male mice, this also results in increased metabolic disease in offspring, even when genetics are controlled, when the female mouse is healthy.  Moreover, treatment of male mice to improve their metabolism reverses this process, leading to improved health of offspring.  These exciting data suggest that improving health of parents before conception may be a strategy to reduce obesity and diabetes in their children.

Related clinical/translational studies are focused on understanding how interventions to improve the health of fathers before conception can influence epigenetic marks in sperm, and thus early post-fertilization development and child health.  In related clinical research studies, we investigate mechanisms by which bariatric surgery causes remission of type 2 diabetes, and sometimes even causes hypoglycemia (low blood glucose levels).

Skills required: No prior research skills are needed.

Learning outcomes: study design, data analysis and interpretation, critical review of the scientific literature, how to present data, and scientific writing.

Number of hours:  negotiable, can be part-time during year, summer positions available

Mentoring: The student would be encouraged to attend lab meetings (Zoom) and would have weekly meetings either in person or via Zoom with the PI.

Student stipend: This is primarily a volunteer position.  Full time work (e.g. during summer) could be compensated with stipend.

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Patti at mary.elizabeth.patti@joslin.harvard.edu

 

 

Influence of particulate matter physical properties on air quality and climate, Martin Lab, ESE/EPS

Research in the Martin lab focuses on air pollution and particulate matter and their effects on climate change. Professor Martin led the Green Ocean Amazon Experiment (GoAmazon2014/5) which investigated the effects of human activities on air quality, weather, terrestrial ecosystems, and climate in a tropical, forested context (Martin et al. 2016). Recently, the Martin lab has focused on studying fundamental physical properties of particulate matter that have downstream effects on particulate loadings and the atmospheric processing of pollutants. Questions of interest regarding these physical properties include: For a given particle composition, is the particle a solid, semisolid, or liquid? Does the particle have a uniform, well-mixed composition or has the particle separated into two or more separate phases? How do these properties affect the amount of particulate matter or the impacts of this particulate matter on the climate?

Students will conduct laboratory studies wherein they will generate model aerosol particles in a flow tube or environmental chamber. In addition to analyzing these particles with standard aerosol analytical techniques that characterize the number and size of the particles, the students will determine particle physical properties using a recently developed laser-based instrument called the fluorescence aerosol flow tube (F-AFT). Students will vary the size and chemical composition of the particles and determine the effect that each of these have on the viscosity of the particles and whether the particles phase separate or remain homogenous. The dataset will then be analyzed to determine the implications of these measured relationships on the properties and impacts of ambient particulate matter.

Contact Paul Ohno pohno@fas.harvard.edu

 

 

Jul 21, 2021

Undergraduate Research Position, Orefice Lab, MGH

The Orefice Lab, located at Massachusetts General Hospital, is seeking 2-3 undergraduate research assistants to participate in ongoing projects that aim to understand how somatosensory and viscerosensory circuits may be disrupted in models of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Competitive hourly rates for work compensation will be provided. Students from underrepresented groups are especially encouraged to apply to this position.

Each student would work with a graduate student or postdoc in the lab. One project investigates how early somatosensory experiences shape the development of the touch circuitry and behaviors in mice.

A second project aims to understand how gastrointestinal functions are altered in animal models of ASD. Undergraduate students working on these projects would have the opportunity to perform mouse behavior, mouse husbandry, tissue processing, histology, imaging and electrophysiology techniques, as well as various data analysis methods. Prior experience with rodent models is a plus, but is not required.

The positions could begin as soon as possible, but start dates are flexible. Interested students should be willing to commute to MGH and to commit to a minimum of 10 hours a week in the lab during the school year. The position is paid hourly. Ideal applicants will be willing to make a long-term commitment to this project (a year or more), provided that the lab is a good fit for the student.

If interested, please send your CV to ydai@g.harvard.edu, yuchenhsieh@g.harvard.edu, and hlwoodworth@partners.org

In your email please specify:

1) your research interests and why you are interested in joining our laboratory

2) your previous research laboratory experience, if any

3) current year, major, and courses you may be taking

4) the approximate days and times you may be able to work in the lab (e.g. Monday mornings from 8-12pm, Friday afternoons from 12-5pm)

5) career or post-graduate plans (if known)

Student training will be tailored to the applicant’s skill set and interests, with the aim of nurturing independence and scientific proficiency. In addition to developing technical lab skills, the student will have the opportunity to enhance their scientific knowledge by participating in lab meetings, journal clubs, and seminars as schedules allow. We are committed to providing a mentorship-focused research environment that will help prepare students for future careers in biomedical research. Students showing strong dedication may have the opportunity to perform an independent research project. Students who contribute significantly to a research project would be included as co-authors on publications resulting from the project.

For further questions, please contact ydai@g.harvard.edu, yuchenhsieh@g.harvard.edu, and hlwoodworth@partners.org.  For more information on the lab, visit https://www.oreficelab.org/.

 

Remote or in person neuroscience/mental health/psychosis and genetics research

Contact information: Dr. Elisabetta del Re, Psychiatry, elisabetta_delre@hms.harvard.edu; Beth Israel 

Project description and duties: There are several projects: Trauma effects on brain morphometry; Genetics of brain morphometry; Duration of psychosis effects on brain morphology

Skills required: Some experience with R, python, mathlab are welcome

Learning outcomes: Study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours students are expected to work are flexible

Mentoring: Dr. del Re will directly mentor students; we have lab meeting for our research group and take part of larger lab meetings under the umbrella of psychosis reseach

Student stipend: This is a voluntary position

Application information: If interested, send your CV and introductory email to Dr. del Re at elisabetta_delre@hms.harvard.edu

 

Jul 1, 2021

Aging and epigenetics undergraduate research opportunity, HMS

PI: Dr. David Sinclair, HMS (Genetics)

Lab Website and Publications: https://sinclair.hms.harvard.edu/

Project and Duties: Research projects in the Sinclair lab focus broadly on understanding aging and ameliorating age-related disease. For this opportunity, work would focus on using biomolecules to predict age, mortality, and disease risk from biological samples, which can be used to rapidly assess longevity interventions. Duties would include extracting and quantifying DNA, organizing biological samples, and assisting with molecular / cellular biology relevant to the project.

Skills required: Early undergraduate students are not expected to have prior laboratory experience. Later (Juniors) should have some laboratory experience in molecular biology in addition to advanced coursework in these areas. All interested candidates should be curious and expect a steep learning curve.

Learning outcome: Students will gain exposure to a variety of molecular / cellular biology techniques and can learn bioinformatic analysis as well. More importantly, students will better understand the conduct of research and learn to apply problem solving to the scientific method.

Time Commitment: Students are encouraged to pursue their thesis research in the Sinclair Lab. Ideally, candidates will stay 1 or more summers (full time) and work part time (~10 hours/week) throughout the academic year.

Mentoring: Postdocs and graduate students with experience mentoring students will directly advise undergraduate mentees. Students are encouraged to attend lab meetings and journal club if time permits. Students will be encouraged to apply for nationally competitive scholarships such as the Goldwater/NSF and will receive guidance in science careers and technical writing.

Funds Available: Students can be payed or earn credit and are encouraged to apply for fellowships for experience in science writing.

Application: Please email a CV or resume and short (<300 words) description of previous experience, research motivation, and intended career path to Patrick Griffin (ptgriffin@g.harvard.edu) with the subject line “Undergraduate Research Application”. Interested candidates are welcome to meet with members of the lab or discuss their interests before committing to a formal position.

 

 

June 28, 2021

Student Research Intern - Shrestha Auditory Research, MEEI

A summer intern position is available starting July 2021 in the laboratory of Dr. Brikha Shrestha at Mass Eye & Ear / Harvard Medical School, which studies the molecular genetic regulation of neuronal identities in the mouse auditory system using single-cell genomics. This position entails performing bioinformatic analysis of single-cell RNA-sequencing data using R.

Apply online https://partners.taleo.net/careersection/mee/jobdetail.ftl?job=3159259&tz=GMT-04%3A00&tzname=America%2FNew_York

 

 

June 14, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunities at Zomorrodi Lab, MGH/HMS

 

Contact information:

Ali R. Zomorrodi 

Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center

Massachusetts General Hospital for Children

44 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114

E-mail: azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu

Zomorrodi lab website

 

Project description and duties: 

Zomorrodi lab integrates biological networks, mathematical/statistical/physical models and engineering tools complemented with tractable experiential systems to develop computational mechanistic models of the microbiome and the host. These models are used to advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and to streamline the design of personalized treatments.

 

The following computational and experimental projects are available: 

  1. Using short-read long-read sequencing technologies for human microbiome profiling. This project has an experimental (wet-lab) component, which should be done in person and a computational component that can be performed remotely. 
  2. Using machine learning approaches to analyze microbiome data. This project can be performed entirely remotely.

 

Skills required:

Project 1: Experience and familiarity with basic and molecular biology lab techniques beyond virtual lab courses (pipetting, PCR, gel electrophoresis, etc) are needed for the experimental component of this project.. Familiarity with DNA isolation, genomic, 16S or RNA sequencing is a plus but not a requirement. No mathematical or computer programming skills are needed for the computational component. 

Project 2: Having a keen interest in computational research is the only requirement and no mathematical or computer programming skills are needed. Familiarity with a programming language and/or with machine learning is a plus not a requirement. 

 

Learning outcomes

Students will learn how computational simulations, biological network models and machine learning or state-of-the-art experimental techniques for human microbiome analysis can be used to address biomedical and translational problems. More broadly, students gain experience in essential research skills including data collection and analysis, interpretation of results, presentations, and scientific writing.

 

Time commitment:

A minimum of six months or longer commitment is required. The PI is, however, flexible to accommodate students’ schedules or other time demands. 

 

Mentoring: 

Students will be directly mentored by Dr. Zomorrodi and have the opportunity to remotely interact with other lab members and attend group meetings. Mentorship zoom meetings are held once a week on a regular basis.  

 

Student stipend: 

This is a volunteer research position. Students are encouraged to apply for undergraduate research fellowships such as HCRP or to register for a research course credit. 

 

Application information

Interested candidates should email a CV to Dr. Zomorrodi at azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu and briefly explain what their interests are. Please use “2021 Undergraduate Research Opportunities” as the subject of your email.

 

 

June 4, 2021

Undergraduate Research Internship, Nucera Group, BIDMC

Human Thyroid Cancers Preclinical and Translational Research Laboratory
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Harvard Medical School 
Boston, MA

Carmelo Nucera, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School
Principal Investigator Human Thyroid Cancers Preclinical and Translational Research Program
Specialist in Endocrine Diseases and Metabolism
Division of Experimental Pathology

Department of Pathology
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Simon C. Fireman Research Center
Harvard Medical School
99 Brookline Avenue
Office Room: RN-0270K
Email 1: cnucera@bidmc.harvard.edu
Office-Phone: 617-667-5964
Lab-Phone: 617-667-1696
Fax: 617-667-3591
Boston (MA) 02215, USA

Associate Member at the BROAD Institute of Harvard and MIT

My laboratory is open to accept ungraduate students. I'm genuinely dedicated to mentor undergraduate students and advancing translational Thyroid Cancer Research and non-coding RNA discoveries.

I'm actively committed to mentor and apply my research to patient care, to facilitate innovation for healthcare, solve unmet clinical needs, and ultimately improve public health.

I am an MD/PhD with specialty in endocrine cancers and I’m developing as Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School a multidisciplinary research program in the Division of Experimental Pathology at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School, focused on preclinical and translational models of human thyroid cancer with an emphasis on mechanisms of metastatic networks, new models of tumor microenvironment, and metabolic regulations, using novel targeted therapies anti-BRAFV600E and anti-tumor microenvironment. I am primarily engaged in basic and translational thyroid cancer research, but also actively participate in tutoring and teaching activities to basic science students and medical students. I have more than 15-years of biomedical research experience.

In particular, my research interests are in elucidating mechanisms by which the oncogene BRAFV600E leads to the invasive and metastatic phenotype in aggressive and iodine-refractory thyroid cancers.

I'm highly committed and motivated to applying my research and effort to patient care, to facilitate innovation, to solve unmet clinical needs, and improve public health.

I have been awarded from the American Thyroid Association, ITOG and the NIH/NCI for Thyroid Cancer Research, Tumor Microenvironment, and BRAFV600E pathways.

My translational research and mentoring program is aimed:

  1. To determine the prognostic role of Long intergenic non-coding RNA (LincRNA) in thyroid cancer.
  2. To identify new prognostic biomarkers and validate therapeutics for treating metastatic/refractory thyroid cancers.
  3. To identify pro-metastatic/-angiogenic and metabolic pathways in the microenvironment of thyroid cancer.
  4. To determine the function of blood vessels in thyroid cancer and identify driver clones in the angiogenic microenvironment of thyroid tumors (tumor heterogeneity).
  5. To investigate pathogenesis and molecular basis of “orphan and rare’ endocrine diseases.

The hours of intershnisp per week are variable and can be discussed and set along with the student.

If you are interested in applying to this Program please submit your Curriculum Vitae and email address of 2 references (i.e. Faculty) to:

Carmelo Nucera cnucera@bidmc.harvard.edu

 

 

 

June 2, 2021

Undergraduate research opportunity, Viswanathan Lab, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/HMS

PI: Srinivas Viswanathan, MD, PhD, Department: Medical Oncology, DFCIs
Contact Information: Srinivas.viswanathan@dfci.harvard.edu
Location: Dana Building 15th Floor, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Lab Website: viswanathanlab.dana-farber.org

Description of the project and duties (link to published manuscripts describing the work):

The Viswanathan lab uses cutting-edge genomic and genome-scale functional genetic technologies to dissect the molecular underpinnings and vulnerabilities of cancer, with a focus on genitourinary cancers (particularly cancers of the prostate and kidney). A range of exciting undergraduate research opportunities are available in either a wet-lab or dry-lab setting. Potential areas of research include the following:

  1. Use of genome-scale functional genetic (CRISPR) screening, biochemistry, and proteomics to discover new therapeutic targets in castration-resistant prostate cancer.
  2. Genetic and drug-screening of kidney cancer models in order to identify new therapies for rare and aggressive subtypes of kidney cancer.
  3. Molecular biology and biochemistry studies to understand the basic mechanisms of tumorigenesis in genitourinary cancers.
  4. Analysis of whole genome and transcriptome sequencing data from patients with prostate and kidney cancers, including the analysis of single-cell RNA sequencing data.

A list of published manuscripts on related work can be found at the following link: https://viswanathanlab.dana-farber.org/publications.html 

Skills required:

  • For those interested in wet lab projects, prior experience or exposure to a laboratory environment is preferred.
  • For those interested in dry lab projects, facility or working familiarity with R, python, and Unix is preferred.

Learning outcome: The student will develop a broad array of research skills. Over time, the student will develop graded technical and conceptual independence related to the project, with the ability to contribute to study design, data acquisition, and data analysis. The student will have opportunities to present data in both individual meetings and group settings.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: Negotiable

Mentoring: The student will receive mentorship from postdoctoral fellows in the laboratory as well as through regular meetings with the PI.

Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and/or register for research course credit.

Please submit a brief statement of interest and your CV to Dr. Viswanathan at Srinivas.viswanathan@dfci.harvard.edu

 

 

May 25, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Rashidian, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/HMS

Contact information: Mohammad Rashidian, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Assistant Professor of Radiology, Harvard Medical School

Project description and duties: Development of a scaffold for multiplex imaging of immune responses

Immunotherapy has revolutionized cancer treatment, however, a significant fraction of patients fail to respond to therapy and may suffer serious side effects. Our lab studies cancer immunology using expertise in chemical biology, molecular biology, and immunology. We are focused on understanding the underlying mechanisms of how the tumor microenvironment is shaped and continuously changed in response to cancer immunotherapies. We aim to develop new and improved diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic tools to detect, diagnose, characterize, treat, and prevent cancer.

Our research aims are fivefold: (1) to develop methods for non-invasive monitoring of immune responses; (2) to investigate changes in the tumor microenvironment (TME) in response to treatment; (3) to explore how to reshape the TME to a more pronounced anti-tumor status and develop tools to realize this possibility; and (4) to develop precision therapeutics for cancer. In the long term, our goals are to help better understand the dynamics of immune responses, and to investigate what is behind the heterogeneous response to cancer immunotherapy. These are essential for developing more effective therapies, more effective methods for early detection of cancer, and new prognostic modalities.

Skills required: students with basic biology lab skillsets are encouraged to apply, however, no prior research experience is required. Students will have the opportunity to work with senior scientists in the lab to be trained for lab techniques.

Learning outcomes: research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing, as well as lab skillsets such as cell culture, protein engineering, protein expression and purification, ELISA analysis, running SDS-PAGE, mass-spec, and western blot analyses, protein labeling, and working with instruments such as FPLC, LC-MS, microscopy and flow cytometry.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: at least 30 h per week for the summer.

Mentoring: senior graduate students and postdocs in the lab will be mentoring students. The PI will have regular weekly meetings with students as well.

Student stipend: positions are volunteer positions, however the PI will work with students to apply for available fellowship programs (HCRP, PRISE, etc.).

Application information: motivated students should contact Dr. Rashidian at mohammad_rashidian@dfci.harvard.edu

 

 

May 10, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Computational and Systems Biology at Zomorrodi Lab, MGH/HMS

 

Contact information:

Ali R. Zomorrodi 

Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center

Massachusetts General Hospital for Children

44 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114

E-mail: azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu

Zomorrodi lab website

 

Project description and duties: 

Zomorrodi lab integrates biological networks, mathematical/statistical/physical models and engineering tools to develop computational mechanistic models of the microbiome and the host. These models are used to advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and to streamline the design of personalized treatments.

 

The following projects (that can be entirely performed remotely) are available: 

  1. Construct the next generation of biological network models for innate immune cells (macrophages) through integrating models of metabolism and gene expression.
  2. Using machine learning approaches to analyze microbiome data

 

Skills required:

Having a keen interest in computational research is the only requirement and 

no mathematical or programming skills are needed. For students who are particularly interested in computational modeling or computer programming there are ample opportunities to tailor the project toward their interests. 

 

Learning outcomes

Students will learn how computational simulations and biological network models can be used to address translational problems. More broadly, students gain experience in essential research skills including data analysis, interpretation of results, presentations, and scientific writing.

 

Time commitment:

Negotiable. The PI is flexible to accommodate students’ schedules or other time demands although students who plan to stay in the lab for longer time periods (six months or so) are preferred. 

 

Mentoring: 

Students will be directly mentored by Dr. Zomorrodi and have the opportunity to remotely interact with other lab members and attend group meetings. Mentorship zoom meetings are held once a week on a regular basis.  

 

Student stipend: 

This is a volunteer research position. Students are encouraged to apply for undergraduate research fellowships such as HCRP or to register for a research course credit. 

 

Application information

Interested candidates should email a CV to Dr. Zomorrodi at azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu and briefly explain what their interests are. Please use “2021 Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunities” as the subject of your email.

 

 

 

April 21, 2021

In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Sun’s lab, Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary

Contact information:  Assist. Prof. Daniel Sun  daniel_sun@meei.harvard.edu

Dept. of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School  MEEI/SERI  20 Staniford Str, Boston, 02144

Project description and duties:

Dr. Sun’s focus is on glial cells, in particular astrocytes, and their role in the eye disease glaucoma.  He is interested in studying the “reactive” changes they undergo in disease and whether these changes are supportive or detrimental to the neurons they surround.  This is important because astrocytes have, for a long time, been considered unsupportive in disease, but recent studies in other parts of the CNS show that this may not be the case.  What happens in diseases of the eye?  The lab applies genetic tools in in-vivo mouse models and general cell biological techniques.

Skills required:

In-person: Ideally, mice lineage genotyping/PCR, qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, fixed tissue sectioning, western blots, confocal imaging, ocular tissue dissections.  Previous wet lab experience is a plus, but not completely necessary.

Remotely: Animal database maintenance, image analysis.

Learning outcomes:

The student will receive training for the tasks he/she is involved in (e.g., if they do not have some of the skills required).  Additional to the techniques in Skills Required, the student will also gain experience in measuring visual function in live mice using the electroretinogram (ERG), and optomotor response (OMR).

During the apprenticeship the student will learn how to work an experimental protocol, how to analyze the data, how to present and critically discuss the results, attend journal clubs, and how to collaborate in a scientific environment.

Number of hours:

It would be ideal for the student to be in the lab daily, however, flexibility is considered and can be discussed.  Negotiable.  Ideally, we would like to establish a long-term relationship with the student for 1-2 years that results in solid work on a project and inclusion in publications.

Mentoring:

The student will be mentored by Dr. Sun, who will check weekly on the student’s progress.  Additionally, Dr. Mazumder will also be in the lab and provide daily mentorship.  The student is expected to attend lab Zoom meetings, journal clubs, and discuss his/her results and present data.

Student stipend:

This is an unpaid, volunteer position.

Application information:

If interested, please direct your email with your CV/resume to:

Dr. Daniel Sun (daniel_sun@meei.harvard.edu)

 

 

April 12, 2021

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunities in photoimmunotherapy, MGH for summer 2021

Contact Information: Tayyaba Hasan, PhD   Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School
Faculty/PI email:  thasan@mgh.harvard.edu
Mentor name:  Pushpamali De Silva, PhD
Mentor primary email:  JLDESILVA@mgh.harvard.edu
Lab location:  Thier 201D

Website: https://hasanlab.mgh.harvard.edu

What we do: PDT is a photochemistry-based approach that is increasingly used to treat a wide number of diseases and requires: (i) light of appropriate wavelength, (ii) a light activatable chemical compound (photosensitizer or PS), and (iii) molecular oxygen.  PDT achieves its cytotoxic effect by producing active molecular species including oxygen radicals and singlet oxygen. The major aspects of PDT that are currently studied in our laboratory are targeted PDT of tumors, site-directed PDT of Microorganisms, mechanism-based PDT combination therapies, Image-guided therapeutics, and model Development.

Project 1 (remote): Biological consequences of photodynamic priming in the pancreatic tumor microenvironment

We are interested in the biological consequences of PDT at both the cellular and molecular level in combination with more traditional therapies such as chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. For that we have conducted in vivo combination treatments with PDT-chemotherapy combination and set up a RNAseq data set that we expect to analyze further to derive combination therapy responses.

Skills required: A basic understanding of tumor biology, some prior knowledge on RNAseq data analysis skills with python or R, and biostatistics preferred.

Learning Outcomes: The selected candidate will undergo training in immunocytology, gene expression analysis, data analysis methodology and data presentation.

Number of Hours: The candidate will be expected to work ~4-5 hours/week though flexibility is considered based on the candidate’s course load.

Mentoring: Dr De Silva will be the primary mentor and will meet with the student no less than twice a week. The student will be able to attend group zoom meetings where applicable. Mentoring will also involve walking through details of lab procedures and monitoring these are performed in accordance with best practices.

Student Stipend: This is a volunteer position. We have no funding available for this position but would be willing to help selected students identify funding mechanisms.

Application Information: Please email your resume to Laura Maddox for the Hasan Labs at Lbmaddox@mgh.harvard.edu and copy JLDESILVA@mgh.harvard.edu

Project 2 (onsite): “Photodynamic-priming of pancreatic tumors for conquering inherent resistant barriers to immunotherapy

There is an unmet need for innovative research findings that would increase the 5-year survival rate in patients with pancreatic cancer, which in fact has seen only small increments over the past two decades. Our ongoing work investigates a possibility to enhance anti-tumor immune response against pancreatic cancer with PDT-immunotherapy combination treatment. We are incorporating in vitro models for the therapeutic modeling and will be utilizing different immune and molecular assays for this work.

Skills required: A basic understanding of tumor biology and basic skills in cell culture preferred.

Learning Outcomes: The selected candidate will undergo training in cell culture, flow cytometry, immunocytology, gene expression analysis and data analysis.

Location: The project requires considerable bench work and the candidate is expected to work on-site in the Hasan lab at Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital. This will require an exception form to be filed for onsite work at MGH and the student is expected to adhere to all COVID safety rules.

Number of Hours: The candidate will be expected to work a minimum of 20 hours/week through the summer although there is flexibility in hours depending on the candidate’s course load.

Mentoring: Dr De Silva will be the primary mentor and will meet with the student no less than twice a week. The student will be able to attend group zoom meetings where applicable. Mentoring will also involve walking through details of lab procedures and monitoring these are performed in accordance with best practices.

Student Stipend: This is a volunteer position.  We have no funding available for this position but would be willing to help selected students identify funding mechanisms.

Application Information: Please email your resume to Laura Maddox for the Hasan Labs at Lbmaddox@mgh.harvard.edu and copy JLDESILVA@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

 

Dual function antibody conjugates for oral cancer management, MGH (onsite)

Contact Information: Tayyaba Hasan, PhD   Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School

Faculty/PI email:  thasan@mgh.harvard.edu
Mentor name:  Mohammad Ahsan Saad, PhD
Mentor primary email:  MSAAD1@mgh.harvard.edu
Lab location:  Thier 201D
Website: https://hasanlab.mgh.harvard.edu

Project description and duties:

Precision imaging is an important tool for diagnosing and guiding tumor therapies. In context of oral cancers, precision imaging can be used for guiding tumor resection surgeries, the primary method of oral cancer management in USA. To assist in image-guidance during oral cancer surgeries and address concerns regarding residual microscopic disease, post-surgery, this project deals with the development of molecular-targeted probes for real-time multimodal imaging of oral cancer tissues and photodynamic therapy of residual microscopic disease. The candidate will be expected to perform culturing of cancer cells, synthesize conjugates with imaging and therapeutic properties and perform a significant amount of cell microscopy.

Skills required: Candidates with strong interests in chemical synthesis, development of in vitro tumor models and bio-medical imaging are encouraged to apply.

Location: The project requires considerable bench work and the candidate is expected to work on-site in the Hasan lab at Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital. This will require an exception form to be filed for onsite work at MGH and the student is expected to adhere to all COVID safety rules.

Learning Outcomes: The selected candidate will be involved and trained in the synthesis and characterization of molecular targeted imaging probes, fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging (acquisition and analysis) of in vitro tumor tissue phantoms, photodynamic therapy of in vitro oral cancer models and tumor cell viability assessments.

Number of Hours: The candidate will be expected to work a minimum of 20 hours/week through the summer although there is flexibility in hours depending on the candidate’s course load.

Mentoring: Dr Saad will be the primary mentor and will meet with the student no less than twice a week. The student will be able to attend group zoom meetings where applicable. Mentoring will also involve walking through details of lab procedures and monitoring these are performed in accordance with best practices. 

Student Stipend: This is a volunteer position. We have no funding available for this position but would be willing to help selected students identify funding mechanisms.

Application Information: Please email your resume to Laura Maddox for the Hasan Labs at Lbmaddox@mgh.harvard.edu and copy MSAAD1@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance, MGH (Remote/Onsite Mix)


Contact Information: Tayyaba Hasan, PhD   Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School
Faculty/PI email:  thasan@mgh.harvard.edu
Mentor name:  Yanfang Feng, PhD
Mentor primary email:  yfeng0@mgh.harvard.edu
Lab location:  Thier 201D (but partially remote position)
Website: https://hasanlab.mgh.harvard.edu

Project information:

Critically high levels of antibiotic resistance have been found all over the world. However, effective treatment strategies against bacterial pathogens with antibiotic resistance are still lacking. One key research topic of our group is bacterial antibiotic resistance led by β-lactamases, one type of enzymes bacteria could use to degrade and thus fail the prescribed antibiotic. Fortunately, drugs that could inhibit these enzymes, namely, β-lactamase inhibitors, have been developed and entering the market now. By coupling fluorescence identification of β-lactamase activity with antibiotic susceptibility testing, we are aiming to disclose the quantitative relationship between β-lactamase inhibition and bacterial drug susceptibility restoration during β-lactamase inhibitor treatment. If successful, this work will provide the infectious disease society practical scientific grounds for regulating the use of β-lactamase inhibitors in order to achieve the best clinical outcome.

Skills required: A basic understanding of bacteriology, enzyme kinetics and biostatistics. Prior knowledge on genetic sequencing technology and the related data analysis is a plus.

Learning Outcomes: The selected candidate will undergo training in bacteriology, study design, data analysis,  and data presentation.

Number of Hours: The candidate will be expected to work a minimum of 20 hours/week through the summer although there is flexibility in hours depending on the candidate’s course load. This position is entirely remote/not onsite due to COVID restrictions.

Mentoring: Dr Feng will be the primary mentor and will meet with the student no less than twice a week. The student will be able to attend group zoom meetings where applicable. Mentoring will also involve walking through details of lab procedures and monitoring these are performed in accordance with best practices.

Student Stipend: This is a volunteer position. We have no funding available for this position but would be willing to help selected students identify funding mechanisms.

Application Information: Please email your resume to Laura Maddox for the Hasan Labs at Lbmaddox@mgh.harvard.edu and copy yfeng0@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

April 5, 2021

 

Study of gender, racial disparity, wellness in academic disciplines, with Dr. Fiona Fennessy, BWH

Contact information: Fiona Fennessy, MD PhD, Wellness Officer, Dept of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, ffennessy@bwh.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: Performing gender, racial disparity and wellness searches in academic disciplines and professional societies

Skills required: Statistical and social media skills

Learning outcomes: research skills such as metanalysis, bibliometrics, systematic reviews and scientific writing

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project; negotiable

Mentoring: All mentoring and meetings will be through ZOOM meetings. Students will work with a team of MDs- medical student, fellows and attendings who are currently working on projects. Meetings can be once-twice/week, once the research plan is clear to the student.

Student stipend: Volunteer position.

Application information: Email your resume to Dr. Fiona Fennessy at ffennessy@bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

April 1, 2021

Undergraduate research opportunity, Thoracic Surgery Research Labs, MGH

Uma Sachdeva, MD, PhD and Yolonda Colson, MD, PhD

Division of Thoracic Surgery

Massachusetts General Hospital

Simches Research Center

185 Cambridge St.

Boston, MA 02114

Description of the project and duties:

Our lab seeks to identify molecular pathways underlying the development and progression of esophageal cancer. Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer and sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Projects investigate the contribution of stress response pathways to the development of esophageal cancer. Common molecular and cell biology techniques will be utilized, including PCR, quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, Western blotting, cell culture and transfection, and 3D organoid culture. PI is committed to training and mentoring student towards honors thesis and involvement in manuscript preparation and publication with co-authorship.

Skills required. (Are students expected to have any laboratory skills, if so what are they?) If no prior research experience is required, state so and it will encourage students to apply since most do not have prior research experience.

No prior laboratory research experience is required, but students must have a strong interest and commitment to learning and to the scientific discovery process. Meticulous record keeping, strong communication skills, and strong writing skills are preferred.

Learning outcome: laboratory skills, research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentations, scientific writing, etc.

Students will learn cell and molecular biology techniques, study design, data analysis, and scientific writing. Participation in lab meetings will teach scientific presentation skills. PI is an alumna of Harvard College with a strong commitment to scientific mentoring.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if it is negotiable, state so)

Students should plan to work a minimum of 10 hours per week.

Mentoring: who will be mentoring student, how often are mentorship meetings, etc.

Primary mentoring will be by PI Uma Sachdeva, a thoracic surgeon at MGH and alumna of Harvard College (Kirkland House). Dr Sachdeva is starting a new laboratory effort in esophageal cancer at MGH, under the strong mentorship of Dr Yolonda Colson, Chief of the Division of Thoracic Surgery at MGH. Students will work with Dr Sachdeva daily, and will participate in joint lab meetings weekly. Mentorship towards graduate or professional schools will be provided by Drs. Sachdeva and Colson, who are both committed to mentor the next generation of translational scientists.

Does laboratory provide any funds to pay student’s stipend? If not state that students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

Students are encouraged to apply for course credit, including towards an honors thesis in an area of biomedical sciences, with strong mentorship provided towards this end. Students are also encouraged to apply for funding through the HCRP, with PI mentorship commitment towards this goal.

What information students need to submit and contact information for submitting this information: (ex. Email your resume to Dr. Smith at ….)

Email your resume with a cover letter to Dr Sachdeva at uma.sachdeva@mgh.harvard.edu

 

March 18, 2021

Remote undergraduate research opportunity at Surgical Planning Lab, BWH/HMS 

Contact information: Nazim Haouchine and Sarah Frisken, Harvard Medical School. Radiology Department. Email: nhaouchine@bwh.harvard.edu, sfrisken@bwh.harvard.edu, 75 Francis Street, Boston MA 02115

Project description and duties:

The Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) is a computer science oriented laboratory in the Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School. The SPL is looking for a motivated student to develop an automated 3D-3D registration system between preoperative and  intraoperative 3D models of patients’ heads. The candidate will first test existing techniques for 3D face reconstruction (open source code is available), then a registration algorithm using facial landmarks (eyes, nose ...) extracted from both 3D models. The student can leverage deep learning methods to automatically extract facial landmarks. The candidate will be working with computer scientists and surgeons from the department of Radiology and Neurosorgy.

Skills required: Experience in programming in Python and ability to quickly prototype algorithms but it’s not necessary. Understanding of image processing and 3D geometry modeling. Basic knowledge in Machine learning is a plus. Motivation !

Learning outcomes:

This position provides an excellent opportunity to be involved in cutting-edge research in surgical navigation, and offers a stimulating environment to work closely with engineers, computer scientists, radiologists and surgeons. The position also offers the opportunity of observing surgical procedures in our state-of-the-art operating room using intraoperative imaging. The candidate will also gain valuable written and oral communication skills, and the possibility for co-authorship on publications.

Number of hours: Minimal commitment of 30 hours per week. 12 to 16 weeks. Flexible.

Mentoring:

Students will be mentored by a senior Post-doctoral Researcher in the group and meet with the mentor 1-2 times per week via zoom. Students can also attend weekly group meetings / talks and can connect with other members of the group. Students will also get regular feedback from neurosurgeons.

Student stipend: The position is a volunteer position. However, a stipend could be offered.

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Nazim Haouchine at nhaouchine@bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote undergraduate research opportunity at Surgical Planning Lab, BWH/HMS

Contact information: Nazim Haouchine and Sarah Frisken, Harvard Medical School. Radiology Department. Email: nhaouchine@bwh.harvard.edu, sfrisken@bwh.harvard.edu, 75 Francis Street, Boston MA 02115

Project description and duties:

The Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) is a computer science oriented laboratory in the Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School. The SPL is looking for a motivated student to develop a tool to synthesize 2D XRay images. The idea is to be able to create a large dataset of XRay images to be used later with a deep learning model. Open source is already available. The student will have to test and try the existing techniques (GAN, Image Analogy). The candidate will be working with computer scientists and surgeons from the department of Radiology and Neurosorgy.

Skills required: Experience in programming in Python and ability to quickly prototype algorithms but it’s not necessary. Understanding of image processing and 3D geometry modeling. Basic knowledge in Machine learning is a plus. Motivation !

Learning outcomes:

This position provides an excellent opportunity to be involved in cutting-edge research in surgical navigation, and offers a stimulating environment to work closely with engineers, computer scientists, radiologists and surgeons. The position also offers the opportunity of observing surgical procedures in our state-of-the-art operating room using intraoperative imaging. The candidate will also gain valuable written and oral communication skills, and the possibility for co-authorship on publications.

Number of hours: Minimal commitment of 30 hours per week. 12 to 16 weeks. Flexible.

Mentoring:  Students will be mentored by a senior Post-doctoral Researcher in the group and meet with the mentor 1-2 times per week via zoom. Students can also attend weekly group meetings / talks and can connect with other members of the group. Students will also get regular feedback from neurosurgeons.

Student stipend: The position is a volunteer position. However, a stipend could be offered.

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Nazim Haouchine at nhaouchine@bwh.harvard.edu

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, MJ Lab, Harvard Medical School/MGH

Contact information: Dr. Jalali, MGH Institute for Technology Assessment, https://scholar.harvard.edu/jalali

Project description and duties: MJ Lab develops and uses simulation models and data science methods to understand complex public health issues and inform decision and policy making. The lab invites undergraduate students for research opportunities all year round—underrepresented minorities are especially encouraged to apply. The candidates are expected to assist the research team with literature search, data analysis, and writing the results. There are several ongoing analytical and modeling projects at the lab; one of the major areas of research is the development of a national, population-level simulation model to inform opioid policies and conduct economic evaluations. The lab has also been analyzing the impacts of COVID-19 on opioid overdose deaths and opioid use disorder treatment. A new area of research includes the analysis of polysubstance and illicit stimulant use, use disorder, and overdose.

Skills required: Excellent writing and communication skills are required. Priority goes to motivated and organized individuals, committed to doing impactful population health research, with great attention to detail. Experience in data analysis, programming, mathematical modeling, machine learning, or text mining is not required but preferred.

Learning outcomes: Students will gain experience in review and assimilation of literature, data analysis and visualization, and composition of presentations and presentation of the results. Students are often involved in more than one project to provide them with the opportunity to explore different areas of research.

Number of hours: Flexible. Students work from 6 to 15 hours per week depending on their availability. More hours are expected during the summer.

Mentoring: Students will work in a collaborative, productive, and friendly research team, working closely with research associates and postdoc researchers. All project teams meet regularly with the PI and discuss the research. The PI is passionate about meeting with students to advise about the preparation of graduate school applications and career development.

Student stipend: One paid and three unpaid positions are available. Students are welcome to take credits for research at their programs. The PI will support students to apply for undergraduate research fellowships such as HCRP.

Application information: Candidates should send their CV to Dr. Jalali (msjalali@mgh.harvard.edu). Please put “Undergraduate Research Opportunity” in the subject, provide your availability over the spring and summer semesters, and feel free to ask any questions.

 

 

March 10, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational Biology and Network Medicine, BWH

Contact information: Dr. Kimberly Glass, Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, email: kimberly.glass@channing.harvard.edu; website: sites.google.com/a/channing.harvard.edu/kimberlyglass

Project description and duties: This project will involve downloading and analyzing publicly available chromatin structure (HiC) data. This will include cleaning, processing, and characterizing the data. The primary objective of the project will be to create a map linking distal DNA regions to promoter regions of genes based on the data. A secondary objective of the project will be to add other genomic information, such as the location of transcription factor binding sites, to this map.

Skills required: Necessary skills include (1) basic programming experience in languages such as python, R, or MATLAB, (2) good writing and communication skills, including familiarity with Microsoft Office products, (3) ability to respond to feedback and work well with a diverse team, (4) basic familiarity with molecular biology (eg what is DNA, RNA, gene, protein). No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcomes: Over the course of the project, the student will obtain basic skills for computational biology research, including learning how to find and read relevant scientific papers, learning how to obtain and perform basic processing of large Omics data, and learning many concepts important for multi-Omic data integration, gene regulation, and network modeling. In addition, the supportive research environment our group fosters will provide the student with insights into what it is like to do computational research in an academic setting.

Number of hours: Number of hours and project duration is flexible.

Mentoring: The student will have dedicated 30 min meetings with Dr. Glass every other week as well as weekly meetings with a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Glass’ group. Attendance at Dr. Glass’ biweekly (two times a week) lab group meeting will also be strongly encouraged, but not required.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position.

Application information: Interested applicants should send an email explaining their interest in the project together with a recent resume to kimberly.glass@channing.harvard.edu.

 

March 5, 2021

In person/Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, HSPH

Prof. Doug Brownfield lab., Harvard School of Public Health

 

Contact information:

Prof.  Doug Brownfield

brownfield@hsph.harvard.edu

Department of Environmental Health

MIPS Program, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
665 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115

Building 1, Ground Floor G7 & G10

lab website: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/brownfield-lab/

 

Project description:

Prof. Brownfield lab., studies how the lung development in mammals from embryonic time to adulthood. In particular, the interest is focused on understanding how the lung alveolar space is constructed during development and disrupted during diseases. The lab applies genetic tools in in-vivo mice models and in-vitro cell culture models as research approaches.

 

Duties:

In person: Mice lineages genotyping/PCR, immune-histochemistry (IHC) and immune-cytochemistry (ICC), fixed tissues sectioning. Previous wet lab experience is a plus.

Remotely: Imaging analysis for both static and time-lapses of 2D and 3D cell cultures and fixed lung tissues. Literature search, and animal database maintenance. Previous bioinformatic experience (ex. Matlab, R) is a plus.

 

Learning outcomes: The student will receive training for the tasks he/she is involved such as PCR/genotyping, IHC and ICC, the preparation of fixed tissues and imaging data analysis. During the apprenticeship the student will learn how to work an experimental protocol, how to analyze the data, how to present and critically discuss the results, how to collaborate in a scientific environment.

 

Number of hours

The student is expected to be in the lab daily and work ~40 hours/week; equivalent time should be allocated for the working remotely position. Flexibility is considered based on the candidate’s course load.

 

Mentoring:

The student will be mentored by Dr. Brownfield, who will check weekly on the student’s progress. Dr. Elisa Ghelfi will be the daily assistant-mentor for the lab and image analysis work. The student is expected to attend lab Zoom meeting, discuss his/her results and present data.

 

Student stipend: This is an unpaid, volunteer position.

 

Application information:

If interested, please direct your email with your CV/Resume to:

Dr. Brownfield (brownfield@hsph.harvard.edu)

Dr. Elisa Ghelfi (eghelfi@hsph.harvard.edu).

A cover letter detailing your scientific interests and career goals would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

Remote undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Vandana Gupta’s lab, BWH

Contact information: Vandana A Gupta and Division of Genetics, Email: vgupta@research.bwh.harvard.edu, 77 Avenue Louie Pasteur, NRB-1,  Lab website: https://guptalab.bwh.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: The project will include a detailed analysis of the clinical and pharmacological information of a cohort of patients affected with neuromuscular diseases to identify specific triggers contributing to the clinical presentation. Currently, this position is remote but in future may be expended to the experimental studies including analysis of the factors identified from this work in animal and cellular models.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required. 

Learning outcomes: Research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing. Students are encouraged to present their data in lab and division meetings and contribute to manuscripts.

Number of hours: Minimum 10 hours per week

Mentoring: PI and other lab members will provide the mentorship. Students are encouraged to attend weekly lab meetings (currently on zoom) and will have weekly mentorship matings.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position

Application information: Please email your resume to Vandana Gupta: vgupta@research.bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

March 4, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Hirschhorn’s Lab, Boston Children's Hospital

Contact information: Joel Hirschhorn, Department of Endocrinology, Joel.Hirschhorn@childrens.harvard.edu, Boston Children's Hospital Center for Life Science building 16th floor, https://www.joelhirschhornlab.org/

Project description and duties: Human genetics has the potential to uncover new disease biology and predict health outcomes. Genome-wide association studies have identified hundreds of thousands of genetic variants associated with human diseases and traits, but translating these associations to actionable biology is difficult. This project aims to use data from the world’s largest genome-wide association studies, of height and measures of obesity, to identify genes, pathways, and specific variants as likely to have causal influences on human weight regulation and skeletal growth. Depending on the background and interest of the student, analysis in biobank-scale sequence data, polygenic risk scores comprised of phenotypically similar subsets of associated variants, or integrated analysis of genetic and metabolite data may also be feasible. A strong background in computational skills, human/population genetics or (ideally) both will help the applicant be successful in this project.
Student will be expected to use available genetic and computational biology software, including cloud-based computing, to analyze large datasets and evaluate results.

Skills required: Computer Science and Biology background; preferably experience with Python or R, unix, and an interest in human genetics.

Learning outcomes: general research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing, as well as hands-on experience working with large human genetics datasets.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: negotiable, between 8-40 hours/wk. At least summer, but extended duration negotiable.

Mentoring: regular (daily-weekly) meetings with graduate student or postdoctoral fellow advisor, regular (1 per 2 weeks) meetings with PI and graduate student/postdoc advisor. Student is encouraged to attend lab meetings and present on work.

Student stipend: Stipend is available at standard Boston Children’s rates; students seeking a stipend are strongly encouraged to apply for any applicable summer research fellowships. Course credit: Students can also conduct research for course credit (however, a student cannot earn course credit and be paid a stipend in the same semester).

Application information: Email your resume to Dr. Joel Hirschhorn at Joel.Hirschhorn@childrens.harvard.edu

 

Feb 25, 2021

Scalable engineering of iPSC-derived living blood vessels / In person research opportunity, Prof. Elliot Chaikof lab, BIDMC/HMS
Contact information: Dr. Torsten Meissner, tmeissne@bidmc.harvard.edu

Project description and duties:

The goal of this project is to engineer immune-silent living blood vessels from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) that can be transplanted into all patients without the risk of immune rejection. With cardiovascular disease being on the rise and the number one cause of death in the developed world, the applications for such vessels are enormous, ranging from disease modelling, to drug screening, and vascular reconstruction.

The student will gain hands-on experience in culture and genetic manipulation of human iPSC and assist with their differentiation into endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, that can be used for tissue engineering, as well as their phenotypic characterization. The student will be embedded in a multidisciplinary research environment consisting of biologists, material scientists, engineers and medical professionals each providing a different expertise to the project.

(ACS Biomater Sci Eng. 2020, PMID: 32685675; PNAS USA. 2019, PMID: 31040209; Nat Cell Biol. 2015 PMID: 26214132)

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32685675/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31040209/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26214132/

Skills required:  Prior experience with basic molecular biology techniques, tissue culture, and/or coding (R) is a plus.
Learning outcomes: This internship experience will provide the student with the opportunity to learn:

  • Culture of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC)
  • Genetic modification of iPSC using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and various base editors
  • Directed differentiation of modified iPSC into vascular wall cells (endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells)
  • Tissue engineering of living vascular grafts using a collagen bioprinter
  • Characterization of the tissue grafts using single cell RNAseq as well as various immune assays

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project

Ideally, we are looking to establish a long-term relationship with a student for the duration of 1-2 years, that should result in the completion of a senior research thesis. We can work with the student and their schedule to decide on the number of hours per week during the school year but expect a full-time commitment of 2-3 months for at least one summer to allow for completion of an independent research project. The lab is located at the Center for Life Science (CLS) in Longwood, which is a 20 min ride on the M2 shuttle from the main campus.
Mentoring: Dr. Torsten Meissner will be the direct supervisor and mentor of the student. Dr. Meissner has a broad knowledge of stem cell engineering, cell differentiation and immunology, and will teach, guide and advise the student. In addition, he will video meet with the student weekly or as much as needed in person to discuss progress. The student will also have the opportunity to attend the Chaikof lab group meetings - currently via Zoom - and present their work at the end of the summer.
Student stipend: This is a volunteer position.
Application information:  Please e-mail your resume/CV along with a one-page cover letter including a brief outline of your previous experiences, interests, goals, and anticipated time availability to Dr. Meissner (tmeissne@bidmc.harvard.edu).

 

 

Feb 23, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Assistant, Collaboration between Harvard Medical School and Partners In Health

Contact information:  Bethany Hedt-Gauthier, PhD
Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Bethany_Gauthier@hms.harvard.edu
https://globalcovid19respo.wixsite.com/website

Project description and duties:
The overall goal of the work is to assess the impact of COVID-19 on patients with HIV or non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries. We are seeking two research assistants for this project. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the Partners In Health Cross-Site COVID Cohort Research Network, one research assistant would support a retrospective cohort of patients with non-communicable diseases living in Mexico while the second would support a retrospective cohort of patients with HIV in Haiti. The goal of these projects is to use electronic medical record data to assess how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected care utilization, care provision, and health outcomes among chronic care patients. Key responsibilities would include cleaning and processing de-identified datasets, generating reports describing the data, and attending meetings with our colleagues from Haiti and Mexico. The two research assistants would be encouraged to collaborate and support each other.

Skills required:

- Intermediate or advanced mathematical or statistical background

- Previous experience in Stata (desired), R, SAS, or similar

- Interest in global health and commitment to global health equity

- Self-directed worker

Learning outcomes: The successful candidate would build their quantitative analysis skills and gain exposure to global health research. The individual would have direct exposure of how quantitative analysis informs program design and delivery in these contexts. They would be invited to present their progress to colleagues in seven countries through the Cross-Site COVID Cohort Research Network working group.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: Students would be expected to work 20-40 hours per week during the summer, depending on the experience of the candidate. Hours can be flexible, though some team meetings would be required. There may be opportunity for this experience to continue past the summer, depending on the student’s goals and performance.

Mentoring: Students will be mentored by Dr. Dale Barnhart, an epidemiologist and co-founder of the Partners In Health Cross-Site COVID Cohort Research Network, and by Dr. Hedt-Gauthier, faculty at Harvard Medical School. Joint mentorship meetings will occur bi-weekly via zoom. The students may be able to attend other team meetings, based on interest and topics.

Student stipend: Volunteer position. We have no funding available for this position, but would be willing to help selected students identify funding mechanisms.

Application information: Please submit your cover letter (1 page), resume or CV, and a 1-2 page writing sample (topic does not matter) to Dale Barnhart at dale_barnhart@hms.harvard.edu. Please put: “Harvard Undergrad RA: LASTNAME” in the subject line. In your cover letter, please a) describe how this position fits into your overall education and professional goals and b) indicate whether you are applying specifically to the NCD or HIV position or if you are willing to be considered for either position.

 

Feb 22, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Neuroimaging and Deep Learning, Dr. Wang Lab, MGH

Contact information:

Dr. Hui Wang, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School/Massachusetts General Hospital, hwang47@mgh.harvard.edu, https://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/lab/lcn

Project description and duties:

Clinical evidences have substantially extended the functional scope of cerebellum from sensorimotor control to a wide range of cognitions and emotions. However, the underlying structural basis to support the cognitive functions has not been established in human, which hampers the development of targeted therapies. The project aims to develop a multi-scale imaging framework to elucidate the neuroarchitecture and connectivity maps of the human cerebellum. The framework pivots on the fusion of high-resolution ex vivo MRI and automated serial-sectioning polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (as-PSOCT) to enable tissue samples to be interrogated from single cells to the entire brain.

The undergraduate will be responsible for processing our high-resolution MRI data on the cerebellum, conducting learning-based segmentation for cerebellar structures, and working with our collaborator to create a model-based cerebellar surface.

Skills required:

The applicants should have engineering or computer science background, with demonstrated programing experience. Familiarity with Neuroimaging is a plus, but not necessary.

Learning outcomes:

  • Learn basic neuroanatomy and neuroimaging software
  • Develop skills in using deep learning and image segmentation tools
  • Practice presentation and scientific writing skills

Number of hours:

Students are expected to work full time for 10 weeks between June and August. The start date is negotiable.

Mentoring:

Dr. Wang will mentor the undergraduate and meet with the student weekly via zoom. The student will remotely interact with research technicians and postdocs in the lab. The student is invited to attend weekly lab meeting and present the work at the end of the summer.

Student stipend:

Volunteer. Funding can be available if the student likes to continue the work in the following semester.

Application information:

Please email a statement of interest and your CV to hwang47@mgh.harvard.edu

 

Feb 18, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity on Forced Migration and Antenatal Care, FXB Center For Health and Human Rights at Harvard, HSPH

PI :  Pr. Jacqueline Bhabha, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard, HSPH, https://fxb.harvard.edu

Contact person:  Dr. Vasileia Digidiki, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard, HSPH,  vdigidik@hsph.harvard.edu

Project descriptionAccess to timely antenatal care is considered an effective method to ensure successful pregnancy outcomes, as well as lifelong health for mothers and their children. However, in the context of humanitarian crises, asylum seeking women face significant barriers to accessing antenatal care leading to a series of poor perinatal outcomes and risks to the health of both young mothers and their babies, furthering health inequalities for this vulnerable population. This differentially influences several perinatal health outcomes including mental health, mortality of both mother and child, mode of delivery, birth weight, preterm birth, congenital anomalies, and other morbidities. As the pandemic has already disrupted humanitarian operations in the field, including access to health services in informal and formal camps, it is expected that the antenatal care experience of asylum seeking women has been further deteriorated. 

This exploratory study seeks to make visible the lived experiences of Central- American asylum seeking pregnant women stranded at three critical transit cities at the US- Mexican borders: Monterrey, Tijuana and Matamoros. Given the significant number of pregnant women stranded in these cities in perilous and often informal settings for prolonged periods of time, the study aims to explore  current access to antenatal care and document the impact of the pandemic on their antenatal care experiences.

Duties of the Research Assistant: The research assistant will contribute to the review of the existing literature, participate in the process of data collection (data collection will take place through Zoom) under supervision and assist with transcription and translation of the collected data. They will also be trained in data analysis and contribute to the writing up of findings as needed.

Skills required:   Applicants should be fluent in Spanish and English.  No prior research experience is needed. 

Learning outcomes: The Research assistant will enhance their knowledge on forced migration and antenatal care during the pandemic, develop skills on data collection and data analysis, and improve their scientific writing.

Number of hours  The research assistant will be asked to engage during data collection which will take place between mid-March to May. For this period of time we anticipate a time commitment of 10-14 hours per week. After that, the research assistant is expected to spend 6-8 hours a week on this project.

Length of the project: March- July

MentoringThe Research Assistant will be mentored by the PI and the Project Leader. The research assistant will have the opportunity to attend regular Zoom meetings, the frequency of which will depend on the immediate needs  of the project. (eg. During data collection, meetings may be more frequent).  

Student stipendThis is a volunteer position

Application informationE-mail your CV and cover letter describing yourself and your experience to Dr Vasileia Digidiki, vdigidik@hsph.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Clinical Data Science Research Opportunity, Dr. Crowson’s Lab, Mass Eye & Ear

Contact information:
Matthew G. Crowson MD MPA MASc FRCSC

Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery
243 Charles Street
Boston, Massachusetts
02114 USA

Email: matthew_crowson@meei.harvard.edu

Laboratory Website: https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/crow/people/matthew-g-crowson

Harvard Catalyst Profile: https://connects.catalyst.harvard.edu/Profiles/display/Person/193106

Project description and duties:

Dr. Crowson’s work involves applying data science techniques (i.e. machine learning and its various forms) to clinical data. Dr. Crowson has several ongoing projects including innovative applications of:

-Computer vision for image segmentation as part of autonomous surgery,

-Natural Language Processing for clinical notes,

-Among others.

Dr. Crowson also performs ‘traditional’ clinical research using existing clinical data from the electronic health record. Further, Dr. Crowson also generates systematic reviews and other review-style manuscripts of interest to the machine learning and Otolaryngology fields.

Example prior projects:

Crowson MG, Dixon P, Mahmood R, Lee JW, Shipp D, Le T, Lin V, Chen J, Chan TCY. Predicting Postoperative Cochlear Implant Performance Using Supervised Machine Learning. Otol Neurotol. 2020 Sep; 41(8):e1013-e1023. PMID: 32558750.

Crowson MG, Lee JW, Hamour A, Mahmood R, Babier A, Lin V, Tucci DL, Chan TCY. AutoAudio: Deep Learning for Automatic Audiogram Interpretation. J Med Syst. 2020 Aug 07; 44(9):163. PMID: 32770269.

Crowson MG, Hamour A, Lin V, Chen JM, Chan TCY. Machine learning for pattern detection in cochlear implant FDA adverse event reports. Cochlear Implants Int. 2020 11; 21(6):313-322. PMID: 32623971.

Skills required:

Some experience with statistics and computer programming languages such as Python or R strongly recommended. Students do not necessarily need to consider medicine as a possible career, as computer science and engineering students would also benefit from such an experience.  Experience with machine learning techniques preferred.
Learning outcomes:

Goals for this research experience is to improve competency in data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing. Deliverables such as 1-2 peer reviewed manuscripts with student serving as first-author on the manuscript if work completed. The student may complete additional manuscripts if motivated.

Relevant texts for methods of the lab:

* Applied Predictive Modeling. by Max Kuhn and Kjell Johnson. ISBN-10: 1461468485

* R for Data Science: Import, Tidy, Transform, Visualize, and Model Data by Hadley Wickham and Garrett Grolemund. ISBN-10: 1491910399
Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project

Negotiable.
Mentoring:

Dr. Crowson, the principal investigator, will be the primary mentor. Research meetings will be held weekly, as well as continued daily contact using a mobile/web-based platform (e.g. Discord or Slack).
Student stipend:

Pending Mass General Brigham HR policies.
Application information:

Email your resume/CV to Dr. Crowson at matthew_crowson@meei.harvard.edu. Please also include a 1-2 paragraph statement of i) what you hope to get out of this research experience, and ii) ideas for future career plans.

 

 

On site research project in laboratory of Dr. Lichterfeld and Dr. Xu Yu at Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard

Contact information: Mathias Lichterfeld (mlichterfeld@mgh.harvard.edu, https://www.ragoninstitute.org/portfolio-item/lichterfeld/) and Xu Yu (xyu@partners.org; https://www.ragoninstitute.org/portfolio-item/yu-lab)

Project description and duties: Lab focuses on HIV cure research and uses wide spectrum of novel single-cell analytic techniques for characterizing HIV-infected cells. Summer students will be involved in performing PCR assays, gel electrophoresis and other biological experiments under supervision; generating figures and presentations. Experience can be customized to applicants interests and skills

Skills required: some prior experience with basic laboratory techniques and basic knowledge in biostatistics and coding/computational data analysis helpful

Learning outcomes: understanding next-generation sequencing technologies, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours 20-40 hours per week

Mentoring: In person meetings with lab personnel, typically technicians, postdocs and PI

Student stipend: Stipend is available

Application information: Email resume and description of interests to Dr. Lichterfeld or Dr. Yu

 

Feb 17, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Surgical Localization and Mapping Lab, BWH

Contact information: Haoyin Zhou and Jayender Jagadeesan, Radiology department, email: zhouhaoyin@bwh.harvard.edujayender@bwh.harvard.edu, 75 Francis Street, Boston MA 02115

Project description and duties: The project involves the development of a novel machine learning algorithm to estimate depth information from stereo laparoscopy videos, which can be further applied to surgical navigation systems. The candidate will be responsible for the design and development of the algorithms.

Skills required: Engineering students with a strong background in computer science and artificial intelligence are encouraged to apply. Students needs to be familiar with Python programming and PyTorch. Prior experience in C++ programming will be advantageous but not necessary.

Learning outcomes: This position provides an excellent opportunity to be involved in cutting-edge research in surgical navigation, and offers a stimulating environment to work closely with engineers, computer scientists, radiologists and surgeons. The position also offers the opportunity of observing surgical procedures in our state-of-the-art operating room using intraoperative imaging. The candidate will also gain valuable written and oral communication skills, and the possibility for co-authorship on publications.

Number of hours: The candidate is expected to work 8 hours a day for 4 months during the period of internship. The working hours are negotiable.

Mentoring: Dr. Zhou and Dr. Jagadeesan will be mentoring the undergraduate. Dr. Jagadeesan conducts daily stand-up for a few minutes with the entire team to discuss any outstanding issues and future research directions.

Student stipend: The position is a volunteer position. However, a stipend could be offered.  

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Zhou at zhouhaoyin@bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in the Aizenberg Biomineralization and Biomimetics Lab

Contact information: Prof.Joanna Aizenberg, jaiz@seas.harvard.edu, aizenberglab.seas.harvard.edu

Background

The Aizenberg Group at Harvard University is known to apply or adapt phenomena found in Nature to industrial or medical needs, and conduct a high-risk, fundamental research and science-driven technology development. One of the major foci of the group is to translate the technologies developed by its group members into commercial products and therapies through collaborations with internal and external researchers, as well as industry partners.

Job Description

The Aizenberg Lab at Harvard University seeks a hard-working, creative, and motivated individual to work as a member of a team developing novel biomaterial design for medical implants. Working under the supervision of research staff, this position will allow you to explore various aspects of translational medicine research, e. g. in the field of glaucoma and hydrocephalus shunts and other conduit-like implants for drainage and drug delivery. Research will include understanding the landscape of state-of-the-art devices and their limitations. We are looking for a student who is eager to assist our team with ongoing development and evaluations of medical implants.

Skills required

  • Interest in Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Physics, or related field, as well as in medical device design, laboratory testing of medical devices is desired but not required.
  • Ability to work in a small team as well as leading tasks individually

Learning outcomes:

  • Review and analysis of scientific and medical publications,
  • Experimental study design, data analysis and reporting
  • Preparing scientific presentations

Number of hours:  Negotiable.

Mentoring: Mentoring will be managed by Haritosh Patel and Dr. Ida Pavlichenko.

Student stipend: NA

Application information: Email your resume to Prof. Joanna Aizenberg jaiz@seas.harvard.edu (please cc Dr. Ida Pavlichenko ida@seas.harvard.edu)

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Surgical Localization and Mapping Lab, BWH

Contact information: Jayender Jagadeesan and Radiology department, email: jayender@bwh.harvard.edu, 75 Francis Street, Boston MA 02115

Project description and duties: The project involves the development of a novel modular robotic manipulator to treat kidney stones. The candidate will be responsible for the design and development of the robotic device and associated control algorithms.

Skills required: Engineering students with a strong background in mechanical, computer or electrical engineering are encouraged to apply. Prior experience in mechanical design, control systems will be advantageous but not necessary. 

Learning outcomes: This position provides an excellent opportunity to be involved in cutting-edge research in medical robotics and surgical navigation, and offers a stimulating environment to work closely with engineers, computer scientists, radiologists and surgeons. The position also offers the opportunity of observing surgical procedures in our state-of-the-art operating room using intraoperative imaging. The candidate will also gain valuable written and oral communication skills, and the possibility for co-authorship on publications. 

Number of hours: The candidate is expected to work 8 hours a day for 4 months during the period of internship. The working hours are negotiable. 

Mentoring: Dr. Jagadeesan will be mentoring the undergraduate. Dr. Jagadeesan conducts daily stand-up for a few minutes with the entire team to discuss any outstanding issues and future research directions.

Student stipend: The position is a volunteer position. However, a stipend could be offered.  

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Jagadeesan at jayender@bwh.harvard.edu

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Marcia Goldberg, MGH

Contact information: Marcia B. Goldberg, Infectious Disease Division, Departments of Medicine and Microbiology, marcia.goldberg@mgh.harvard.edu, Harvard Institutes of Medicine building, 4 Blackfan Circle, Room 847, Boston, MA, goldberglab.med.harvard.edu or https://www.massgeneral.org/medicine/infectious-diseases/research-and-in...

Project description and duties: Mix of molecular biology, cell biology, microbiology, and immunology.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcomes: Students will learn study design, a variety of experimental approaches, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Negotiable.

Mentoring: Direct mentoring by postdoctoral fellow; weekly meetings to discuss research progress and research directions with PI; encouraged to attend research group Zoom meetings.

Student stipend: Position is a paid position.

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Goldberg at marcia.goldberg@mgh.harvard.edu

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity: In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Perfusion Imaging of Brain Tumors - Dr. Eva-Maria Ratai Lab, MGH

Contact information:  Eva-Maria Ratai, PhD
Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital,
A. A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging  Building 149, 13th Street, Room 230, Charlestown, MA 02129
Phone: (617) 726-1744 Email: eratai@mgh.harvard.edu
lab website https://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/lab/ratailab

Project description and duties:

We are looking for Harvard undergraduate students in Life Sciences who are interested in conducting research related to Neuroimaging.

Glioblastomas (GBM) are challenging cancers to treat, and positive clinical outcome in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme continues to be low.  One of the most informative imaging tools to monitor treatment response or treatment failure in brain tumors such as GBM is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).  MRI is a non-invasive technique primarily used in medical settings to produce high quality images of the inside of the human body. In addition, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a promising imaging technique that enables investigators to determine the presence and amount of specific metabolites. Thus, MRS provides information about the metabolic activity of tumors, and may give physicians critical insight into tumor activity. Ref: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3688017 and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29902200

Skills required:

No prior research experience is required 

Learning outcomes:  This work will provide the candidate with research experience in neuroimaging. Mentees will learn, study design, data analysis methods (including MATLAB, R, LCModel, FSL, NordicIce, 3D-Slicer., JMP etc.), presentations, and scientific writing. The work may lead to a conference abstract and papers and will aid in her/his future career as neuroscientist or physician.

Number of hours:  Negotiable

Mentoring:  The student will work under direct supervision of Dr. Eva-Maria Ratai who holds the title of Clinical Spectroscopist at MGH for >17 years. Furthermore, the candidate will work with MGH radiologists and neurologists on this project. The candidate will attend biweekly zoom group meetings

Student stipend:  This is a volunteer position. However, Harvard College Research Program (HCRP) https://uraf.harvard.edu/hcrp-application-instructions  and PRISE https://uraf.harvard.edu/summer-residential-research-programs research fellowships will continue to sponsor student stipends during the summer of 2021.

Application information:  Please email resume to Dr. Ratai  eratai@mgh.harvard.edu

 

Remote Undergraduate Medical Education Research Opportunity, Dr. Miya Bernson-Leung, BCH

Contact information: Miya Bernson-Leung, MD, EdM, Department of Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital

Project description and duties: Although pediatric neurological disorders are common, especially in children with complex health care needs, the training of general pediatricians and other non-neurologists provides limited exposure to pediatric neurology. One of my projects to address this need focuses on the teaching of the pediatric neurological examination to residents in general pediatrics through an observed examination experience.

I have developed a structured observation form to support this, but would welcome a student to take the lead on the next steps in validating the form. This would involve editing a collection of video recordings of sample neurological examinations, coordinating a group of neurologists to rate the recorded examinations using the form, and collecting their responses and assessing the form’s effectiveness for this purpose. Depending on interest and availability the student could also be involved in assessing the overall impact of this observed examination program, and in writing it up for publication in the medical education literature.

Skills required: No prior research experience required. Experience with basic video editing and data collection and management (e.g. survey creation tools such as Qualtrics or SurveyMonkey, spreadsheets) preferred, or willingness to learn. Some statistical knowledge helpful but not essential. Good organizational and communication skills.

Learning outcomes:

Broadly applicable research skills such as understanding how to collect meaningful data about the outcomes of interventions through validated instruments, presentation and writing skills, and data and project management. Familiarity with fundamentals of general education and medical education research and scholarship, with deeper exposure to this literature if manuscript preparation is of interest.

Number of hours: flexible

Mentoring: Dr. Bernson-Leung will mentor the student through a combination of email exchanges and regular Zoom calls. Virtual clinical shadowing opportunities may also be possible for students interested in medical careers, as well as invitations to medical education events of interest.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position but I am happy to support students’ applications for external funding opportunities or course credit.

Application information: Please email your resume and a brief description of your interest in the project to Dr. Bernson-Leung at miya.bernson-leung@childrens.harvard.edu.

 

Feb 11, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, MGH Biostatistics Center and Harvard Medical School

Contact information: Marie-Abele Bind, MGH Biostatistics Center, https://scholar.harvard.edu/marie-abele

Project description and duties: Development or applications of causal inference methods and software for quantifying the effects of randomized or non-randomized exposures (e.g., air pollution, temperature) on outcomes (e.g., fatal accident, crime, mortality).

Skills required: No prior research experience required. New undergraduate researchers and candidates with basic understanding of probability and statistics, and with some experience in R programming are encouraged to apply.

Learning outcomes: R programming skills, research skills such as study design for causal inference in randomized and non-randomized studies, statistical analysis methods (Fisherian, Neymanian, and Bayesian inference), presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Negotiable. Ideally, students are expected to work 5 to 10 hours a week. Length of the project: at least one semester.

Mentoring: Dr. Bind will be mentoring the undergraduate with the help of Dr. Young Lee (Post-doc). Weekly or bi-weekly mentorship meetings. Students are encouraged to attend group meetings.

Student stipend: Unpaid position. Students are encourage to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities.

Course credit: Students can conduct research for course credit.

Application information: Students should email their resume to Dr. Bind at ma.bind@mail.harvard.edu

 

Research Opportunity - Pilot Testing a Reporting System for Legal Intervention Homicides - Harvard Injury Control Research Center (David Hemenway, Co-Director), HSPH

Contact information: Catherine Barber cbarber@hsph.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: Death certificate and FBI data currently underreport deaths that occur at the hands of police and other law enforcement personnel ("legal intervention homicides"). The CDC's National Violent Death Reporting System captures these deaths well, but the system does not code important elements of these incidents, such as why the police and the subject were brought together, what the highest level of harm or threat the subject posed to police and to civilians, and what the specific precipitant was that led to the use of lethal force. The Harvard Injury Control Research Center has drafted a Legal Intervention module for the NVDRS and conducted limited pilot testing on it. A few state NVDRS offices are now interested in pilot-testing it using police and coroner/medical examiner reports. HICRC seeks a student to help coordinate this process. Specific duties include organizing project meetings, recording decisions, helping to design a common data entry interface, analyzing completion rates on specific variables, providing technical assistance on coding questions, updating the coding manual as needed, soliciting input from participating states on improvements to the module, and helping to finalize the module that will be recommended to the CDC. 

Skills requiredStrong organizational skills in coordinating a multi-site project. Some knowledge of data entry tools, like Qualtrics, and basic knowledge of data analysis software helpful, but not necessary if these are skills the student is interested learning and has some natural capability for.

Learning outcomes: Understanding of how to build and test a surveillance system to track a public health problem. Greater knowledge about police shootings and other legal intervention deaths.

Number of hours & schedule: Flexible

Mentoring: Catherine Barber will supervise the student; student will also attend Zoom meetings of the participating state Violent Death Reporting System offices and can opt to attend relevant meetings of the Harvard Injury Control Research Center. 

Student stipend: No funds available.

Application informationPlease email your resume or CV to cbarber@hsph.harvard.edu

 

 

Feb 10, 2021

Lee Kum Sheung Center for Health and Happiness Summer Internship Program, HSPH

Contact information: Lee Kum Sheung Center for Health and Happiness, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, centerhealthhappiness@hsph.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: The Lee Kum Sheung Center for Health and Happiness Summer Internship Program offers training and support to a future generation of scholars interested in studying (1) the linkages between mental well-being and physical health outcomes, and (2) the translation of science related to these linkages to inform policy and practice. Examples of past projects include:

  • A meta-analysis on mindfulness interventions and subsequent physical activity level
  • Data cleaning, entry, and extraction for a resilience intervention study
  • A literature review on psychosocial factors to reduce physician burnout
  • Transcription of mock interviews to test a new software

Skills required: Prior research experience is helpful, but not required.

Learning outcomes: research skills such as data analysis, data cleaning/entry, data collection, and science writing

Number of hours: Up to 20 hours per week for 10 weeks. The internship runs June – August 2021. However, the dates are somewhat flexible if applicants have summer vacation plans or other commitments. Once selected, interns can work with their internship host and the Center to extend the internship beyond August 2021, but the work is not to exceed 20 hours/week for 10 weeks in total.

Mentoring: Students will be placed with Center researchers and/or Science Affiliates working on projects related to the Center’s mission. The Center will be responsible for the logistics associated with the internship, as well as mentorship and guidance to interns via bi-weekly meetings over the summer. These additional mentorship opportunities will provide interns with a sense of community, opportunities for connecting and networking, and professional development.

Student stipend: Due to the ongoing pandemic, we are not sure yet if this will be a paid or unpaid opportunity. In summer 2020, the Harvard hiring freeze prevented us from offering paid positions, so our ability to do so in summer 2021 will depend on whether or not this policy is still in place. If interns are unpaid, they must be able to receive course credit for their work. In addition, while we hope that interns will be able to work in person, they may need to work remotely, depending on Harvard guidance on travel and in-person work this summer. We appreciate your flexibility as we wait to see how things may change over the coming months.

Application information: Please visit our website for the full application.

 

 

Integrative analysis of ALS plasma metabolomics using machine learning, MIT

Position title: Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Fraenkel Lab, MIT

Contact information: Ernest Fraenkel (Professor of Biological Engineering, MIT), fraenkel@mit.edu, http://fraenkel.mit.edu

Project description and duties:

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) has been shown to involve metabolic dysregulation. Previous studies have identified metabolic signatures in ALS that may correspond with disease severity, although the molecular processes behind these metabolic differences is unclear. We aim to use data science approaches to investigate if there are differences between ALS patients and healthy controls at the biological-pathway level.

The undergraduate will be responsible for developing and applying integrative network-based algorithms on metabolomics and proteomic data from a cohort of ALS patients. This undergraduate project consists of two stages, that can be modified based on the students’ interests: 1) implementing an established network algorithm on metabolomic and proteomic data from ALS patients 2) developing their own methods based on graph-based neural networks for identifying ALS biomarkers. This project is fully computational, and can be conducted remotely.

Skills required: Experience with Python required; familiarity with introductory biology principles and/or machine learning preferred

Learning outcomes:

  • Learn algorithms for integrating metabolomic and proteomic data
  • Develop skills in machine learning models, especially in using graph neural networks for biological datasets
  • Experience presenting their research and practice in scientific writing

Number of hours students are expected to work: 10 hours/week, Spring semester (hours and duration negotiable)

Mentoring: The undergraduate will be mentored by a senior PhD student in the lab. They are required to attend weekly mentorship zoom check-ins, and are strongly encouraged to attend weekly research group zoom meetings.

Student stipend: Available

Application information: Email your resume and an unofficial transcript to Ernest Fraenkel at fraenkel@mit.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity: Computer recreation of the beginning of life, Dr. Megason Lab, HMS

Contact information: Sean Megason, Dept of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School. megason@hms.harvard.edu, www.digitalfish.org

Project description and duties:

Life begins when the single cell egg is fertilized by a sperm which triggers it to divide repeatedly until there are tens to thousands (depending on the species) of seemingly equivalent cells that then go on to adopt different identities. During this early cleavage stage, cells divide in stereotypic, but not invariant, lineages. To what extent these cell lineage patterns can be explained by mechanical/geometrical influences on cell shape and division orientation vs. molecular determinants remains an open question. In this project, we will attempt to computationally simulate cell division, cell adhesion, and cell shape from a physics (but not genetic) perspective from the 1 cell to 4000 cell stage of zebrafish embryogenesis to explore to what extent physics vs genetics controls early development. We will use Python scripts of a popular open-source, 3D computer animation package called Blender to create Pixar like movies of the first stage of life. Our goal is to simulate the first 4 hours of this movie of zebrafish development- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeHiA98yUa4

Skills required: Python programming. Some knowledge of biology, physics, and computer graphics useful.

Learning outcomes: Students will learn computational modeling of multicellular systems

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project
Working hours and duration of project are flexible

Mentoring:
Mentoring will be by Dr. Megason. Students will also have the opportunity to attend the Megason Lab group meetings and present their work at the end of the summer.

Student stipend: Volunteer

Application information:

Please email a statement of interest and your CV to megason@hms.harvard.edu

 

Measuring fundamental planet parameters of a multi-planet system discovered by NASA’s TESS mission

Contact information:

Dr. Ryan Cloutier

Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (CfA)

60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA, 02138

ryan.cloutier@cfa.harvard.edu

https://exoplanets.cfa.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

NASAs TESS mission has discovered a pair of planet candidates orbiting a nearby low mass star. These planet candidates have unique sizes and orbital separations indicating that their bulk compositions are likely distinct as well. The goals of this project are to measure the physical and orbital properties of these planets and to use those results to inform our understanding of how these types of planetary systems form. We are seeking an undergraduate student with an interest in exoplanets and in data analysis to analyze the available data that we have procured of this system in order to measure the planets’ fundamental parameters.

Skills required:

The successful applicant will have a basic working knowledge of computer programming. Experience with python or other similar scripting languages is an asset.

Learning outcomes:

The goal is to gain practical experience with observational research in astronomy. Skill development will include data analysis via computer programming, problem-solving, and science communication via writing and presentations.

Number of hours:

Students are expected to work full time throughout the project duration. Depending on the source of funding, the exact dates can vary but typically last 10 weeks from June to August.

Mentoring:

The successful applicant will be directly advised by the PI, Dr Ryan Cloutier. Faculty support will also be provided by Prof. David Charbonneau. If in-person work is permitted during the summer, the student will be expected to work at the CfA for the full duration of the program. If not, the research can be conducted remotely with regular Zoom meetings between the student and PI. The student will also be encouraged to attend weekly group meetings.

Student stipend:

Internal funding may be available but we encourage students to pursue external funding sources which are available through the SAO REU program and the Origins of Life Initiative, among others. Please contact the PI for more details.

Application information:

Applicants must email their application to the PI at ryan.cloutier@cfa.harvard.edu. Please include a brief cover letter (1-page max) indicating your academic interests and career aspirations, along with a copy of your CV, and a copy of your undergraduate transcript.

 

 

Feb 9, 2021

Instrumentation Development for Rubin Observatory, Chile

Contact information: Christopher Stubbs, Department of Physics & Department of Astronomy, Lab is 106 McKay building. https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/stubbs/home

Project description and duties: We are seeking one or more students to help us develop a network of sensors (temperature, atmospheric pressure, vibration) that will be installed at the Rubin observatory in Chile. These devices interface over USB to a data collection machine which is part of a wireless network.

Skills required: Good competency in Python programming is a must, experience with the Linux operating system is a plus.

Learning outcomes: Students will gain experience in instrumentation, systems engineering, technical communications, and working in a team environment.

Number of hours: A minimum commitment of 5-6 hours per week is expected. We hope to have someone start this Spring term.

Mentoring: Students are welcome to attend (remote) weekly group meetings, and will hold additional meetings with group members as needed to support this work. The project will culminate in a written report and a presentation to the Rubin Observatory project team.

Student stipend: This is a paid position.

Application information: If interested, please send a cover letter and CV (including a description of programming proficiency and experience) to Christopher Stubbs at stubbs@g.harvard.edu

 

 

On-site and virtual Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Marcia Haigis Lab, HMS

Contact information: Marcia Haigis (Cell Biology Department), Marcia_Haigis@hms.harvard.edu, LHRRB 300, https://haigis.hms.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: Project is to study cancer metabolism and T cell metabolism by using biochemical methods and mass spectrometry. Duties will be conducting hands-on research such as western blotting, molecular cloning, cell culture and virtual mass spectrometry data analysis.

Skills required: Biology, Chemistry or Biochemistry background. Previous hands-on experiences preferred but not required.

Learning outcomes: research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Flexible, preferentially at least 3hr a day, 3-4 days a week. Minimum of 10 hours/week during semester. Maximum of full-time during the summer.

Mentoring: Student will be working under the mentorship of a postdoctoral fellow. Mentorship meeting will take place weekly, and in lab daily. The student will be able to participate in all lab research meetings, including weekly group meeting, weekly discussion group meeting and journal clubs.

Student stipend: Volunteer position, with opportunities to apply for summer research fellowships.

Application information: Please provide a CV with a brief description of how your education and research background may fit in with this position.

 

 

In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Prof. Vamsi Mootha’s Lab, MGH/Broad/HMS/HHMI

Contact information: Prof. Vamsi Mootha, vamsi@hms.harvard.edu, Department of Molecular Biology, 185 Cambridge Street 6th Floor Boston, MA 02114, https://mootha.med.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: The Mootha Laboratory is seeking motivated Harvard undergraduates to conduct research with a dynamic team of ~30 post-doctoral researchers, clinical fellows, graduate students and research scientists. The laboratory combines the latest tools of genomics, computation, and biochemical physiology to systematically investigate mitochondria — key organelles in our body that are crucial for energy metabolism and linked to rare diseases, neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, and aging. Our lab spans very basic biology and mechanisms to translational efforts aimed at alleviating disease. The student will work closely with a senior researcher on CRISPR screening, mammalian cell-based assay development, and in-depth studies of systems metabolism and bioenergetics. This is a rare opportunity to be a part of a dynamic and cutting-edge research team with ample opportunity for co-authorship on important publications. Ideal for undergraduates who want to gain research experience for pursuing a career as a researcher or physician.

Skills required: Students majoring in biology, molecular biology, chemistry, or biochemistry are encouraged to apply. Candidates with research experience in a laboratory are highly preferred, but this is not required. Scientific aptitude, attention to detail, excellent communication skills, and enthusiasm are a must.

Learning outcomes: Students will learn how to design and perform wet-lab experiments, how to analyze and present their data, and how to prepare figures and text for a scholarly article

Number of hours: Number of hours/week is negotiable.

Mentoring: A senior researcher will work closely with the student on a day-to-day basis. Attendance at group meetings

Student stipend: Subject to discussion, and the student is encouraged to apply for internal Harvard and outside fellowships.

Application information: Please send a CV and a cover letter to Dr. Tsz-Leung To (tto@broadinstitute.org) and Dr. Anna Kotrys (kotrys@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu) in the Mootha Lab

 

 

In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cheng Lab, MGH

Contact information: Leo L. Cheng, Departments of Radiology and Pathology, Charlestown Navy Yard, MGH

Project description and duties: 1). Cellular metabolomics studies of Alzheimer’s disease with mouse models; and 2). Analysis of grain metabolomics; all with NMR spectroscopy.

Skills required: No prior research experience is expected and required, but an organic chemistry level understanding will be helpful.

Learning outcomes: As independent mini-size projects, students will learn research skills including study design, data measurements and analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing for publications.

Number of hours: Project scales will be determined according to students’ availabilities, spring, summer or even longer.

Mentoring: Students will under the PI’s direct guidance.

Student stipend: Can be considered depending on the funding situation at time.

Application information: Please contact: Leo Cheng, PhD, at 617-724-6593 or lcheng@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Research Opportunity –Eye Image Analysis by Deep Learning

Contact information:

Dr. Gang Luo

Department of Ophthalmology

Harvard Medical School

https://researchers.masseyeandear.org/details/327/gang-luo

Project description and duties:

We are developing smartphone based vision screening technologies, which have great application potentials in tele-medicine and tele-health. https://tvst.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2724671

In this particular research opportunity, we will be training a deep neural network for eye feature segmentation, such as eye lid, cornea, and pupil.

Skills required: Students are expected to understand the deep learning and have some experience with neural network training.

Learning outcomes:

Gain more experience on AI.

Number of hours

At least 20 hours per week remotely.

Mentoring:

PI and a junior faculty member will mentor the intern student. Weekly zoom meeting is planned.

Student stipend:

Volunteer position.

Application information:

Please directly contact PI at gang_luo@meei.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Research Opportunity – 3D Street Mapping for Visually Impaired

Contact information:

Dr. Gang Luo

Department of Ophthalmology

Harvard Medical School

https://researchers.masseyeandear.org/details/327/gang-luo

Project description and duties:

High definition maps used by autonomous vehicles are 3D maps of the environment. It can help self-driving cars to precisely determine locations and orientations with accuracy much better than GPS. Similarly, the map can also help to localize the position of pedestrians with body mounted camera. Potential applications include assisted navigation for visually impaired

In this particular research opportunity, we will create high definition point cloud map for a quarter-mile street segment. The map will be used in our mobility studies involved with visually impaired people.

Skills required: Students should have some basic coding skills (Python, Java, or Matlab).

Learning outcomes:

Gain some computer vision knowledge.

Number of hours

At least 20 hours per week remotely.

Mentoring:

PI and a junior faculty member will mentor the intern student. Weekly zoom meeting is planned.

Student stipend:

Volunteer position.

Application information:

Please directly contact PI at gang_luo@meei.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Summer Research Project, The Massachusetts Host-Microbiome Center

Massachusetts Host-Microbiome Center

Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School

http://www.host-microbiome.org/

Position: summer, full time

Posting date: Feb 8th, 2021

Start date: May-June 2021

Undegraduate Summer Research Project: The Massachusetts Host-Microbiome Center supports basicscience,

pre-clinical and human studies defining how the microbiota affects health and human disease. The

summer position will evaluate transposon libraries in commensal species of gut anaerobes for use in in vivo

mouse studies. Candidates will have an opportunity to learn cutting-edge techniques in anaerobic microbiology,

bacterial genetics, high-throughput ‘omic analyses and gnotobiotic colonization models.

Successful candidates must have good organizational, quantitative, and communication skills and

capacity to work effectively within a team environment. The position offers the opportunity to further develop

skills in anaerobic microbiology, host-microbiome systems, experimental design, and taking findings forward to

publication.

To apply, please submit the following to Dr. Lynn Bry, lbry @ bwh.harvard.edu:

1. A cover letter responsive to this posting describing your education, including any labs or prior research

relevant to the position, and long-term career goals

2. Curriculum Vitae (CV)

3. Undergraduate transcript

4. Recent graduates must have taken chemistry, organic chemistry, calculus, and either microbiology, genetics

or biochemistry, and maintained at least a 3.2 GPA in your major courses

Brigham and Women’s Hospital is an Equal Opportunity Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment

without regard to race, sex, color, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, protected veteran status, or on the basis of disability.

 

 

Technical Undergraduate Research Assistant, Dr. Martha Bulyk Laboratory, BWH

There is a technical research assistant position available in the laboratory of Prof. Martha Bulyk for a highly motivated individual with prior on-the-job experience in a molecular biology research lab. The lab is in the Division of Genetics at Brigham & Women’s Hospital, part of the Harvard Medical School research community located at the Longwood Medical Area in Boston, MA. This position will focus on studies of protein-DNA interactions and DNA regulatory elements primarily by in vitro and potentially by in vivo approaches, focusing on human. These data will aid in understanding mechanisms of transcriptional gene regulation and the impact of genetic variation and splicing on gene expression and phenotypes, including breast cancer and other diseases.

Required skills include: preparation of solutions and media, growth of bacterial cultures, DNA minipreps, preparation of DNA samples for Sanger sequencing and analysis of sequencing results, transformation of bacterial cells, preparation of E. coli glycerol stocks, restriction enzyme based or Gateway recombinational DNA cloning, PCR, DNA and protein gel electrophoresis, Coomassie staining of protein gels, Western blots. Prior experience with the following techniques would be helpful: expression and purification of recombinant proteins, protein biochemistry, protein-DNA binding assays, preparation of Illumina sequencing libraries, DNA or protein sequence analysis, and mammalian cell culture.  Other duties will include maintaining equipment and supplies.

This position provides an excellent opportunity to be involved in cutting-edge research in transcriptional regulation and genomics, and offers a stimulating, academic environment, and the opportunity to work in a team setting involving experimental and computational scientists. This position also offers the opportunity to gain valuable written and oral communication skills, and the possibility for co-authorship on publications and future supervisory roles. This position is ideal for a candidate graduating this year or a recent college graduate seeking to gain additional laboratory research experience.

A recent Bachelor of Science degree in a biological science or related field is required.  Applicants with a Bachelor’s degree in another area of concentration may be considered if the applicant has had significant coursework in the sciences, has the required prior laboratory work experience, and demonstrates strong potential. Applicant must have basic Linux proficiency and some computer programming experience. A flexible work schedule is required. Fluent command of spoken and written English is absolutely required.

To apply for this position, please submit a science resume to Dr. Bulyk mlbulyk@genetics.med.harvard.edu.

 

 

Feb 5, 2021

In-person/Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Liron Bar-Peled, MGH/HMS

Contact Information: Dr. Liron Bar-Peled, lbar-peled@mgh.harvard.edu; 149 13th St. Charlestown, MA 02141; MGH Cancer Center; barpeledlab.org

Project description and duties: Dr. Bar-Peled seeks exceptionally motivated candidates who enjoy conducting research and involving themselves in the dynamic and intellectual environment of the laboratory. The laboratory studies the cellular response to altered metabolic states in multiple cancer models. Specific studies relate to discovering druggable vulnerabilities in genetically defined cancers and elucidating the mechanisms of reactive oxygen species in cancer growth using cutting edge chemical proteomic technologies. To learn more about our research visit: barpeledlab.org.  She or he will have the opportunity to become fully involved with all the steps of research being completed in our laboratory, often working directly with Dr. Bar-Peled, which will lead to numerous publications. Investigators in our laboratory will present at regular laboratory meetings. The experience gained in the lab will be very helpful for pursuing a career as a researcher or physician.

 

Skills required: The ideal candidate will be detail-oriented, organized, and able to work independently as well as part of a team in a fast-paced evolving environment. Excellent communication and organizational skills are necessary. Students majoring in biology, molecular biology, chemistry, or biochemistry are encouraged to apply. Candidates with a strong computational backgrounds are also encouraged to apply. Candidates with research experience in a laboratory are highly preferred, but this is not required.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Performs base-level procedures as assigned (i.e. – pipetting, tissue culture, in vitro assays, etc.)
  • Prepares proteomic samples
  • Conducts mammalian tissue culture experiments
  • Conducts molecular biology experiments (cloning, western blotting, gene-editing using CRISPR)
  • Maintains laboratory notebook
  • Understands and applies basic scientific techniques
  • Conducts analysis of results
  • Supports the research of other lab members
  • Preforms independent literature searches
  • Assists with organizing materials for publication or presentation
  • Works in an efficient manner
  • Has a high capacity for problem solving

Number of hours: 14-20 week. 2 Semester minimum requirement.

Mentoring: Dr. Bar-Peled or a highly trained member of his Team.

Student Stipend: Subject to discussion

Application information: Send a cover letter and your CV to Liron at lbar-peled@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

Feb 1, 2021

Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering research opportunity at the Rowland Institute (semester and summer)

Contact information:Dr. Shabnam Raayai (sraayai@fas.harvard.edu), Rowland Institute at Harvard University, https://raayailab.rowland.harvard.edu/ 

Project description and duties:Raayai Lab is focused on the study of fluid and solid mechanics and the interaction of flow with rigid and soft surfaces. Inspired by ordered textures and geometries seen in nature, such as ribs on shark scales, posts on Lotus leaves, or ridges on rice leaves, our group is interested in investigating the effect of textures on the flow around them using experimental and numerical techniques to identify the advantages and disadvantages of employing textures in engineering applications.

We are looking to recruit an undergraduate researcher to help with different parts of the project including fabrication, experimental and/or numerical aspects of the investigation. 

Skills required:Knowledge of basic concepts in mechanics and CAD modeling;Basic knowledge of programming and proficiency with Python or C++. 

Learning outcomes: During this project, the student will:

  • • learn to design and fabricate textured surfaces 
  • • learn how to conduct literature review related to our research work 
  • • analyze results with respect to the parameters of interest

Number of hours:Students are expected to commit 10 hours/week during the semester and full time (35 hours/week) during the summer period. 

Mentoring: Dr. Raayai will supervise the project directly and will be the mentor. There will be regular meetings to discuss the research and progress. The student will be able to attend lab meetings, and will have an opportunity to present their work.

Student stipend: This position pays $15/hour.

Application information:Please send a CV and a cover letter expressing interestto sraayai@fas.harvard.edu.

 

Jan 14, 2021

Undergraduate neuroscience research opportunity at the Rowland Institute (semester and summer)

Contact information: Dr. Sasha Rayshubskiy (srayshubskiy@rowland.harvard.edu), Rowland Institute at Harvard University, www.rayshubskiylab.org

Project description and duties: Our lab is interested in neural architectures that define persistent states in animal behavior. For example, how does the brain configure the motor control system to coordinate movements during the persistent state of cooking and how is it configured differently when we’re in a persistent state of playing basketball? We address these questions in the fruit fly – Drosophila melanogaster – because the electron microscopy level circuit diagram of many neural circuits in the fly’s brain has recently become available to the public. As a result, these anatomically-based circuit diagrams are generating hypothesis about circuit function at an unprecedented rate.

We are looking to recruit an undergraduate researcher to help work with this anatomical data to help us understand the function of these circuits.

To learn more, see the research section of our lab’s website in the link above.

Skills required: Basic knowledge of programming. Knowledge of basic concepts in neuroscience and proficiency with Python or R is desired.

Learning outcomes: At the end of the training, the student will:

  • learn to analyze detailed descriptions of neural anatomical data
  • build neural circuits from anatomical data and devise models of their potential function
  • learn how to interpret results of scientific papers related to our research work

Based on their contributions, students will be co-authors on scientific manuscripts.

Number of hours: Students are expected to commit 10 hours/week during the semester and full time (35 hours/week) during the summer period.

 

Mentoring: Sasha Rayshubskiy will be a direct supervisor and mentor of the student. We will meet at least weekly and as much as needed to discuss work and progress. The student will also work with postdoctoral fellows in the laboratory and will be able to attend lab meetings and journal clubs, where they will have an opportunity to present.

 

Student stipend: This position pays $15/hour.

 

Application information:

Please send a CV and a cover letter expressing interest, goals and anticipated availability to Sasha Rayshubskiy (srayshubskiy@rowland.harvard.edu).

 

 

Jan 5, 2021

Undergraduate Research: MGHfC Digestive Diseases

Contact information:

Bryan P. Hurley, Ph.D.

Director of the MGHfC Digestive Disease Summer Research Program

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School

Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center

Massachusetts General Hospital

https://www.massgeneral.org/children/mucosal-immunology/education-training/digestive-disease-summer-research-program

Project description and duties:

The MGHfC Digestive Disease Summer Research Program offers short-term NIH support as part of an integrated research educational experience that matches 10-12 student participants with research mentors to perform independent research focused on digestive diseases over a 10-week period during the summer. In addition to presenting their research at a summer’s end symposium, students will also participate in a peer-driven presentation-based biomedical course and a panel discussion on biomedical careers. Currently 25 MGH Principal Investigators with interest in digestive diseases serve as mentors spanning a wide range of topics and technical training. Research topics include obesity, food allergy, microbial pathogenesis, gut-brain axis, probiotics, intestinal development and maintenance, cystic fibrosis, celiac disease, inflammation, intestinal parasites, and adaptive immunity. Techniques applied to research projects include, advanced imaging, microfluidics, molecular biology, computational biology, stem cell biology, immune cell isolation, in vivo modeling, and patient-based clinical research. The MGHfC Digestive Disease Summer Research Program provides an excellent opportunity for science, math, and engineering students interested in conducting biomedical research in an academic hospital setting.  

Skills required: Are students expected to have any particular laboratory skills, if so which ones? If no prior research experience is required, state so to encourage applications from new undergraduate researchers.

No previous experience required

Learning outcomes: research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Students will learn research methodology that includes study design and data analysis, as well as concepts in immunology, stem cell biology, and infectious disease, among other topics in biomedical research.  Students will also develop scientific presentation and career networking skills  

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if these are negotiable, state so. Some students may choose to take summer courses, so perhaps flexibility in this area will result in more students applying)

During a 10-week period that runs from early June to mid-August, students are expected to work fulltime (40 hours/week)

Mentoring: who will be mentoring the undergraduate, how often are mentorship zoom meetings,  and can the student attend research group zoom meetings?

Each student participating in the MGHfC Digestive Disease Summer Research program will be matched with one of our 25 faculty mentors based on availability and the student’s research interests.

https://www.massgeneral.org/children/mucosal-immunology/education-training/participating-faculty

Student stipend: Can the research group pay a stipend to the student? State if the position is a paid position or a volunteer position.

For students accepted to participate in the MGHfC Digestive Disease Summer Research Program, a stipend will be provided for the duration of the 10-week program through an NIH educational grant awarded to MGH

Application information:

https://www.massgeneral.org/children/mucosal-immunology/education-training/apply-to-the-mghfc-digestive-disease-summer-research-program

 

 

Dec 18, 2020

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Rashidian, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/HMS

Contact information: Mohammad Rashidian, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Assistant Professor of Radiology, Harvard Medical School

Project description and duties: Development of precision therapeutics to tackle challenges in cancer immunology and autoimmune disease

Immunotherapy has revolutionized cancer treatment, however, a significant fraction of patients fail to respond to therapy and may suffer serious side effects. Our lab studies cancer immunology using expertise in chemical biology, molecular biology, and immunology. We are focused on understanding the underlying mechanisms of how the tumor microenvironment is shaped and continuously changed in response to cancer immunotherapies. We aim to develop new and improved diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic tools to detect, diagnose, characterize, treat, and prevent cancer.

Our research aims are fivefold: (1) to develop methods for non-invasive monitoring of immune responses; (2) to investigate changes in the tumor microenvironment (TME) in response to treatment; (3) to explore how to reshape the TME to a more pronounced anti-tumor status and develop tools to realize this possibility; and (4) to develop precision therapeutics for cancer. In the long term, our goals are to help better understand the dynamics of immune responses, and to investigate what is behind the heterogeneous response to cancer immunotherapy. These are essential for developing more effective therapies, more effective methods for early detection of cancer, and new prognostic modalities.

Skills required: students with basic biology lab skillsets are encouraged to apply, however, no prior research experience is required. Students will have the opportunity to work with senior scientists in the lab to be trained for lab techniques.

Learning outcomes: research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing, as well as lab skillsets such as cell culture, protein engineering, protein expression and purification, ELISA analysis, running SDS-PAGE and western blot analyses, protein labeling, and working with instruments such as FPLC, microscopy and flow cytometry.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: 10 h per week for spring semseter, and at least 30 h per week for the summer.

Mentoring: senior graduate students and postdocs in the lab will be mentoring students. The PI will have regular weekly meetings with students as well.

Student stipend: positions are volunteer positions, however the PI will work with students to apply for Harvard fellowship programs (HCRP, PRISE, etc.).

Application information: motivated students should contact Dr. Rashidian at mohammad_rashidian@dfci.harvard.edu

 

 

Dec 17, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational and Systems Biology at Zomorrodi Lab (MGH/HMS)

 

Contact information:

Ali R. Zomorrodi 

Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center

Massachusetts General Hospital for Children

44 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114

E-mail: azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu

Zomorrodi lab website

 

Project description and duties: 

Zomorrodi lab integrates biological networks, mathematical/statistical/physical models and engineering tools to develop computational mechanistic models of the microbiome and the host. These models are used to advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and to streamline the design of personalized treatments.

 

We are recruiting an undergraduate researcher to work on a project concerned with the construction of computational models of host-microbiota interactions in colorectal cancer by using genome-scale metabolic networks. This project can be entirely performed remotely. 

 

Skills required:

Having a keen interest in computational research is the only requirement and 

no mathematical or programming skills are needed. For students who are particularly interested in computational modeling or computer programming there are ample opportunities to tailor the project toward their interests. 

 

Learning outcomes

Students will learn how computational simulations and biological network models can be used to address translational problems. More broadly, students gain experience in essential research skills including data analysis, interpretation of results, presentations, and scientific writing.

 

Time commitment:

Negotiable. The PI is flexible to accommodate students’ schedules or other time demands although students who plan to stay in the lab for longer time periods (six months or so) are preferred. This project is intended for the duration of the Spring semester and summer and can be extended into Fall and beyond upon mutual interest. 

 

Mentoring: 

Students will be directly mentored by Dr. Zomorrodi and have the opportunity to remotely interact with other lab members and attend group meetings. Mentorship zoom meetings are held once a week on a regular basis.  

 

Student stipend: 

This is a volunteer research position. Students are encouraged to apply for undergraduate research fellowships such as HCRP or to register for a research course credit. 

 

Application information

Interested candidates should email a CV to Dr. Zomorrodi at azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu and briefly explain what their interests are. Please use “2021 Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunities” as the subject of your email.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Position, Dr. Weng Lab, University of Massachusetts Medical School

Zhiping Weng, Ph.D.

Li Weibo Chair in Biomedical Research

Director, Program in Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology 

Professor, Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology

University of Massachusetts Medical School

About the Project

Since the introduction of genome-wide association studies in the mid-2000s, great strides have been made in the understanding of the genetics of human disease. However, while the monogenic origins of Mendelian diseases can often be pinpointed, the multigenic factors contributing to complex diseases remain elusive. Recent findings suggest that the majority of complex disease heritability is explained by rare variants and the summative effect of many low-effect-size common variants; thus, collections of related but distinct variants likely have joint effects on molecular phenotypes such as gene expression or biochemical pathway activity, which in turn directly contribute to diseases. 

In this project, we aim to develop a computational framework that can integrate the wealth of publicly available whole-genome sequencing and epigenetic data to predict causal variants, genes, network modules, and pathways in complex diseases. We will apply our framework on non-syndromic cases of three prevalent human congenital defects with a significant social and economic cost: cleft lip/palate, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and ventricular septal defect. These defects all have phenotypic data available through a wealth of datasets but their genetic basis is poorly understood, offering a great opportunity for the discovery of novel biology with therapeutic potential.

About the Weng Lab and the Program in Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology at UMass Medical School

The Weng lab develops and applies computational techniques to study biological processes at the molecular level. Our research emphasizes statistical and machine learning techniques; we apply these techniques to various types of genomics, epigenomics, and transcriptomics data, at the tissue and single-cell levels, in normal and disease samples. More information at https://umassmed.edu/zlab.

The Program in Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology at UMass Medical School was founded in 2008 with Dr. Weng as its founding director. Research in the program addresses cutting-edge questions in biology and medicine by developing and applying computational genomics approaches that take advantage of genomic information now available for humans and model organisms. More information can be found at https://umassmed.edu/bioinformatics.

UMass Medical School is a culturally diverse community, and we strongly encourage applications from women and minority candidates. UMass Medical School is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

Note: this is non-Harvard research lab and you will not be able to secure most Harvard Research Fellowships, or apply this towards honors thesis.

 

Nov 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Drs. Sepucha and Valentine, Health Decision Sciences Center, MGH

Contact information: KD Valentine, Department of General Internal Medicine, kvalentine2@mgh.hrvard.edu, lab website: https://mghdecisionsciences.org/

Project description and duties: Please see attached proposal

Skills required: Prior research experience is required

Learning outcomes: Research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, patient engagement

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: We can work with the student and their schedule to decide on the number of hours per week.

Mentoring: Karen Sepucha, PhD and KD Valentine, PhD will be overseeing the student intern, attendance in Zoom team meetings will be encouraged.

Student stipend: This is a non-paid internship

Application information: A cover letter and resume are required, please contact Dr. KD Valentine, at kvalentine2@mgh.hrvard.edu with questions and materials.

The Center has several ongoing studies:

  • Promoting Informed Decisions about Cancer Screening in Older Adults (PRIMED Study). This multi-site randomized trial is examining the impact of a skills training course for primary care physicians on conversations with older adults considering whether to continue or stop colorectal cancer screening.
  • PRIMED-COVID Study. This extension of the PRIMED study explores the reactions of patients who have had their colonoscopies rescheduled or delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic and is evaluating an intervention to help patients navigate their options for colon cancer screening during the pandemic.
  • Implementation of patient decision aids for elective orthopedic surgery decisions. This implementation science project is a collaboration across Orthopedic Departments at hospitals affiliated with MassGeneralBrigham as well as others across the US. We aim to improve the quality of elective surgery decisions by implementing patient decision aids into routine orthopedic care for four conditions: hip and knee osteoarthritis, lumbar herniated disc and spinal stenosis.
  • Impact of cognitive function on shared decision making. This project is a collaboration with the Weiner Center for Preoperative Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. We are surveying older adults (65+) who have scheduled surgery to assess their knowledge about the procedure, amount of shared decision making, and level of cognitive function. The data will be used to refine a clinical survey instrument that measures shared decision making.
  • Aortic valve replacement decisions. This project is a collaboration with the cardiology department and aims to identify if a decision aid for patients with AS can improve patient’s decision quality.

Student activities may include:

  • Literature review
  • Key informant interviews and/or focus groups with patients, caregivers, and clinicians
  • Observation of clinic visits and mapping of clinic workflow (maybe be virtual)
  • Development and testing of decision support tools (paper-based, online, video)
  • Survey research: designing questionnaires, screening patients, preparing mailings, reminder phone calls, data entry, medical chart review
  • Data analysis: qualitative analyses of interviews and focus groups, basic and advanced quantitative data analytics, and data visualization
  • Use of Microsoft Office Suite, Redcap, Access, R, SPSS
  • Manuscript contributions (writing, editing, proofing, references)
  • Local conference poster presentations
  • Grant proposal contributions

Interested?  Send the following to KD Valentine via email (kvalentine2@mgh.harvard.edu)

  • 1 page (maximum) statement describing your research interests and goals and how this experience might help with your development
  • Your CV or Resume

To learn more about The Health Decision Sciences Center, visit our website:

https://mghdecisionsciences.org/

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cognitive Neuroscience Group (CNG), MGH Institute of Health Professions

Contact information: Lauryn Zipse, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, lzipse@mghihp.edu, 617-643-3245

Project description and duties: The research intern will assist with development of an app-based assessment of cognitive and language function to track recovery after stroke.

Skills required: Programming experience required, preferably but not necessarily using Xcode.

Learning outcomes: The research intern will work with an interdisciplinary team based at MGH to learn about stroke recovery, evaluation of language and cognition, and tele-assessment.

Number of hours expected: The number of hours per week and duration of involvement are negotiable.

Mentoring: Dr. Lauryn Zipse will be the primary mentor. The research intern will have the opportunity to participate in team meetings, via Zoom, with an interdisciplinary team of medical professionals and researchers.

Student stipend: This is currently a volunteer position.

Application information: Email your resume and a cover letter/email to Dr. Lauryn Zipse at lzipse@mghihp.edu

 

Sep 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Sang Park, BCH

Contact information:   PI name: Sang Park, Department: Pediatrics, Location: 3 Blackfan Circle, Boston, MA 02115 

Contact information: sangwon.park@childrens.harvard.edu    Lab website: parklab.info

Project description and duties:

Skills required: Power point, Excel, and Adobe Illustrator.

Learning outcomes: Students will learn how to analyze western blot and qPCR data, how to present their data, and how to write a scientific journal/grant.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if these are negotiable, state so. Some students may choose to take summer courses, so perhaps flexibility in this area will result in more students applying): A minimum of one-year commitment would be good, but it is negotiable. 

Mentoring: PI and other lab members will be mentoring. PI will be providing mentorship through zoom meetings on a weekly- or bi-weekly basis. Other lab members will be providing mentorship as needed (most likely, more frequently than once a week). Students can attend research group zoom meetings. 

Student stipend: The position will be paid $15/hour. 

Application information: Detail the information students need to submit and the contact information for submitting this information: Email your resume to Dr. Park at sangwon.park@childrens.harvard.edu​ 

 

 

Sep 16, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Thoracic Surgery Research at Dr. Yang’s lab, MGH/HMS

Contact information: Dr. Chi-Fu Jeffrey Yang, Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital.  cjyang@mgh.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: Our program is an opportunity to work with physicians and medical students on cutting-edge clinical surgical research.  In addition, we will teach students how to raise awareness about lung cancer screening in the community.  Our program is meant to be more than an assistantship: this is a unique opportunity to work directly alongside talented physicians and researchers in the field.  We want to develop your research and leadership skills and allow you the opportunity to create and lead innovation that may potentially improve the lives of patients.

Responsibilities include:

• Learning how to perform clinical research in thoracic oncology with physicians and medical students 

• Collaborating with team members to raise awareness about lung cancer screening

• Programs development

 Skills required:

• Proficiency with Microsoft Word, Excel, and Outlook. Familiarity with statistical programs such as R or STATA are a plus but not required.  Video-editing and familiarity with web design are a plus, but not required

• Commitment to research and public service

• Previous leadership experience and demonstrated individual initiative are key criteria that will be considered when reviewing applicants for this position

Learning outcomes: By the end of their training, the trainee should be able to:

1.         Learn how to perform cutting-edge clinical research in thoracic surgery

2.         Read papers in any major medical journal and understand the strengths and weaknesses of the study

3.         Be fluent in medical vocabulary and understand the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer

4.         Learn how to effectively engage with the public to raise awareness about lung cancer

5.         If warranted based on their contributions, students will be co-authors on scientific manuscripts.

 

Number of hours: The project will require at least 8-10 hours/week of commitment.  At the same time, we recognize that students have many commitments, including studying for finals and spending time with family and friends, and we will work around the student’s schedule to make this a fun and engaging learning experience.

 

Mentoring: Dr. Yang is a thoracic surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital.  He graduated from Harvard College and Harvard Medical School.  He lived in Matthews as a first-year and then Leverett House.  He has over 7 years of experience teaching and mentoring undergraduate students, many of whom are now in medical school.  He has built a team that cares deeply about the undergraduate research experience and really wants to help students achieve their dreams. 

These are his publications: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/chi-fu.yang.1/bibliography/public/

Student stipend: Volunteer position. The Laboratory does not have funds to pay student stipends, but students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships (https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities)

 

Application information: Please e-mail your resume/CV along with a cover letter including a brief outline of your interests, goals, and anticipated time availability

to Dr. Chi-Fu Jeffrey Yang at cjyang@mgh.harvard.edu

 

Sep 3, 2020

Research Assistant, Demehri Laboratory, Center for Cancer Immunology, Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School

Full time research assistant position is available immediately in our laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School to study the mechanisms of immune regulation of early cancer development and the role alarmins and commensal viruses in this process. The position is ideal for a recent graduate planning to work for couple of years in research before entering graduate or medical school. Besides bench research, applicant will have the opportunity to learn about clinical care for patients with severe skin cancers and skin-related adverse effects of cancer immunotherapies. Attention to detail, high motivation, and effective communication skills are essential. Knowledge in immunological, molecular, and mice experimentations are considered important for this position.

Visit our laboratory website for more detail:

http://massgeneral.link/DemeheriLab

Please email a cover letter and CV to Dr. Shawn Demehri:

sdemehri1@mgh.harvard.edu
 

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Radiation Physics and Instrumentation Lab, MGH

Contact information:   PI: Hamid Sabet, Ass. Prof. HSabet@mgh.harvard.edu

Additional contact: Lisa Bläckberg, Instructor. LBlackberg@mgh.harvard.edu

Radiation Physics and Instrumentation Laboratory, Gordon Center for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, MGH.

Lab website: https://scholar.harvard.edu/sabet

 

Project description and duties:

In our imaging instrumentation lab, we focus on developing high-performance and advanced radiation based medical imaging systems. This is done by rigorously studying and addressing some of the fundamental limitations and obstacles of today’s imaging systems.

We have several ongoing projects including the development of a high performance Cardiac dedicated Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) system, development of a Brain dedicated Position Emission Tomography System as well as an intraoperative probe-based imaging system.

In all these areas we are combining innovation on the system level design with developments of individual radiation detectors to meet the requirements of a given application.

In addition to the mentioned projects we are continuously exploring new ideas in order to address current shortcomings and limitations in the field.

While a large portion of our work is experimental in nature, there are also several areas of our research that can be done remotely. We perform a number of different types of simulation studies for system and detector optimization, as well as GPU programming and machine learning. Additional work currently done remotely are image reconstruction and supporting tasks such as mechanical drawings.

The specific tasks of a remote undergraduate student would largely depend on the interest and skills of the student and could involve for example programming tasks, data analysis, mechanical drawings, simulations, experimental design and documentation.

Skills required:

Other than logical thinking and enthusiasm, no other skill is required! Computer programming in MATLAB, LabVIEW, Python, etc is a plus. Students will learn all the necessary skills while participating in the work in our lab.

 

Learning outcomes:

A student in our lab would have the opportunity to learn about the medical imaging field and contribute to our research while expanding their skill set. The student would get a general knowledge of different medical imaging systems and their requirements as well as basic understanding on how radiation detection works.

Specific skills would depend on the tasks taken on by the student but could include data analysis methods, basic programming, visual presentation of scientific data and scientific writing.

 

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project:

The number of hours per week is flexible (up to 15-20 hours weekly). Project length is also flexible as project type and length can be tuned based on the student.

 

Mentoring:

The student will be mentored by current lab members. Zoom meetings will be done as often as needed, but minimally once per week. The student can also attend the weekly lab meeting held over zoom.

 

Student stipend:

This is a volunteer position

 

Application information:

If interested please send a CV to either Hamid Sabet (HSabet@mgh@harvard.edu) or Lisa Bläckberg (LBlackberg@mgh.harvard.edu)

 

Aug 31, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Computational Parasite Genomics, Neafsey Lab, Broad Institute/HSPH

Contact information: Dr. Angela Early (early@broadinstitute.org), Neafsey Lab, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, HSPH, https://sites.sph.harvard.edu/neafsey-lab/

Project description and duties: Our lab uses computational methods to study the genomes of Plasmodium parasites, the causative agents of malaria. We are particularly interested in understanding how Plasmodium genomes are evolving to increase survival in the face of drugs and host immune responses. Our ability to make these discoveries, however, relies on differentiating true biological signal from various sources of error (or “noise”). We are looking for an undergraduate to assess how model parameter choice affects the analysis outcome of several population genetic tools. You will be trained in using the tools and then run them independently on multiple data sets using different parameter sets. You will then learn the appropriate statistical tests for ascertaining whether the different input parameters significantly change the final analysis results. With this study, we aim to establish “best practices” for both our group and the larger malaria research community.

Skills required: Some programming experience and a basic knowledge of genetics (eg, AP Biology or Life Sciences 1B). This project will involve command line scripting, python, and R. Direct experience with all these languages is not necessary, but you should feel comfortable independently reading and editing code (with the help of Google, of course!)

Learning outcomes: In the first semester, you will learn to run relevant population genetics software and discuss the basics of experimental design. If continuing for a second semester, you will make and test a hypothesis, independently analyze data, and present your findings in a short oral presentation.

Number of hours: Minimum of 5 hours per week.

Mentoring: Depending on the number of hours worked, the student will meet once or twice a week with Dr. Angela Early. If desired, students can also attend weekly group meetings to learn about other research projects in the Neafsey Lab.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position, but we will support applications for HCRP stipends.

Application information: If you are interested in speaking further about the project, please email your resume to Angela Early (early@broadinstitute.org).

 

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Evolution of Drug Resistance, Neafsey Lab, Broad Institute/HSPH

Contact information: Dr. Angela Early (early@broadinstitute.org), Neafsey Lab, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, HSPH, https://sites.sph.harvard.edu/neafsey-lab/

Project description and duties: Research in the Neafsey Group aims to understand the evolutionary processes through which Plasmodium parasites—the causative agents of malaria—acquire drug resistance. In this project, we are interested in expanding the usual focus. Instead of considering only malaria drugs, we will additionally investigate whether drugs intended to treat bacterial or other parasitic infections also impose selection on Plasmodium. In other words, are Plasmodium parasites developing resistance not only to anti-malarial treatments but also to commonly used antibiotics? If so, could this hamper the development of future novel malaria treatments? This project is brand new, and so we are looking for an engaged undergraduate to help with the initial literature review. This literature review will gather information on (1) the main drugs used (both officially and unofficially) in a subset of key malaria-endemic countries and (2) the cellular targets of these drugs. If continuing on with the project, the student will then use computational and statistical approaches to investigate whether the Plasmodium version of these drug targets appear to be adapting to patterns of regional drug use.

Skills required: No prior experience is required

Learning outcomes: In the first semester, you will learn to conduct a thorough scientific literature review that will culminate in giving a brief oral presentation. If continuing for a second semester, you will learn to perform data analysis and statistical testing to look for correlations between drug usage and genetic markers.

Number of hours: Minimum of 5 hours per week.

Mentoring: Depending on the number of hours worked, the student will meet once or twice a week with Dr. Angela Early and will have the opportunity to attend weekly group meetings.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position, but we will support applications for HCRP stipends.

Application information: If you are interested in speaking further about the project, please email your resume to Angela Early (early@broadinstitute.org) to set up a time for a Zoom call.

 

 

Aug 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Cancer Genomics at Dr. Kwiatkowski lab, BWH/HMS

Contact information: Dr. David Kwiatkowski and Dr. Krinio Giannikou, Cancer Genetics Laboratory, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School,  20 Shattuck street, Thorn Research Building, Room 826, http://www.kwiatkowskilab.org/, e-mail: dk@rics.bwh.harvard.edu and kgiannikou@bwh.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: Professor David Kwiatkowski, has an established and acclaimed academic career in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) disease research field. His research group identified the TSC1 gene in 1997 and has pursued numerous studies exploring human molecular genetics of TSC, biological and signaling pathways and therapeutic approaches for TSC tumors. They have generated multiple mouse models of TSC as well as cell line models that are used broadly. His lab has a specific interest in mosaicism in TSC, and the pathogenesis of all of the tumors that occur in this disease. Dr Kwiatkowski is a leader of several clinical trials for TSC, LAM disease and Perivascular Epithelioid malignant tumor (PEComas) with metastatic potential.

Some publications relevant to the research topics covered in the lab:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31506280/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31160751/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27494029/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30593515/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31000673/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32060062/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22456611/

The trainee will get exposure to translational research in the field of TSC and malignant PEComas with the ultimate goal to understand the genetics and transcriptomics of these rare diseases:

  1. Learn how to analyze whole exome sequencing data from tumor samples
  2. Annotate mutations using the Standard Mutation Nomenclature and assess functional significance of genetic variants using in silico prediction tools.
  3. Visualize exome data with graphs and plots-Correlate molecular findings with the clinical data using Graphpad Prism
  4. Perform differential gene expression analysis on whole transcriptome RNA-seq data using Qlucore, Cistrome toolkit and others.
  5. Perform pathway and network analyses on RNA-seq output data using GSEA, DAVID, and other available tools.

Trainees should participate in at least one relevant course or seminar per week in support of their training goals. Courses and seminars are widely available throughout BWH, Harvard Medical School and Catalyst. Offerings and schedules may be found online at:

BWH Research Intranet: http://bwhbri.partners.org

BWH Events Calendar: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/view/viewEvents.aspx?audience=1

Catalyst: http://catalyst.harvard.edu/learning.html
Harvard Medical School: http://itwwebs.med.harvard.edu/EventsCal/ASP-HTML/index.asp

 

Skills required: Previous knowledge in statistical analysis, R code and other computational language is desirable.

Learning outcomes: By the end of their training, the trainee should be able to:

  1. Critically analyze results and understand scientific papers related to our research work
  2. Interpret and present scientific data in an efficient way
  3. Learn to effectively work with other colleagues in a team-based approach.

The trainee will present their findings and analysis at least one laboratory meeting at the end of their training period. If warranted based on their contributions, students will be co-authors on scientific manuscripts.

Number of hours: The project will require at least 4-6 hours/week of commitment, but since it is a remote research training, the number of hours can be much more than that, dependent on the initiative of the student.  This is not a make work project. However, the student can organize their time according to their school schedule.

Mentoring:  Dr. Krinio Giannikou from the Kwiatkowski lab will be the direct supervisor and mentor of the student. Dr. Giannikou will teach, guide and advise the student. She will e-meet with them weekly or as much as needed to discuss the work in progress. Also, she will keep regular contact with them through e-mails.  The student will also have meetings with Dr. Kiatkowski, and attend weekly lab meetings and journal clubs and will have opportunities to present at the lab meetings and journal clubs. The trainee will be encouraged to discuss their findings with other members from Kwiatkowski lab during remote weekly lab meetings.

Student stipend: Volunteer position. The Laboratory does not have funds to pay student stipends, but students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships (https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities)

Application information: Please e-mail your resume/CV along with a cover letter including a brief outline of your interests, goals, and anticipated time availability

to Dr. Kwiatkowski dk@rics.bwh.harvard.edu  and Dr. Giannikou kgiannikou@bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Tropical Forest Ecology, Dr. Moorcroft Lab, OEB

Contact information: Dr. Paul Moorcroft, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, paul_moorcroft@harvard.edu, Museum of Natural History, Suite 43 (currently working remotely), http://moorcroftlab.oeb.harvard.edu/home

Project description and duties:

Large trees are disproportionately important players in global ecosystems, accounting for the majority of carbon storage in a forest stand. Recently, the tallest trees in the tropics were found to occur in Malaysian Borneo. Understanding how these trees function is critical for understanding how they will respond to future global change. The student will contribute to an ongoing research project evaluating characteristics of emergent (large canopy) trees and tree species in Southeast Asian tropical rainforests. Responsibilities will include data cleaning and organizing in R, analyzing tree census data from several tropical forest sites in Malaysian Borneo to calculate diversity, and growth and mortality rates, and conducting statistical analyses. In addition to data analysis, the student will also learn how to create publication-quality figures. Opportunities also exist for working with LiDAR and imaging spectroscopy airborne remote sensing data if the student is interested. These activities will be closely guided and supported by Dr. Elsa Ordway via regular meetings.

Skills required:

- Experience with R is highly desirable.

- Prior use of ArcGIS preferred but not necessary.

Learning outcomes: scientific research skills including: study design, data analysis, science presentations, and scientific writing.

- Data analysis skills: statistical analyses of plant demography and diversity, analysis of airborne remote sensing data

- Data visualization skills

- Co-authorship on a scientific peer-reviewed paper

Number of hours students are expected to work and duration of the project:

- 10-15 hours/week

- length of project – 1 semester with possible opportunities to become involved in additional projects after the completion of this project

Mentoring:

The student will be mentioned by Dr. Elsa Ordway (Postdoctoral Researcher) in the group and will meet with the mentor via Zoom meetings 1-3 times per week as needed. Periodic (approximately bi-weekly) meetings with Dr. Ordway and Prof. Moorcroft. The student is also welcome to attend weekly lab group meetings / talks and frequently meet with PI to present project updates.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position, but students are encouraged to apply for internal Harvard and outside fellowships.

Application information: Email your resume and a short paragraph describing why you’re interested in this research opportunity to Dr. Elsa Ordway at elsa_ordway@fas.harvard.edu.

 

Aug 26, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational and Systems Biology at Zomorrodi Lab, HMS

Contact information:

Ali R. Zomorrodi

Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center

Massachusetts General Hospital for Children

44 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114

E-mail: azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu

Zomorrodi lab website

Project description and duties:

Zomorrodi lab integrates biological networks, mathematical/statistical/physical models and engineering tools to develop computational mechanistic models of the microbiome and the host. These models are used to advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and to streamline the design of personalized treatments.

Multiple projects that can be entirely performed remotely are available in the following areas:

  1. Reconstruction of metabolic and genetic network models for human cell lines
  2. Computational assessment of the effect of metabolites produced by the gut microbiota on the host metabolic and immune systems by using cell-specific metabolic networks.
  3. Analysis of microbiomic data using statistical methods and machine learning.
  4. Exploring the effect of spatial structure on the equilibrium state of microbial communities by integrating game theory, metabolic networks and physical models.

Skills required:

Having a keen interest in computational research is the only requirement and

no mathematical or programming skills are needed for most projects. For students who are particularly interested in computational modeling or computer programming there are ample opportunities to tailor the projects toward their interests.

Learning outcomes:

Students will learn how computational simulations and biological network models can be used to address translational problems. More broadly, students gain experience in essential research skills including data analysis, interpretation of results, presentations, and scientific writing.

Time commitment:

Negotiable. The PI is flexible to accommodate students’ schedules or other time demands. These projects are intended for the duration of the Fall and can be extended into Spring and beyond upon mutual interest.

Mentoring:

Students will be directly mentored by Dr. Zomorrodi and have the opportunity to remotely interact with other lab members and attend group meetings. Mentorship zoom meetings are held once a week on a regular basis. 

Student stipend:

This is a volunteer research position. Students are encouraged to apply for undergraduate research fellowships such as HCRP or to register for a research course credit.

Application information:

Interested candidates should email a CV to Dr. Zomorrodi at azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu and briefly explain what their interests are. Please use “Fall 2020 Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunities” as the subject of your email.

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Industrial Robot, Biorobotics Lab, Harvard SEAS

Contact information: PI: Rob Howe. Contact: Zeo Liu zixiliu@g.harvard.edu http://biorobotics.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

Dancing with an Industrial Robot

Dr. Merritt Moore is a ballerina and scientist who seeks to bring science & technology and arts together. (https://physicsonpointe.com/) One of her current projects is dancing with an industrial robot (UR-10 from Universal Robots). Here we list a few potential technology focused student projects that contribute in bringing new ways to explore this concept of “dancing with an industrial robot” that are also appropriate for remote work given limited access to hardware due to COVID-19 pandemic. Please note that student ideas are also welcome. The student will be working with Dr. Moore on the performance side and the Biorobotics Lab on the robotics side of the project.

  1. Real-time motion tracking through a high frame rate camera: This project involves developing a task specific (tracking the motion of the dancer) algorithm that operates in real time (minimal latency) to provide information for guiding robot motion. The student will be working with dance footages with the possibility of acquiring a high frame rate camera for demo. The student can evaluate the performance of the overall result with the exact robot through simulation.

Recommended background:

Any of the following: computer vision, image processing, machine learning, software engineering, robotics (for simulation)

  1. Real-time motion tracking through a relatively low cost commercial motion capture systems: In this project, the student is to evaluate existing commercial motion capture systems, identify one that’s within budget and develop a real-time pipeline that provides tracking of the dancer with minimal latency for guiding robot motion. This project has multiple layers as the student works to integrate the system of the motion capture system, explore novel techniques to decrease latency and interpolate with intelligence to push for further performance. The student can evaluate the performance of the overall result with the exact robot through simulation.

Recommended background:

Any of the following: robotics (frames and poses), signal processing, machine learning

  1. Develop novel controls for elaborate end effector (such as ribbons, water fountain, lights, robot hands, walls, screens (for projection)): In this project we explore different ways to add to the performance via interesting attachment to the end effector of the robot. Listed in the title are a few options but we’re open to new ideas in any creative way. Students can pick one to focus or evaluate a few options as appropriate. There are many aspects of this project depending on the choice of the end effector attachment. For instance, modeling the trajectory of the ribbon is a complex task because it is made of soft material, and its motion is affected by not only the end effector’s motion but also environmental factors such as air flow. The student can also choose to combine a few elements to push the limit of visual effect. For instance, one of the famous science museum exhibitions uses lighting and water drops where by changing the frequency of the light, the water drop could appear going upwards. The student can choose to focus on theoretical development, modeling, experimental exploration, or system integration. This work is projected to take place in simulation but hardware setup for validation that’s appropriate for remote work can also be considered.

Recommended background:

Any of the following: signals and systems, robotics, fluid dynamics, acoustics, modeling of soft material, finite element analysis, optimization

  1. Creative and interactive camera view: In this project we have the robot hold a camera while interacting with the dancer. The camera view is projected to a screen at the performance. The specification of this project is open-ended. Here we ask the question: how should the robot move with respect to the dancer to show interesting angles? Where should the robot go to respond to the dancer? By combining choreography and spontaneous motion through visual feedback, can we introduce new elements to this performance? This project is projected to take place in simulation but a combination of simulation and a physical camera (or even a miniature robot) is a possibility, budget allowing.

There are a few interesting potential aspects to this project in addition to the artistic side including but limited to the control of the robot through kinematics, understanding what the camera sees through real-time computer vision, exploring artistic way of setting a scene through machine learning, and in case of using a camera, integrating with the camera so that one can get the video stream and change the settings dynamically (zooming focusing etc)

Any of the following: robotics, computer vision, image processing, machine learning

Learning outcomes: research experience in robotics/computer vision/machine learning/software engineering

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: negotiable

Mentoring: Mentoring will be provided by PI and a graduate student in the bio robotics lab. Mentorship meetings are flexible but at least once every two weeks. The student is welcome to attend group meetings.

Student stipend: The student is encouraged to apply for undergraduate research funding: https://uraf.harvard.edu/research-funding

Application information: Please email your resume to zixiliu@g.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Biorobotics Lab, Harvard SEAS

Contact information: PI: Rob Howe. Contact: Zeo Liu zixiliu@g.harvard.edu http://biorobotics.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

Computer Vision for An Autonomous Poop-Picking Robot for a Service Dog Facility

Facilities such as the service dog project at Ipswich, Massachusetts are always in need for volunteers to help pick up poop from the puppies and adult dogs that are raised and trained to help people with mobility issues. Poop-picking is an important job however unexciting it may seem. The long term goal of is to build an autonomous robot/drone that tackles this task so that the human volunteers at this facility can focus on the interactions with the dogs. At this facility, there are webcams that streams live 24/7 (such as https://explore.org/livecams/service-dog-project/great-danes-service-puppies-puppy-hill).

The particular aim of this project is to develop computer vision algorithms to automatically detect the action of a dog pooping by running real-time image analysis of the webcams, estimate the location of the poop so that a robot can be sent out for retrieval. Another aspect of this project is processing the image from a camera that is attached to the robot to locate the poop on board of a robot in real time. Note that the major difference is that now the camera is moving and we may be working with visual occlusion when parts of the robot could be blocking the view.

This project has many exciting engineering layers that include but is not limited to image processing, machine learning (likely a convolutional neural network to detect pooping posture), real-time processing, embedded image processing, system integration (pull images from the webcam), and user interface. The student may choose to focus on whichever aspect they find exciting.

Necessary Background:

Any of the below:

- Machine learning experience

- Image processing experience

- Embedded systems

Learning outcomes: research experience in computer vision/machine learning/software engineering

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: negotiable

Mentoring: Mentoring will be provided by PI and a graduate student in the bio robotics lab. Mentorship meetings are flexible but at least once every two weeks. The student is welcome to attend group meetings.

Student stipend: The student is encouraged to apply for undergraduate research funding: https://uraf.harvard.edu/research-funding

Application information: Please email your resume to zixiliu@g.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Synho Do, Ph.D., Laboratory of Medical Imaging and Computation, Department of Radiology, MGH

Contact information:

Synho Do, MS, Ph.D. (sdo@mgh.harvard.edu)

Director, Laboratory of Medical Imaging and Computation

Assistant Medical Director, Advanced Health Technology Engineering, Research, and Development, MGPO, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School

Project description and duties:

We are seeking undergraduate students for projects related to the development of Artificial Intelligence for medical imaging. There are three projects offered, all of them are related to AI (Artificial Intelligence) analysis tools developed for medical images.

A.     Capsule endoscopy

Capsule endoscopy (CE) is a non-invasive, specialized tool used to explore the digestive tract. It shoots an 8 to 12 hour-long video as it passes through the small bowel and produces more than 100,000 images per case. It provides plenty of information that cannot be obtained by other medical tools, but it takes more than an hour to review the video by expert physicians and may miss important information in the process.

We are developing a Computer-Aided Diagnosis tool for capsule endoscopy using machine learning. For this, we have a few sub-projects regarding identifying digestive organs, distinguishing normal structures from abnormal lesions, and estimating quality of bowel preparation, etc. Students will be involved in developing frame processing, feature extraction, and/or classification algorithms.

B.     CXR (Chest X-ray Radiography)

Despite the wide variety of findings that can be seen in a chest radiograph, most algorithms for automated classification of chest radiographs are limited in their number of findings. To solve this effectively, we developed the convolutional neural network (CNN) models by all visual findings extracted from our natural language processing (NLP) algorithm, MGH CXR data, and reports. The further works are related to improving performance and explainability of our AI model as follows:

  • Developing an automatic image-based iterative method for isolating noisy labels on Chest X-ray
  • Developing new visualization methods for highly explainable AI models
  • Developing new keywords generation methods for explainable AI models

C.     NLP (Natural Language Processing)

NLP is a part of artificial intelligence, and the goal is making an interface for computers to interpret and understand human language. NLP technology is already in our lives through Apple Siri, Amazon Alexa, or Google translator, and it will also be important for processing medical records. By using NLP, we can make apps for diagnostic aids, or more easily collect large volumes of data for other AI learning.

One of our current NLP projects is to make a program that automatically extracts disease or its characteristics from chest X-ray reports composed of huge amounts of sentences. The final goal is to identify the statistical characteristics of chest X-ray reports and create a database for developing other AI Students will be involved to make basic data for NLP training, train AI network, and improve the performance of NLP programs.

Skills required:

  • Knowledge of deep learning neural networks
  • Experience in frameworks such as PyTorch (preferred), TensorFlow, Keras etc.
  • Proficiency in programming in Python 

Learning outcomes:

Students can develop skills while working with cutting edge machine learning technologies.

Students develop academic communication skills in preparation for graduate study and academic career.

The goal of this project is to submit an academic paper to a peer-reviewed journal or conference.

Expectations: The student would be expected to spend 10-15 hrs./week on this project for more than one semester.  There is, however, flexibility in the schedule that can be discussed between the applicant and the PI.

Mentoring: Students will be co-mentored by PI Dr. Do and his Post Doctoral research fellows in the group and meet the mentor 1-2 times per week via Microsoft team meetings. Students will be invited to the group’s Microsoft Teams channel where they can connect with other members of the group. Students can also attend weekly lab meetings (on Mondays) and frequently meet with Dr. Do to present project updates.

Student stipend: This position is non-paid. However, our previous interns have received a fellowship for their research with our support and help. 

Application informationPlease send your resume and a brief description of your interest in via email to prof. Synho Do, Ph.D. (sdo@mgh.harvard.edu) and Joowon Chung, MD, Ph.D. (jwchung@mgh.harvard.edu).

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Krichevsky Lab, BWH

Contact information: Dr. Anna Krichevsky, Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases, Neurology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School

Email address: akrichevsky@bwh.harvard.edu

Lab website: https://krichevskylab.bwh.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: Our laboratory focuses on regulatory RNA molecules, such as microRNAs and lncRNAs, their role in brain tumors and neurodegenerative diseases, and potential as novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers. We are also interested in the RNA-mediated intracellular communication between brain tumors and normal cells of their microenvironment. Our overall goal is to develop basic RNA research toward a cure for glioblastoma (GBM), other brain tumors, and neurodegeneration. We recently performed a large screen and collected a dataset of small molecule compounds modulating the expression of various microRNAs in human iPSC-derived neurons. We are seeking a student who will help with exploring and analyzing the dataset, as well as generating novel hypotheses to be tested in cellular and animal models of neurologic diseases.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required, though a general interest in molecular biology and neuroscience is preferred. Background in computational data analysis and/or statistics would be beneficial. Applications from new undergraduate researchers are encouraged.

Learning outcomes: Prospective student is expected to acquire fundamental research skills including reading and understanding the scientific literature, analyzing data, designing new experiments, and scientific writing and presentation.

Number of hours students are expected to work: At least 8 hours per week, but can be flexible.

Mentoring: Student will be mentored remotely through zoom by a postdoctoral fellow and PI on a weekly basis. The student is also welcomed to attend research group zoom meetings.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position. Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships. Assistance may be provided for fellowship applications.

Application information: Interested students should send short email including a statement of academic background and research interest (less than 400 words), resume or CV, and transcript to Dr. Krichevsky.

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, Department of Statistics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

Contact information: Marie-Abele Bind, Department of Statistics, Science Center, Room 608, https://scholar.harvard.edu/marie-abele

Project description and duties: Development or applications of causal inference methods and software for quantifying the effects of randomized or non-randomized exposures (e.g., air pollution, temperature) on outcomes (e.g., fatal accident, crime, mortality).

Skills required: No prior research experience required. New undergraduate researchers and candidates with basic understanding of probability and statistics, and with some experience in R programming are encouraged to apply.

Learning outcomes: R programming skills, research skills such as study design for causal inference in randomized and non-randomized studies, statistical analysis methods (Fisherian, Neymanian, and Bayesian inference), presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Negotiable. Ideally, students are expected to work 5 to 10 hours a week. Length of the project: one semester.

Mentoring: Dr. Bind will be mentoring the undergraduate with the help of Dr. Young Lee (Post-doc). Weekly or bi-weekly mentorship meetings. Students are encouraged to attend group meetings.

Student stipend: Unpaid position. Students are encourage to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities.

Course credit: Students can conduct research for course credit.

Application information: Students should email their resume to Dr. Bind at ma.bind@mail.harvard.edu.

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity with the Stroke microsimulation for Health outcomes and Interventions to Evaluate policies for Long-term Decision-making (SHIELD) Team, HSPH

Contact information: Ankur Pandya, Health Policy and Management (HSPH), anpandya@hsph.harvard.edu, 718 Huntington Ave 2nd floor (Longwood), https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/ankur-pandya/

Project description and duties: Stroke is a leading cause of death, disability, and healthcare costs in the United States. We are developing and applying the SHIELD model to quantify the key tradeoffs among health benefits, risks, and costs for any feasible stroke prevention or treatment policies. Example publications:

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2702211

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0148106

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2396476

All of the research for this project can be (and is currently being done) remotely (i.e., from home as opposed to on campus).

Skills required: No prior research experience is required. Familiarity with working with data, coding in R or C++, and literature reviews could help.

Learning outcomes: Public health research skills such as cost-effectiveness analysis and risk prediction modeling study design, in addition to essential research skills such as literature reviews and scientific manuscript/presentation preparation. Note we are not a wet lab nor do we conduct any research with human subjects -- instead, we work with secondary data and simulation modeling to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of stroke prevention and treatment policies.

Number of hours 5 hours/week for at least 2 semesters (summer included). 

Mentoring: The undergraduate will work closely with Dr. Pandya and Harvard PhD students on the project in addition to several academic physicians from Harvard Medical School and Weill Cornell Medical College who collaborate with the SHIELD modeling team. Student can attend weekly group research meetings (via Zoom), and have mentoring meetings 2-4 times per month with Dr. Pandya (via Zoom).

Student stipend: We can pay $15-20 per hour depending on tasks being performed. 

Course credit: No expected to be applicable unless circumstances call and allow for it.

Application information: Email your resume and a short statement of interest to Dr. Pandya at anpandya@hsph.harvard.edu