Undergraduates: Open Research Positions & Projects

Students: contact Dr. Anna Babakhanyan, Science Undergraduate Research advisor, to help identify research laboratories.
Faculty: if you are interested in posting your open research position, please contact  Dr. Anna Babakhanyan.

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunities in photoimmunotherapy, MGH for summer 2021, Posted April 12, 2021

Dual function antibody conjugates for oral cancer management, MGH (onsite), Posted April 12, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance, MGH (Remote/Onsite Mix), Posted April 12, 2021 

Study of gender, racial disparity, wellness in academic disciplines, with Dr. Fiona Fennessy, BWH, Posted April 5, 2021

Undergraduate research opportunity, Thoracic Surgery Research Labs, MGH, Posted Apr 1, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Lu Lab, HSPH, Posted Mar 26, 2021

Remote undergraduate research opportunity at Surgical Planning Lab, BWH/HMS, Posted Mar 18, 2021 

Remote undergraduate research opportunity at Surgical Planning Lab, BWH/HMS, Posted Mar 18, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, MJ Lab, Harvard Medical School/MGH, Posted Mar 18, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational Biology and Network Medicine, BWH, Posted Mar 10, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Weiss/Dr. McHugh Lab, Division of Alcohol, Drugs, and Addiction, McLean Hospital, Posted Mar 10, 2021

In person/Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, HSPH, Posted Mar 5, 2021

Remote undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Vandana Gupta’s lab, BWH, Posted Mar 5, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Hirschhorn’s Lab, Boston Children's Hospital, Posted Mar 4, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Laboratory of Dr. Chris Walsh, Boston Children’s Hospital, Posted Feb 25, 2021

Scalable engineering of iPSC-derived living blood vessels / In person research opportunity, Prof. Elliot Chaikof lab, BIDMC/HMS, Posted Feb 25, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Assistant, Collaboration between Harvard Medical School and Partners In Health, Posted Feb 23, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Neuroimaging and Deep Learning, Dr. Wang Lab, MGH, Posted Feb 22, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity on Forced Migration and Antenatal Care, FXB Center For Health and Human Rights at Harvard, HSPH, Posted Feb 18, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Clinical Data Science Research Opportunity, Dr. Crowson’s Lab, MEEI, Posted Feb 18, 2021

On site research project in laboratory of Dr. Lichterfeld and Dr. Xu Yu at Ragon Institute, Posted Feb 18 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Osama Hamdy Lab, Joslin Diabetes Center, Feb 17, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Surgical Localization and Mapping Lab, BWH, Posted Feb 17, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in the Aizenberg Biomineralization and Biomimetics Lab, Posted Feb 17, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Surgical Localization and Mapping Lab, BWH, Posted Feb 17, 2021

Design of Intracellular Chromosome Supercoiling Sensor, Remote/In-Person Research Opportunity, MCB, Posted Feb 17, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Marcia Goldberg, MGH, Posted Feb 17, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity: In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Perfusion Imaging of Brain Tumors - Dr. Eva-Maria Ratai Lab, MGH, Posted Feb 17, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Medical Education Research Opportunity, Dr. Miya Bernson-Leung, BCH, Posted Feb 17, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, MGH Biostatistics Center and HMS, Posted Feb 11, 2021

Research Opportunity - Harvard Injury Control Research Center, HSPH, Posted Feb 11, 2021

Lee Kum Sheung Center for Health and Happiness Summer Internship Program, HSPH, Posted Feb 10, 2021

Integrative analysis of ALS plasma metabolomics using machine learning, MIT, Posted Feb 10, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity: Computer recreation of the beginning of life, Dr. Megason Lab, HMS, Posted Feb 10, 2021

Measuring fundamental planet parameters of a multi-planet system discovered by NASA’s TESS mission, Posted Feb 10, 2021

Instrumentation Development for Rubin Observatory, Chile, Posted Feb 9, 2021

On-site and virtual Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Marcia Haigis Lab, HMS, Posted Feb 9, 2021

In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Prof. Vamsi Mootha’s Lab, MGH/Broad/HMS/HHMI, Posted Feb 9, 2021

In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cheng Lab, MGH, Posted Feb 9, 2021

Remote Research Opportunity –Eye Image Analysis by Deep Learning, Posted Feb 9, 2021

Remote Research Opportunity – 3D Street Mapping for Visually Impaired, Posted Feb 9, 2021

Undergraduate Summer Research Project, The Massachusetts Host-Microbiome Center, Posted Feb 9, 2021

Technical Undergraduate Research Assistant, Dr. Martha Bulyk Laboratory, BWH, Posted Feb 9, 2021

In-person/Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Liron Bar-Peled, MGH, Posted Feb 5, 2021

Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering research opportunity at the Rowland Institute, Posted Feb 1, 2021 

Undergraduate neuroscience research opportunity at the Rowland Institute, Posted Jan 14, 2021

Undergraduate Research: MGHfC Digestive Diseases, Posted Jan 5, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Rashidian, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/HMS, Posted Dec 18, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational and Systems Biology at Zomorrodi Lab, HMS, Posted Dec 17, 2020

Undergraduate Research Position, Dr. Weng Lab, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Posted Dec 17, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Drs. Sepucha and Valentine, Health Decision Sciences Center, MGH, Posted Nov 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cognitive Neuroscience Group (CNG), MGH Institute of Health Professions, Posted Nov 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Sang Park, BCH, Posted Sep 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Thoracic Surgery Research at Dr. Yang’s lab, MGH/HMS, Posted Sep 16, 2020

Research Assistant, Demehri Laboratory, Center for Cancer Immunology, Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School, Posted Sep 3, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Radiation Physics and Instrumentation Lab, MGH, Posted Sep 3, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Computational Parasite Genomics, Neafsey Lab, Broad Institute/HSPH, Posted Aug 31, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Evolution of Drug Resistance, Neafsey Lab, Broad Institute/HSPH, Posted Aug 31, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Cancer Genomics at Dr. Kwiatkowski lab, BWH/HMS, Posted Aug 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Tropical Forest Ecology, Dr. Moorcroft Lab, OEB, Posted Aug 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational and Systems Biology at Zomorrodi Lab, HMS, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Industrial Robot, Biorobotics Lab, Harvard SEAS, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Biorobotics Lab, Harvard SEAS, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Synho Do, Ph.D., MGH, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Krichevsky Lab, BWH, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, Department of Statistics, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Undergraduate Research Opportunity with the Stroke microsimulation, HSPH, Posted Aug 26, 2020

 

Spring 2020 Academic Term

Remote or in person (depending on University policy) Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Elisabetta del Re, BIDMC, Posted Jul 2, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cognitive Neuroscience Group (CNG), MGH, Posted Jul 2, 2020

Game Development and Motor Skills, Mahadevan Lab, SEAS, Posted May 18, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational Physics, Dept. of Physics, Posted May 13, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Hirschhorn Lab, Boston Children's Hospital, Posted May 13, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Prof. Mahadevan/Prof. Nagpal Lab, SEAS, Posted May 6, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity: Machine Learning & Applied Physics, Mahadevan Lab, SEAS, Posted May 4, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Lipschitz, Digital Behavioral Health & Informatics Research Program, BWH, Posted May 4, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, LCN, Martinos Center, MGH, Posted May 4, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Hodin’s Gastrointestinal Epithelial Biology Laboratory, MGH, Posted April 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Nanotechnology and photodynamic therapy, MGH, Posted April 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Bioinformatics Research Opportunity – Building a Viral Sequence Database, Dr. Yu Lab, Ragon Institute, Posted April 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in biomedicine, Dr. Zygmanski Lab, BWH, Posted Apr 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Rahme Lab, MGH, Posted Apr 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Gilmore Lab, HMS, Posted Apr 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Scot Martin Lab Group, SEAS/EPS, Posted Apr 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Balu’s Translational Psychiatry Laboratory at McLean Hospital, Posted April 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Chen Lab, MEEI (Mass Eye and Ear), Posted Apr 23, 2020

Undergraduate Remote Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, Department of Statistics, FAS, Posted Apr 23, 2020

Undergraduate research opportunity in the laboratory of Dr. Léger-Abraham, HMS, Posted Mar 18, 2020

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Rakesh Jain, MGH, Harvard, Posted Feb 28, 2020

Undergraduate Position, Human Thyroid Cancers Preclinical and Translational Research Laboratory, BDIMC, Posted Feb 4, 2020

Undergraduate Research Position, MGH Cancer Center, Posted Feb 4, 2020

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Kaiser Lab, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Posted Jan 13, 2020

Undergraduate Research Position, Dr. Maxim Prigozhin Lab, MCB Department, Posted Jan 10, 2020

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Aguayo-Mazzucato Lab, Joslin Diabetes Center, Posted Jan 10, 2020

Research Assistant, Demehri Laboratory, Center for Cancer Immunology, MGH/HMS, Posted Jan 2, 2020

 

April 12, 2021

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunities in photoimmunotherapy, MGH for summer 2021

Contact Information: Tayyaba Hasan, PhD   Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School
Faculty/PI email:  thasan@mgh.harvard.edu
Mentor name:  Pushpamali De Silva, PhD
Mentor primary email:  JLDESILVA@mgh.harvard.edu
Lab location:  Thier 201D

Website: https://hasanlab.mgh.harvard.edu

What we do: PDT is a photochemistry-based approach that is increasingly used to treat a wide number of diseases and requires: (i) light of appropriate wavelength, (ii) a light activatable chemical compound (photosensitizer or PS), and (iii) molecular oxygen.  PDT achieves its cytotoxic effect by producing active molecular species including oxygen radicals and singlet oxygen. The major aspects of PDT that are currently studied in our laboratory are targeted PDT of tumors, site-directed PDT of Microorganisms, mechanism-based PDT combination therapies, Image-guided therapeutics, and model Development.

Project 1 (remote): Biological consequences of photodynamic priming in the pancreatic tumor microenvironment

We are interested in the biological consequences of PDT at both the cellular and molecular level in combination with more traditional therapies such as chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. For that we have conducted in vivo combination treatments with PDT-chemotherapy combination and set up a RNAseq data set that we expect to analyze further to derive combination therapy responses.

Skills required: A basic understanding of tumor biology, some prior knowledge on RNAseq data analysis skills with python or R, and biostatistics preferred.

Learning Outcomes: The selected candidate will undergo training in immunocytology, gene expression analysis, data analysis methodology and data presentation.

Number of Hours: The candidate will be expected to work ~4-5 hours/week though flexibility is considered based on the candidate’s course load.

Mentoring: Dr De Silva will be the primary mentor and will meet with the student no less than twice a week. The student will be able to attend group zoom meetings where applicable. Mentoring will also involve walking through details of lab procedures and monitoring these are performed in accordance with best practices.

Student Stipend: This is a volunteer position. We have no funding available for this position but would be willing to help selected students identify funding mechanisms.

Application Information: Please email your resume to Laura Maddox for the Hasan Labs at Lbmaddox@mgh.harvard.edu and copy JLDESILVA@mgh.harvard.edu

Project 2 (onsite): “Photodynamic-priming of pancreatic tumors for conquering inherent resistant barriers to immunotherapy

There is an unmet need for innovative research findings that would increase the 5-year survival rate in patients with pancreatic cancer, which in fact has seen only small increments over the past two decades. Our ongoing work investigates a possibility to enhance anti-tumor immune response against pancreatic cancer with PDT-immunotherapy combination treatment. We are incorporating in vitro models for the therapeutic modeling and will be utilizing different immune and molecular assays for this work.

Skills required: A basic understanding of tumor biology and basic skills in cell culture preferred.

Learning Outcomes: The selected candidate will undergo training in cell culture, flow cytometry, immunocytology, gene expression analysis and data analysis.

Location: The project requires considerable bench work and the candidate is expected to work on-site in the Hasan lab at Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital. This will require an exception form to be filed for onsite work at MGH and the student is expected to adhere to all COVID safety rules.

Number of Hours: The candidate will be expected to work a minimum of 20 hours/week through the summer although there is flexibility in hours depending on the candidate’s course load.

Mentoring: Dr De Silva will be the primary mentor and will meet with the student no less than twice a week. The student will be able to attend group zoom meetings where applicable. Mentoring will also involve walking through details of lab procedures and monitoring these are performed in accordance with best practices.

Student Stipend: This is a volunteer position.  We have no funding available for this position but would be willing to help selected students identify funding mechanisms.

Application Information: Please email your resume to Laura Maddox for the Hasan Labs at Lbmaddox@mgh.harvard.edu and copy JLDESILVA@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

 

Dual function antibody conjugates for oral cancer management, MGH (onsite)

Contact Information: Tayyaba Hasan, PhD   Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School

Faculty/PI email:  thasan@mgh.harvard.edu
Mentor name:  Mohammad Ahsan Saad, PhD
Mentor primary email:  MSAAD1@mgh.harvard.edu
Lab location:  Thier 201D
Website: https://hasanlab.mgh.harvard.edu

Project description and duties:

Precision imaging is an important tool for diagnosing and guiding tumor therapies. In context of oral cancers, precision imaging can be used for guiding tumor resection surgeries, the primary method of oral cancer management in USA. To assist in image-guidance during oral cancer surgeries and address concerns regarding residual microscopic disease, post-surgery, this project deals with the development of molecular-targeted probes for real-time multimodal imaging of oral cancer tissues and photodynamic therapy of residual microscopic disease. The candidate will be expected to perform culturing of cancer cells, synthesize conjugates with imaging and therapeutic properties and perform a significant amount of cell microscopy.

Skills required: Candidates with strong interests in chemical synthesis, development of in vitro tumor models and bio-medical imaging are encouraged to apply.

Location: The project requires considerable bench work and the candidate is expected to work on-site in the Hasan lab at Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital. This will require an exception form to be filed for onsite work at MGH and the student is expected to adhere to all COVID safety rules.

Learning Outcomes: The selected candidate will be involved and trained in the synthesis and characterization of molecular targeted imaging probes, fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging (acquisition and analysis) of in vitro tumor tissue phantoms, photodynamic therapy of in vitro oral cancer models and tumor cell viability assessments.

Number of Hours: The candidate will be expected to work a minimum of 20 hours/week through the summer although there is flexibility in hours depending on the candidate’s course load.

Mentoring: Dr Saad will be the primary mentor and will meet with the student no less than twice a week. The student will be able to attend group zoom meetings where applicable. Mentoring will also involve walking through details of lab procedures and monitoring these are performed in accordance with best practices. 

Student Stipend: This is a volunteer position. We have no funding available for this position but would be willing to help selected students identify funding mechanisms.

Application Information: Please email your resume to Laura Maddox for the Hasan Labs at Lbmaddox@mgh.harvard.edu and copy MSAAD1@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance, MGH (Remote/Onsite Mix)


Contact Information: Tayyaba Hasan, PhD   Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School
Faculty/PI email:  thasan@mgh.harvard.edu
Mentor name:  Yanfang Feng, PhD
Mentor primary email:  yfeng0@mgh.harvard.edu
Lab location:  Thier 201D (but partially remote position)
Website: https://hasanlab.mgh.harvard.edu

Project information:

Critically high levels of antibiotic resistance have been found all over the world. However, effective treatment strategies against bacterial pathogens with antibiotic resistance are still lacking. One key research topic of our group is bacterial antibiotic resistance led by β-lactamases, one type of enzymes bacteria could use to degrade and thus fail the prescribed antibiotic. Fortunately, drugs that could inhibit these enzymes, namely, β-lactamase inhibitors, have been developed and entering the market now. By coupling fluorescence identification of β-lactamase activity with antibiotic susceptibility testing, we are aiming to disclose the quantitative relationship between β-lactamase inhibition and bacterial drug susceptibility restoration during β-lactamase inhibitor treatment. If successful, this work will provide the infectious disease society practical scientific grounds for regulating the use of β-lactamase inhibitors in order to achieve the best clinical outcome.

Skills required: A basic understanding of bacteriology, enzyme kinetics and biostatistics. Prior knowledge on genetic sequencing technology and the related data analysis is a plus.

Learning Outcomes: The selected candidate will undergo training in bacteriology, study design, data analysis,  and data presentation.

Number of Hours: The candidate will be expected to work a minimum of 20 hours/week through the summer although there is flexibility in hours depending on the candidate’s course load. This position is entirely remote/not onsite due to COVID restrictions.

Mentoring: Dr Feng will be the primary mentor and will meet with the student no less than twice a week. The student will be able to attend group zoom meetings where applicable. Mentoring will also involve walking through details of lab procedures and monitoring these are performed in accordance with best practices.

Student Stipend: This is a volunteer position. We have no funding available for this position but would be willing to help selected students identify funding mechanisms.

Application Information: Please email your resume to Laura Maddox for the Hasan Labs at Lbmaddox@mgh.harvard.edu and copy yfeng0@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

April 5, 2021

 

Study of gender, racial disparity, wellness in academic disciplines, with Dr. Fiona Fennessy, BWH

Contact information: Fiona Fennessy, MD PhD, Wellness Officer, Dept of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, ffennessy@bwh.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: Performing gender, racial disparity and wellness searches in academic disciplines and professional societies

Skills required: Statistical and social media skills

Learning outcomes: research skills such as metanalysis, bibliometrics, systematic reviews and scientific writing

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project; negotiable

Mentoring: All mentoring and meetings will be through ZOOM meetings. Students will work with a team of MDs- medical student, fellows and attendings who are currently working on projects. Meetings can be once-twice/week, once the research plan is clear to the student.

Student stipend: Volunteer position.

Application information: Email your resume to Dr. Fiona Fennessy at ffennessy@bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

April 1, 2021

Undergraduate research opportunity, Thoracic Surgery Research Labs, MGH

Uma Sachdeva, MD, PhD and Yolonda Colson, MD, PhD

Division of Thoracic Surgery

Massachusetts General Hospital

Simches Research Center

185 Cambridge St.

Boston, MA 02114

Description of the project and duties:

Our lab seeks to identify molecular pathways underlying the development and progression of esophageal cancer. Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer and sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Projects investigate the contribution of stress response pathways to the development of esophageal cancer. Common molecular and cell biology techniques will be utilized, including PCR, quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, Western blotting, cell culture and transfection, and 3D organoid culture. PI is committed to training and mentoring student towards honors thesis and involvement in manuscript preparation and publication with co-authorship.

Skills required. (Are students expected to have any laboratory skills, if so what are they?) If no prior research experience is required, state so and it will encourage students to apply since most do not have prior research experience.

No prior laboratory research experience is required, but students must have a strong interest and commitment to learning and to the scientific discovery process. Meticulous record keeping, strong communication skills, and strong writing skills are preferred.

Learning outcome: laboratory skills, research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentations, scientific writing, etc.

Students will learn cell and molecular biology techniques, study design, data analysis, and scientific writing. Participation in lab meetings will teach scientific presentation skills. PI is an alumna of Harvard College with a strong commitment to scientific mentoring.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if it is negotiable, state so)

Students should plan to work a minimum of 10 hours per week.

Mentoring: who will be mentoring student, how often are mentorship meetings, etc.

Primary mentoring will be by PI Uma Sachdeva, a thoracic surgeon at MGH and alumna of Harvard College (Kirkland House). Dr Sachdeva is starting a new laboratory effort in esophageal cancer at MGH, under the strong mentorship of Dr Yolonda Colson, Chief of the Division of Thoracic Surgery at MGH. Students will work with Dr Sachdeva daily, and will participate in joint lab meetings weekly. Mentorship towards graduate or professional schools will be provided by Drs. Sachdeva and Colson, who are both committed to mentor the next generation of translational scientists.

Does laboratory provide any funds to pay student’s stipend? If not state that students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

Students are encouraged to apply for course credit, including towards an honors thesis in an area of biomedical sciences, with strong mentorship provided towards this end. Students are also encouraged to apply for funding through the HCRP, with PI mentorship commitment towards this goal.

What information students need to submit and contact information for submitting this information: (ex. Email your resume to Dr. Smith at ….)

Email your resume with a cover letter to Dr Sachdeva at uma.sachdeva@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

March 26, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Lu Lab, HSPH

Quan Lu Lab, Dept of Environmental Health, HSPH, https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/quan-lu/

Project Description: Discovery of inhibitors of GSDMB-mediated pyroptosis

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S009167491830023X

https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/newsplus/gene-linked-with-lower-asthma-risk-identified/

No skills required.

Learning outcome: Basic Molecular Biology and Biochemistry techniques; study design; data analysis, presentations

Mentoring: Ronald Panganiban, 2-3 times/week

Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

Please email Ronald Panganiban at rpangan@hsph.harvard.edu (https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/ronald-panganiban/) with any questions. Please email resume as well.

 

 

March 18, 2021

Remote undergraduate research opportunity at Surgical Planning Lab, BWH/HMS 

Contact information: Nazim Haouchine and Sarah Frisken, Harvard Medical School. Radiology Department. Email: nhaouchine@bwh.harvard.edu, sfrisken@bwh.harvard.edu, 75 Francis Street, Boston MA 02115

Project description and duties:

The Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) is a computer science oriented laboratory in the Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School. The SPL is looking for a motivated student to develop an automated 3D-3D registration system between preoperative and  intraoperative 3D models of patients’ heads. The candidate will first test existing techniques for 3D face reconstruction (open source code is available), then a registration algorithm using facial landmarks (eyes, nose ...) extracted from both 3D models. The student can leverage deep learning methods to automatically extract facial landmarks. The candidate will be working with computer scientists and surgeons from the department of Radiology and Neurosorgy.

Skills required: Experience in programming in Python and ability to quickly prototype algorithms but it’s not necessary. Understanding of image processing and 3D geometry modeling. Basic knowledge in Machine learning is a plus. Motivation !

Learning outcomes:

This position provides an excellent opportunity to be involved in cutting-edge research in surgical navigation, and offers a stimulating environment to work closely with engineers, computer scientists, radiologists and surgeons. The position also offers the opportunity of observing surgical procedures in our state-of-the-art operating room using intraoperative imaging. The candidate will also gain valuable written and oral communication skills, and the possibility for co-authorship on publications.

Number of hours: Minimal commitment of 30 hours per week. 12 to 16 weeks. Flexible.

Mentoring:

Students will be mentored by a senior Post-doctoral Researcher in the group and meet with the mentor 1-2 times per week via zoom. Students can also attend weekly group meetings / talks and can connect with other members of the group. Students will also get regular feedback from neurosurgeons.

Student stipend: The position is a volunteer position. However, a stipend could be offered.

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Nazim Haouchine at nhaouchine@bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote undergraduate research opportunity at Surgical Planning Lab, BWH/HMS

Contact information: Nazim Haouchine and Sarah Frisken, Harvard Medical School. Radiology Department. Email: nhaouchine@bwh.harvard.edu, sfrisken@bwh.harvard.edu, 75 Francis Street, Boston MA 02115

Project description and duties:

The Surgical Planning Laboratory (SPL) is a computer science oriented laboratory in the Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School. The SPL is looking for a motivated student to develop a tool to synthesize 2D XRay images. The idea is to be able to create a large dataset of XRay images to be used later with a deep learning model. Open source is already available. The student will have to test and try the existing techniques (GAN, Image Analogy). The candidate will be working with computer scientists and surgeons from the department of Radiology and Neurosorgy.

Skills required: Experience in programming in Python and ability to quickly prototype algorithms but it’s not necessary. Understanding of image processing and 3D geometry modeling. Basic knowledge in Machine learning is a plus. Motivation !

Learning outcomes:

This position provides an excellent opportunity to be involved in cutting-edge research in surgical navigation, and offers a stimulating environment to work closely with engineers, computer scientists, radiologists and surgeons. The position also offers the opportunity of observing surgical procedures in our state-of-the-art operating room using intraoperative imaging. The candidate will also gain valuable written and oral communication skills, and the possibility for co-authorship on publications.

Number of hours: Minimal commitment of 30 hours per week. 12 to 16 weeks. Flexible.

Mentoring:  Students will be mentored by a senior Post-doctoral Researcher in the group and meet with the mentor 1-2 times per week via zoom. Students can also attend weekly group meetings / talks and can connect with other members of the group. Students will also get regular feedback from neurosurgeons.

Student stipend: The position is a volunteer position. However, a stipend could be offered.

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Nazim Haouchine at nhaouchine@bwh.harvard.edu

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, MJ Lab, Harvard Medical School/MGH

Contact information: Dr. Jalali, MGH Institute for Technology Assessment, https://scholar.harvard.edu/jalali

Project description and duties: MJ Lab develops and uses simulation models and data science methods to understand complex public health issues and inform decision and policy making. The lab invites undergraduate students for research opportunities all year round—underrepresented minorities are especially encouraged to apply. The candidates are expected to assist the research team with literature search, data analysis, and writing the results. There are several ongoing analytical and modeling projects at the lab; one of the major areas of research is the development of a national, population-level simulation model to inform opioid policies and conduct economic evaluations. The lab has also been analyzing the impacts of COVID-19 on opioid overdose deaths and opioid use disorder treatment. A new area of research includes the analysis of polysubstance and illicit stimulant use, use disorder, and overdose.

Skills required: Excellent writing and communication skills are required. Priority goes to motivated and organized individuals, committed to doing impactful population health research, with great attention to detail. Experience in data analysis, programming, mathematical modeling, machine learning, or text mining is not required but preferred.

Learning outcomes: Students will gain experience in review and assimilation of literature, data analysis and visualization, and composition of presentations and presentation of the results. Students are often involved in more than one project to provide them with the opportunity to explore different areas of research.

Number of hours: Flexible. Students work from 6 to 15 hours per week depending on their availability. More hours are expected during the summer.

Mentoring: Students will work in a collaborative, productive, and friendly research team, working closely with research associates and postdoc researchers. All project teams meet regularly with the PI and discuss the research. The PI is passionate about meeting with students to advise about the preparation of graduate school applications and career development.

Student stipend: One paid and three unpaid positions are available. Students are welcome to take credits for research at their programs. The PI will support students to apply for undergraduate research fellowships such as HCRP.

Application information: Candidates should send their CV to Dr. Jalali (msjalali@mgh.harvard.edu). Please put “Undergraduate Research Opportunity” in the subject, provide your availability over the spring and summer semesters, and feel free to ask any questions.

 

 

March 10, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational Biology and Network Medicine, BWH

Contact information: Dr. Kimberly Glass, Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, email: kimberly.glass@channing.harvard.edu; website: sites.google.com/a/channing.harvard.edu/kimberlyglass

Project description and duties: This project will involve downloading and analyzing publicly available chromatin structure (HiC) data. This will include cleaning, processing, and characterizing the data. The primary objective of the project will be to create a map linking distal DNA regions to promoter regions of genes based on the data. A secondary objective of the project will be to add other genomic information, such as the location of transcription factor binding sites, to this map.

Skills required: Necessary skills include (1) basic programming experience in languages such as python, R, or MATLAB, (2) good writing and communication skills, including familiarity with Microsoft Office products, (3) ability to respond to feedback and work well with a diverse team, (4) basic familiarity with molecular biology (eg what is DNA, RNA, gene, protein). No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcomes: Over the course of the project, the student will obtain basic skills for computational biology research, including learning how to find and read relevant scientific papers, learning how to obtain and perform basic processing of large Omics data, and learning many concepts important for multi-Omic data integration, gene regulation, and network modeling. In addition, the supportive research environment our group fosters will provide the student with insights into what it is like to do computational research in an academic setting.

Number of hours: Number of hours and project duration is flexible.

Mentoring: The student will have dedicated 30 min meetings with Dr. Glass every other week as well as weekly meetings with a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Glass’ group. Attendance at Dr. Glass’ biweekly (two times a week) lab group meeting will also be strongly encouraged, but not required.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position.

Application information: Interested applicants should send an email explaining their interest in the project together with a recent resume to kimberly.glass@channing.harvard.edu.

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Weiss/Dr. McHugh Lab, Division of Alcohol, Drugs, and Addiction, McLean Hospital

Contact Information: Drs. Roger Weiss and Kate McHugh, contact information: rweiss@mclean.harvard.edu, kmchugh@mclean.harvard.edu Location: Remote, Lab Website: Alcohol and Drug Clinical Research (wordpress.com)

Project description and duties: Student volunteers will be involved in ongoing research projects relating to the understanding and treatment of substance use disorders. Students will have the opportunity to learn data collection techniques, cleaning and maintenance of datasets, basic research skills, literature review skills, scientific writing skills, and the possibility for involvement in manuscript preparation. Students will have the opportunity for poster presentations and and/or manuscript preparation if interested. Volunteers will participate in weekly lab meetings and division didactic seminars, optional participation in hospital-wide didactics. Depending on hospital policies, in-person opportunities may be available. Students will have the opportunity to see the clinical research process, from development of measures to data analysis to the drafting of manuscripts. See relevant publications from our department below:

Validation of the craving scale in a large sample of adults with substance use disorders - ScienceDirect

Depression history as a predictor of outcomes during buprenorphine-naloxone treatment of prescription opioid use disorder - ScienceDirect

Long-term naturalistic follow-up of chronic pain in adults with prescription opioid use disorder - ScienceDirect

Long-term outcomes from the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study - ScienceDirect

Skills required: No prior research experience is required. New undergraduate researchers are encouraged to apply.

Learning outcomes: Research skills such as study design, basic data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: 4 hours minimum per week.

Mentoring: Drs. Weiss, McHugh, Hilton. Graduate research assistants within the department. Other opportunities for informal mentorship are available throughout the division depending on student interests. Students will also be expected to regularly join weekly research lab meetings.

Student stipend: This is an unpaid volunteer student visitor research position.

Application information: Please submit your curriculum vitae/resume and a cover letter to Hannah Shapiro at hshapiro2@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

March 5, 2021

In person/Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, HSPH

Prof. Doug Brownfield lab., Harvard School of Public Health

 

Contact information:

Prof.  Doug Brownfield

brownfield@hsph.harvard.edu

Department of Environmental Health

MIPS Program, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
665 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115

Building 1, Ground Floor G7 & G10

lab website: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/brownfield-lab/

 

Project description:

Prof. Brownfield lab., studies how the lung development in mammals from embryonic time to adulthood. In particular, the interest is focused on understanding how the lung alveolar space is constructed during development and disrupted during diseases. The lab applies genetic tools in in-vivo mice models and in-vitro cell culture models as research approaches.

 

Duties:

In person: Mice lineages genotyping/PCR, immune-histochemistry (IHC) and immune-cytochemistry (ICC), fixed tissues sectioning. Previous wet lab experience is a plus.

Remotely: Imaging analysis for both static and time-lapses of 2D and 3D cell cultures and fixed lung tissues. Literature search, and animal database maintenance. Previous bioinformatic experience (ex. Matlab, R) is a plus.

 

Learning outcomes: The student will receive training for the tasks he/she is involved such as PCR/genotyping, IHC and ICC, the preparation of fixed tissues and imaging data analysis. During the apprenticeship the student will learn how to work an experimental protocol, how to analyze the data, how to present and critically discuss the results, how to collaborate in a scientific environment.

 

Number of hours

The student is expected to be in the lab daily and work ~40 hours/week; equivalent time should be allocated for the working remotely position. Flexibility is considered based on the candidate’s course load.

 

Mentoring:

The student will be mentored by Dr. Brownfield, who will check weekly on the student’s progress. Dr. Elisa Ghelfi will be the daily assistant-mentor for the lab and image analysis work. The student is expected to attend lab Zoom meeting, discuss his/her results and present data.

 

Student stipend: This is an unpaid, volunteer position.

 

Application information:

If interested, please direct your email with your CV/Resume to:

Dr. Brownfield (brownfield@hsph.harvard.edu)

Dr. Elisa Ghelfi (eghelfi@hsph.harvard.edu).

A cover letter detailing your scientific interests and career goals would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

Remote undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Vandana Gupta’s lab, BWH

Contact information: Vandana A Gupta and Division of Genetics, Email: vgupta@research.bwh.harvard.edu, 77 Avenue Louie Pasteur, NRB-1,  Lab website: https://guptalab.bwh.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: The project will include a detailed analysis of the clinical and pharmacological information of a cohort of patients affected with neuromuscular diseases to identify specific triggers contributing to the clinical presentation. Currently, this position is remote but in future may be expended to the experimental studies including analysis of the factors identified from this work in animal and cellular models.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required. 

Learning outcomes: Research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing. Students are encouraged to present their data in lab and division meetings and contribute to manuscripts.

Number of hours: Minimum 10 hours per week

Mentoring: PI and other lab members will provide the mentorship. Students are encouraged to attend weekly lab meetings (currently on zoom) and will have weekly mentorship matings.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position

Application information: Please email your resume to Vandana Gupta: vgupta@research.bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

March 4, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Hirschhorn’s Lab, Boston Children's Hospital

Contact information: Joel Hirschhorn, Department of Endocrinology, Joel.Hirschhorn@childrens.harvard.edu, Boston Children's Hospital Center for Life Science building 16th floor, https://www.joelhirschhornlab.org/

Project description and duties: Human genetics has the potential to uncover new disease biology and predict health outcomes. Genome-wide association studies have identified hundreds of thousands of genetic variants associated with human diseases and traits, but translating these associations to actionable biology is difficult. This project aims to use data from the world’s largest genome-wide association studies, of height and measures of obesity, to identify genes, pathways, and specific variants as likely to have causal influences on human weight regulation and skeletal growth. Depending on the background and interest of the student, analysis in biobank-scale sequence data, polygenic risk scores comprised of phenotypically similar subsets of associated variants, or integrated analysis of genetic and metabolite data may also be feasible. A strong background in computational skills, human/population genetics or (ideally) both will help the applicant be successful in this project.
Student will be expected to use available genetic and computational biology software, including cloud-based computing, to analyze large datasets and evaluate results.

Skills required: Computer Science and Biology background; preferably experience with Python or R, unix, and an interest in human genetics.

Learning outcomes: general research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing, as well as hands-on experience working with large human genetics datasets.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: negotiable, between 8-40 hours/wk. At least summer, but extended duration negotiable.

Mentoring: regular (daily-weekly) meetings with graduate student or postdoctoral fellow advisor, regular (1 per 2 weeks) meetings with PI and graduate student/postdoc advisor. Student is encouraged to attend lab meetings and present on work.

Student stipend: Stipend is available at standard Boston Children’s rates; students seeking a stipend are strongly encouraged to apply for any applicable summer research fellowships. Course credit: Students can also conduct research for course credit (however, a student cannot earn course credit and be paid a stipend in the same semester).

Application information: Email your resume to Dr. Joel Hirschhorn at Joel.Hirschhorn@childrens.harvard.edu

 

Feb 25, 2021

Scalable engineering of iPSC-derived living blood vessels / In person research opportunity, Prof. Elliot Chaikof lab, BIDMC/HMS
Contact information: Dr. Torsten Meissner, tmeissne@bidmc.harvard.edu

Project description and duties:

The goal of this project is to engineer immune-silent living blood vessels from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) that can be transplanted into all patients without the risk of immune rejection. With cardiovascular disease being on the rise and the number one cause of death in the developed world, the applications for such vessels are enormous, ranging from disease modelling, to drug screening, and vascular reconstruction.

The student will gain hands-on experience in culture and genetic manipulation of human iPSC and assist with their differentiation into endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, that can be used for tissue engineering, as well as their phenotypic characterization. The student will be embedded in a multidisciplinary research environment consisting of biologists, material scientists, engineers and medical professionals each providing a different expertise to the project.

(ACS Biomater Sci Eng. 2020, PMID: 32685675; PNAS USA. 2019, PMID: 31040209; Nat Cell Biol. 2015 PMID: 26214132)

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32685675/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31040209/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26214132/

Skills required:  Prior experience with basic molecular biology techniques, tissue culture, and/or coding (R) is a plus.
Learning outcomes: This internship experience will provide the student with the opportunity to learn:

  • Culture of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC)
  • Genetic modification of iPSC using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and various base editors
  • Directed differentiation of modified iPSC into vascular wall cells (endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells)
  • Tissue engineering of living vascular grafts using a collagen bioprinter
  • Characterization of the tissue grafts using single cell RNAseq as well as various immune assays

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project

Ideally, we are looking to establish a long-term relationship with a student for the duration of 1-2 years, that should result in the completion of a senior research thesis. We can work with the student and their schedule to decide on the number of hours per week during the school year but expect a full-time commitment of 2-3 months for at least one summer to allow for completion of an independent research project. The lab is located at the Center for Life Science (CLS) in Longwood, which is a 20 min ride on the M2 shuttle from the main campus.
Mentoring: Dr. Torsten Meissner will be the direct supervisor and mentor of the student. Dr. Meissner has a broad knowledge of stem cell engineering, cell differentiation and immunology, and will teach, guide and advise the student. In addition, he will video meet with the student weekly or as much as needed in person to discuss progress. The student will also have the opportunity to attend the Chaikof lab group meetings - currently via Zoom - and present their work at the end of the summer.
Student stipend: This is a volunteer position.
Application information:  Please e-mail your resume/CV along with a one-page cover letter including a brief outline of your previous experiences, interests, goals, and anticipated time availability to Dr. Meissner (tmeissne@bidmc.harvard.edu).

 

 

Feb 23, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Assistant, Collaboration between Harvard Medical School and Partners In Health

Contact information:  Bethany Hedt-Gauthier, PhD
Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Bethany_Gauthier@hms.harvard.edu
https://globalcovid19respo.wixsite.com/website

Project description and duties:
The overall goal of the work is to assess the impact of COVID-19 on patients with HIV or non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries. We are seeking two research assistants for this project. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the Partners In Health Cross-Site COVID Cohort Research Network, one research assistant would support a retrospective cohort of patients with non-communicable diseases living in Mexico while the second would support a retrospective cohort of patients with HIV in Haiti. The goal of these projects is to use electronic medical record data to assess how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected care utilization, care provision, and health outcomes among chronic care patients. Key responsibilities would include cleaning and processing de-identified datasets, generating reports describing the data, and attending meetings with our colleagues from Haiti and Mexico. The two research assistants would be encouraged to collaborate and support each other.

Skills required:

- Intermediate or advanced mathematical or statistical background

- Previous experience in Stata (desired), R, SAS, or similar

- Interest in global health and commitment to global health equity

- Self-directed worker

Learning outcomes: The successful candidate would build their quantitative analysis skills and gain exposure to global health research. The individual would have direct exposure of how quantitative analysis informs program design and delivery in these contexts. They would be invited to present their progress to colleagues in seven countries through the Cross-Site COVID Cohort Research Network working group.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: Students would be expected to work 20-40 hours per week during the summer, depending on the experience of the candidate. Hours can be flexible, though some team meetings would be required. There may be opportunity for this experience to continue past the summer, depending on the student’s goals and performance.

Mentoring: Students will be mentored by Dr. Dale Barnhart, an epidemiologist and co-founder of the Partners In Health Cross-Site COVID Cohort Research Network, and by Dr. Hedt-Gauthier, faculty at Harvard Medical School. Joint mentorship meetings will occur bi-weekly via zoom. The students may be able to attend other team meetings, based on interest and topics.

Student stipend: Volunteer position. We have no funding available for this position, but would be willing to help selected students identify funding mechanisms.

Application information: Please submit your cover letter (1 page), resume or CV, and a 1-2 page writing sample (topic does not matter) to Dale Barnhart at dale_barnhart@hms.harvard.edu. Please put: “Harvard Undergrad RA: LASTNAME” in the subject line. In your cover letter, please a) describe how this position fits into your overall education and professional goals and b) indicate whether you are applying specifically to the NCD or HIV position or if you are willing to be considered for either position.

 

Feb 22, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Neuroimaging and Deep Learning, Dr. Wang Lab, MGH

Contact information:

Dr. Hui Wang, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School/Massachusetts General Hospital, hwang47@mgh.harvard.edu, https://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/lab/lcn

Project description and duties:

Clinical evidences have substantially extended the functional scope of cerebellum from sensorimotor control to a wide range of cognitions and emotions. However, the underlying structural basis to support the cognitive functions has not been established in human, which hampers the development of targeted therapies. The project aims to develop a multi-scale imaging framework to elucidate the neuroarchitecture and connectivity maps of the human cerebellum. The framework pivots on the fusion of high-resolution ex vivo MRI and automated serial-sectioning polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (as-PSOCT) to enable tissue samples to be interrogated from single cells to the entire brain.

The undergraduate will be responsible for processing our high-resolution MRI data on the cerebellum, conducting learning-based segmentation for cerebellar structures, and working with our collaborator to create a model-based cerebellar surface.

Skills required:

The applicants should have engineering or computer science background, with demonstrated programing experience. Familiarity with Neuroimaging is a plus, but not necessary.

Learning outcomes:

  • Learn basic neuroanatomy and neuroimaging software
  • Develop skills in using deep learning and image segmentation tools
  • Practice presentation and scientific writing skills

Number of hours:

Students are expected to work full time for 10 weeks between June and August. The start date is negotiable.

Mentoring:

Dr. Wang will mentor the undergraduate and meet with the student weekly via zoom. The student will remotely interact with research technicians and postdocs in the lab. The student is invited to attend weekly lab meeting and present the work at the end of the summer.

Student stipend:

Volunteer. Funding can be available if the student likes to continue the work in the following semester.

Application information:

Please email a statement of interest and your CV to hwang47@mgh.harvard.edu

 

Feb 18, 2021

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity on Forced Migration and Antenatal Care, FXB Center For Health and Human Rights at Harvard, HSPH

PI :  Pr. Jacqueline Bhabha, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard, HSPH, https://fxb.harvard.edu

Contact person:  Dr. Vasileia Digidiki, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard, HSPH,  vdigidik@hsph.harvard.edu

Project descriptionAccess to timely antenatal care is considered an effective method to ensure successful pregnancy outcomes, as well as lifelong health for mothers and their children. However, in the context of humanitarian crises, asylum seeking women face significant barriers to accessing antenatal care leading to a series of poor perinatal outcomes and risks to the health of both young mothers and their babies, furthering health inequalities for this vulnerable population. This differentially influences several perinatal health outcomes including mental health, mortality of both mother and child, mode of delivery, birth weight, preterm birth, congenital anomalies, and other morbidities. As the pandemic has already disrupted humanitarian operations in the field, including access to health services in informal and formal camps, it is expected that the antenatal care experience of asylum seeking women has been further deteriorated. 

This exploratory study seeks to make visible the lived experiences of Central- American asylum seeking pregnant women stranded at three critical transit cities at the US- Mexican borders: Monterrey, Tijuana and Matamoros. Given the significant number of pregnant women stranded in these cities in perilous and often informal settings for prolonged periods of time, the study aims to explore  current access to antenatal care and document the impact of the pandemic on their antenatal care experiences.

Duties of the Research Assistant: The research assistant will contribute to the review of the existing literature, participate in the process of data collection (data collection will take place through Zoom) under supervision and assist with transcription and translation of the collected data. They will also be trained in data analysis and contribute to the writing up of findings as needed.

Skills required:   Applicants should be fluent in Spanish and English.  No prior research experience is needed. 

Learning outcomes: The Research assistant will enhance their knowledge on forced migration and antenatal care during the pandemic, develop skills on data collection and data analysis, and improve their scientific writing.

Number of hours  The research assistant will be asked to engage during data collection which will take place between mid-March to May. For this period of time we anticipate a time commitment of 10-14 hours per week. After that, the research assistant is expected to spend 6-8 hours a week on this project.

Length of the project: March- July

MentoringThe Research Assistant will be mentored by the PI and the Project Leader. The research assistant will have the opportunity to attend regular Zoom meetings, the frequency of which will depend on the immediate needs  of the project. (eg. During data collection, meetings may be more frequent).  

Student stipendThis is a volunteer position

Application informationE-mail your CV and cover letter describing yourself and your experience to Dr Vasileia Digidiki, vdigidik@hsph.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Clinical Data Science Research Opportunity, Dr. Crowson’s Lab, Mass Eye & Ear

Contact information:
Matthew G. Crowson MD MPA MASc FRCSC

Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery
243 Charles Street
Boston, Massachusetts
02114 USA

Email: matthew_crowson@meei.harvard.edu

Laboratory Website: https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/crow/people/matthew-g-crowson

Harvard Catalyst Profile: https://connects.catalyst.harvard.edu/Profiles/display/Person/193106

Project description and duties:

Dr. Crowson’s work involves applying data science techniques (i.e. machine learning and its various forms) to clinical data. Dr. Crowson has several ongoing projects including innovative applications of:

-Computer vision for image segmentation as part of autonomous surgery,

-Natural Language Processing for clinical notes,

-Among others.

Dr. Crowson also performs ‘traditional’ clinical research using existing clinical data from the electronic health record. Further, Dr. Crowson also generates systematic reviews and other review-style manuscripts of interest to the machine learning and Otolaryngology fields.

Example prior projects:

Crowson MG, Dixon P, Mahmood R, Lee JW, Shipp D, Le T, Lin V, Chen J, Chan TCY. Predicting Postoperative Cochlear Implant Performance Using Supervised Machine Learning. Otol Neurotol. 2020 Sep; 41(8):e1013-e1023. PMID: 32558750.

Crowson MG, Lee JW, Hamour A, Mahmood R, Babier A, Lin V, Tucci DL, Chan TCY. AutoAudio: Deep Learning for Automatic Audiogram Interpretation. J Med Syst. 2020 Aug 07; 44(9):163. PMID: 32770269.

Crowson MG, Hamour A, Lin V, Chen JM, Chan TCY. Machine learning for pattern detection in cochlear implant FDA adverse event reports. Cochlear Implants Int. 2020 11; 21(6):313-322. PMID: 32623971.

Skills required:

Some experience with statistics and computer programming languages such as Python or R strongly recommended. Students do not necessarily need to consider medicine as a possible career, as computer science and engineering students would also benefit from such an experience.  Experience with machine learning techniques preferred.
Learning outcomes:

Goals for this research experience is to improve competency in data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing. Deliverables such as 1-2 peer reviewed manuscripts with student serving as first-author on the manuscript if work completed. The student may complete additional manuscripts if motivated.

Relevant texts for methods of the lab:

* Applied Predictive Modeling. by Max Kuhn and Kjell Johnson. ISBN-10: 1461468485

* R for Data Science: Import, Tidy, Transform, Visualize, and Model Data by Hadley Wickham and Garrett Grolemund. ISBN-10: 1491910399
Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project

Negotiable.
Mentoring:

Dr. Crowson, the principal investigator, will be the primary mentor. Research meetings will be held weekly, as well as continued daily contact using a mobile/web-based platform (e.g. Discord or Slack).
Student stipend:

Pending Mass General Brigham HR policies.
Application information:

Email your resume/CV to Dr. Crowson at matthew_crowson@meei.harvard.edu. Please also include a 1-2 paragraph statement of i) what you hope to get out of this research experience, and ii) ideas for future career plans.

 

 

On site research project in laboratory of Dr. Lichterfeld and Dr. Xu Yu at Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard

Contact information: Mathias Lichterfeld (mlichterfeld@mgh.harvard.edu, https://www.ragoninstitute.org/portfolio-item/lichterfeld/) and Xu Yu (xyu@partners.org; https://www.ragoninstitute.org/portfolio-item/yu-lab)

Project description and duties: Lab focuses on HIV cure research and uses wide spectrum of novel single-cell analytic techniques for characterizing HIV-infected cells. Summer students will be involved in performing PCR assays, gel electrophoresis and other biological experiments under supervision; generating figures and presentations. Experience can be customized to applicants interests and skills

Skills required: some prior experience with basic laboratory techniques and basic knowledge in biostatistics and coding/computational data analysis helpful

Learning outcomes: understanding next-generation sequencing technologies, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours 20-40 hours per week

Mentoring: In person meetings with lab personnel, typically technicians, postdocs and PI

Student stipend: Stipend is available

Application information: Email resume and description of interests to Dr. Lichterfeld or Dr. Yu

 

 

Feb 17, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Osama Hamdy Lab, Joslin Diabetes Center – Virtual or in-person

Contact information:  Dr. Osama Hamdy
Joslin Diabetes Center  One Joslin Place  Boston, MA 02115

https://www.joslin.org/find-an-expert/osama-hamdy

Project description and duties: This internship experience will provide the student the opportunity to:

  • Learn about novel diabetes medications and medical devices
  • Recruit patients that meet inclusion criteria for studies by searching medical histories
  • Contribute to abstracts and literature reviews
  • Entering data and preparing it for analysis

Skills required: No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcomes:

  • Apply skills, gain exposure to, and be provided training and learning opportunities in a real world setting
  • Utilize the coursework studied within the individual’s academic program
  • Further expand the intern’s  knowledge and skill set
  • Establish mentorship(s) and receive feedback on completed assignments

Number of hours: The number of hours per week is negotiable, although typically students stay for the length of the project (6-12 months)  

Mentoring: Clinical Research Coordinators, Clinical Research Fellows and our PI, Dr. Osama Hamdy, will be mentoring the undergraduates. We have weekly zoom meetings.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position.

Application information: If interested, please email your resume to Hannah.gardner@joslin.harvard.edu and Shilton.dhaver@joslin.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Surgical Localization and Mapping Lab, BWH

Contact information: Haoyin Zhou and Jayender Jagadeesan, Radiology department, email: zhouhaoyin@bwh.harvard.edujayender@bwh.harvard.edu, 75 Francis Street, Boston MA 02115

Project description and duties: The project involves the development of a novel machine learning algorithm to estimate depth information from stereo laparoscopy videos, which can be further applied to surgical navigation systems. The candidate will be responsible for the design and development of the algorithms.

Skills required: Engineering students with a strong background in computer science and artificial intelligence are encouraged to apply. Students needs to be familiar with Python programming and PyTorch. Prior experience in C++ programming will be advantageous but not necessary.

Learning outcomes: This position provides an excellent opportunity to be involved in cutting-edge research in surgical navigation, and offers a stimulating environment to work closely with engineers, computer scientists, radiologists and surgeons. The position also offers the opportunity of observing surgical procedures in our state-of-the-art operating room using intraoperative imaging. The candidate will also gain valuable written and oral communication skills, and the possibility for co-authorship on publications.

Number of hours: The candidate is expected to work 8 hours a day for 4 months during the period of internship. The working hours are negotiable.

Mentoring: Dr. Zhou and Dr. Jagadeesan will be mentoring the undergraduate. Dr. Jagadeesan conducts daily stand-up for a few minutes with the entire team to discuss any outstanding issues and future research directions.

Student stipend: The position is a volunteer position. However, a stipend could be offered.  

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Zhou at zhouhaoyin@bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in the Aizenberg Biomineralization and Biomimetics Lab

Contact information: Prof.Joanna Aizenberg, jaiz@seas.harvard.edu, aizenberglab.seas.harvard.edu

Background

The Aizenberg Group at Harvard University is known to apply or adapt phenomena found in Nature to industrial or medical needs, and conduct a high-risk, fundamental research and science-driven technology development. One of the major foci of the group is to translate the technologies developed by its group members into commercial products and therapies through collaborations with internal and external researchers, as well as industry partners.

Job Description

The Aizenberg Lab at Harvard University seeks a hard-working, creative, and motivated individual to work as a member of a team developing novel biomaterial design for medical implants. Working under the supervision of research staff, this position will allow you to explore various aspects of translational medicine research, e. g. in the field of glaucoma and hydrocephalus shunts and other conduit-like implants for drainage and drug delivery. Research will include understanding the landscape of state-of-the-art devices and their limitations. We are looking for a student who is eager to assist our team with ongoing development and evaluations of medical implants.

Skills required

  • Interest in Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Physics, or related field, as well as in medical device design, laboratory testing of medical devices is desired but not required.
  • Ability to work in a small team as well as leading tasks individually

Learning outcomes:

  • Review and analysis of scientific and medical publications,
  • Experimental study design, data analysis and reporting
  • Preparing scientific presentations

Number of hours:  Negotiable.

Mentoring: Mentoring will be managed by Haritosh Patel and Dr. Ida Pavlichenko.

Student stipend: NA

Application information: Email your resume to Prof. Joanna Aizenberg jaiz@seas.harvard.edu (please cc Dr. Ida Pavlichenko ida@seas.harvard.edu)

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Surgical Localization and Mapping Lab, BWH

Contact information: Jayender Jagadeesan and Radiology department, email: jayender@bwh.harvard.edu, 75 Francis Street, Boston MA 02115

Project description and duties: The project involves the development of a novel modular robotic manipulator to treat kidney stones. The candidate will be responsible for the design and development of the robotic device and associated control algorithms.

Skills required: Engineering students with a strong background in mechanical, computer or electrical engineering are encouraged to apply. Prior experience in mechanical design, control systems will be advantageous but not necessary. 

Learning outcomes: This position provides an excellent opportunity to be involved in cutting-edge research in medical robotics and surgical navigation, and offers a stimulating environment to work closely with engineers, computer scientists, radiologists and surgeons. The position also offers the opportunity of observing surgical procedures in our state-of-the-art operating room using intraoperative imaging. The candidate will also gain valuable written and oral communication skills, and the possibility for co-authorship on publications. 

Number of hours: The candidate is expected to work 8 hours a day for 4 months during the period of internship. The working hours are negotiable. 

Mentoring: Dr. Jagadeesan will be mentoring the undergraduate. Dr. Jagadeesan conducts daily stand-up for a few minutes with the entire team to discuss any outstanding issues and future research directions.

Student stipend: The position is a volunteer position. However, a stipend could be offered.  

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Jagadeesan at jayender@bwh.harvard.edu

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Marcia Goldberg, MGH

Contact information: Marcia B. Goldberg, Infectious Disease Division, Departments of Medicine and Microbiology, marcia.goldberg@mgh.harvard.edu, Harvard Institutes of Medicine building, 4 Blackfan Circle, Room 847, Boston, MA, goldberglab.med.harvard.edu or https://www.massgeneral.org/medicine/infectious-diseases/research-and-in...

Project description and duties: Mix of molecular biology, cell biology, microbiology, and immunology.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcomes: Students will learn study design, a variety of experimental approaches, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Negotiable.

Mentoring: Direct mentoring by postdoctoral fellow; weekly meetings to discuss research progress and research directions with PI; encouraged to attend research group Zoom meetings.

Student stipend: Position is a paid position.

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Goldberg at marcia.goldberg@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity: In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Perfusion Imaging of Brain Tumors - Dr. Eva-Maria Ratai Lab, MGH

Contact information:  Eva-Maria Ratai, PhD
Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital,
A. A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging  Building 149, 13th Street, Room 230, Charlestown, MA 02129
Phone: (617) 726-1744 Email: eratai@mgh.harvard.edu
lab website https://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/lab/ratailab

Project description and duties:

We are looking for Harvard undergraduate students in Life Sciences who are interested in conducting research related to Neuroimaging.

Glioblastomas (GBM) are challenging cancers to treat, and positive clinical outcome in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme continues to be low.  One of the most informative imaging tools to monitor treatment response or treatment failure in brain tumors such as GBM is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).  MRI is a non-invasive technique primarily used in medical settings to produce high quality images of the inside of the human body. In addition, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a promising imaging technique that enables investigators to determine the presence and amount of specific metabolites. Thus, MRS provides information about the metabolic activity of tumors, and may give physicians critical insight into tumor activity. Ref: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3688017 and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29902200

Skills required:

No prior research experience is required 

Learning outcomes:  This work will provide the candidate with research experience in neuroimaging. Mentees will learn, study design, data analysis methods (including MATLAB, R, LCModel, FSL, NordicIce, 3D-Slicer., JMP etc.), presentations, and scientific writing. The work may lead to a conference abstract and papers and will aid in her/his future career as neuroscientist or physician.

Number of hours:  Negotiable

Mentoring:  The student will work under direct supervision of Dr. Eva-Maria Ratai who holds the title of Clinical Spectroscopist at MGH for >17 years. Furthermore, the candidate will work with MGH radiologists and neurologists on this project. The candidate will attend biweekly zoom group meetings

Student stipend:  This is a volunteer position. However, Harvard College Research Program (HCRP) https://uraf.harvard.edu/hcrp-application-instructions  and PRISE https://uraf.harvard.edu/summer-residential-research-programs research fellowships will continue to sponsor student stipends during the summer of 2021.

Application information:  Please email resume to Dr. Ratai  eratai@mgh.harvard.edu

 

Remote Undergraduate Medical Education Research Opportunity, Dr. Miya Bernson-Leung, BCH

Contact information: Miya Bernson-Leung, MD, EdM, Department of Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital

Project description and duties: Although pediatric neurological disorders are common, especially in children with complex health care needs, the training of general pediatricians and other non-neurologists provides limited exposure to pediatric neurology. One of my projects to address this need focuses on the teaching of the pediatric neurological examination to residents in general pediatrics through an observed examination experience.

I have developed a structured observation form to support this, but would welcome a student to take the lead on the next steps in validating the form. This would involve editing a collection of video recordings of sample neurological examinations, coordinating a group of neurologists to rate the recorded examinations using the form, and collecting their responses and assessing the form’s effectiveness for this purpose. Depending on interest and availability the student could also be involved in assessing the overall impact of this observed examination program, and in writing it up for publication in the medical education literature.

Skills required: No prior research experience required. Experience with basic video editing and data collection and management (e.g. survey creation tools such as Qualtrics or SurveyMonkey, spreadsheets) preferred, or willingness to learn. Some statistical knowledge helpful but not essential. Good organizational and communication skills.

Learning outcomes:

Broadly applicable research skills such as understanding how to collect meaningful data about the outcomes of interventions through validated instruments, presentation and writing skills, and data and project management. Familiarity with fundamentals of general education and medical education research and scholarship, with deeper exposure to this literature if manuscript preparation is of interest.

Number of hours: flexible

Mentoring: Dr. Bernson-Leung will mentor the student through a combination of email exchanges and regular Zoom calls. Virtual clinical shadowing opportunities may also be possible for students interested in medical careers, as well as invitations to medical education events of interest.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position but I am happy to support students’ applications for external funding opportunities or course credit.

Application information: Please email your resume and a brief description of your interest in the project to Dr. Bernson-Leung at miya.bernson-leung@childrens.harvard.edu.

 

Feb 11, 2021

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, MGH Biostatistics Center and Harvard Medical School

Contact information: Marie-Abele Bind, MGH Biostatistics Center, https://scholar.harvard.edu/marie-abele

Project description and duties: Development or applications of causal inference methods and software for quantifying the effects of randomized or non-randomized exposures (e.g., air pollution, temperature) on outcomes (e.g., fatal accident, crime, mortality).

Skills required: No prior research experience required. New undergraduate researchers and candidates with basic understanding of probability and statistics, and with some experience in R programming are encouraged to apply.

Learning outcomes: R programming skills, research skills such as study design for causal inference in randomized and non-randomized studies, statistical analysis methods (Fisherian, Neymanian, and Bayesian inference), presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Negotiable. Ideally, students are expected to work 5 to 10 hours a week. Length of the project: at least one semester.

Mentoring: Dr. Bind will be mentoring the undergraduate with the help of Dr. Young Lee (Post-doc). Weekly or bi-weekly mentorship meetings. Students are encouraged to attend group meetings.

Student stipend: Unpaid position. Students are encourage to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities.

Course credit: Students can conduct research for course credit.

Application information: Students should email their resume to Dr. Bind at ma.bind@mail.harvard.edu

 

Research Opportunity - Pilot Testing a Reporting System for Legal Intervention Homicides - Harvard Injury Control Research Center (David Hemenway, Co-Director), HSPH

Contact information: Catherine Barber cbarber@hsph.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: Death certificate and FBI data currently underreport deaths that occur at the hands of police and other law enforcement personnel ("legal intervention homicides"). The CDC's National Violent Death Reporting System captures these deaths well, but the system does not code important elements of these incidents, such as why the police and the subject were brought together, what the highest level of harm or threat the subject posed to police and to civilians, and what the specific precipitant was that led to the use of lethal force. The Harvard Injury Control Research Center has drafted a Legal Intervention module for the NVDRS and conducted limited pilot testing on it. A few state NVDRS offices are now interested in pilot-testing it using police and coroner/medical examiner reports. HICRC seeks a student to help coordinate this process. Specific duties include organizing project meetings, recording decisions, helping to design a common data entry interface, analyzing completion rates on specific variables, providing technical assistance on coding questions, updating the coding manual as needed, soliciting input from participating states on improvements to the module, and helping to finalize the module that will be recommended to the CDC. 

Skills requiredStrong organizational skills in coordinating a multi-site project. Some knowledge of data entry tools, like Qualtrics, and basic knowledge of data analysis software helpful, but not necessary if these are skills the student is interested learning and has some natural capability for.

Learning outcomes: Understanding of how to build and test a surveillance system to track a public health problem. Greater knowledge about police shootings and other legal intervention deaths.

Number of hours & schedule: Flexible

Mentoring: Catherine Barber will supervise the student; student will also attend Zoom meetings of the participating state Violent Death Reporting System offices and can opt to attend relevant meetings of the Harvard Injury Control Research Center. 

Student stipend: No funds available.

Application informationPlease email your resume or CV to cbarber@hsph.harvard.edu

 

 

Feb 10, 2021

Lee Kum Sheung Center for Health and Happiness Summer Internship Program, HSPH

Contact information: Lee Kum Sheung Center for Health and Happiness, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, centerhealthhappiness@hsph.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: The Lee Kum Sheung Center for Health and Happiness Summer Internship Program offers training and support to a future generation of scholars interested in studying (1) the linkages between mental well-being and physical health outcomes, and (2) the translation of science related to these linkages to inform policy and practice. Examples of past projects include:

  • A meta-analysis on mindfulness interventions and subsequent physical activity level
  • Data cleaning, entry, and extraction for a resilience intervention study
  • A literature review on psychosocial factors to reduce physician burnout
  • Transcription of mock interviews to test a new software

Skills required: Prior research experience is helpful, but not required.

Learning outcomes: research skills such as data analysis, data cleaning/entry, data collection, and science writing

Number of hours: Up to 20 hours per week for 10 weeks. The internship runs June – August 2021. However, the dates are somewhat flexible if applicants have summer vacation plans or other commitments. Once selected, interns can work with their internship host and the Center to extend the internship beyond August 2021, but the work is not to exceed 20 hours/week for 10 weeks in total.

Mentoring: Students will be placed with Center researchers and/or Science Affiliates working on projects related to the Center’s mission. The Center will be responsible for the logistics associated with the internship, as well as mentorship and guidance to interns via bi-weekly meetings over the summer. These additional mentorship opportunities will provide interns with a sense of community, opportunities for connecting and networking, and professional development.

Student stipend: Due to the ongoing pandemic, we are not sure yet if this will be a paid or unpaid opportunity. In summer 2020, the Harvard hiring freeze prevented us from offering paid positions, so our ability to do so in summer 2021 will depend on whether or not this policy is still in place. If interns are unpaid, they must be able to receive course credit for their work. In addition, while we hope that interns will be able to work in person, they may need to work remotely, depending on Harvard guidance on travel and in-person work this summer. We appreciate your flexibility as we wait to see how things may change over the coming months.

Application information: Please visit our website for the full application.

 

 

Integrative analysis of ALS plasma metabolomics using machine learning, MIT

Position title: Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Fraenkel Lab, MIT

Contact information: Ernest Fraenkel (Professor of Biological Engineering, MIT), fraenkel@mit.edu, http://fraenkel.mit.edu

Project description and duties:

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) has been shown to involve metabolic dysregulation. Previous studies have identified metabolic signatures in ALS that may correspond with disease severity, although the molecular processes behind these metabolic differences is unclear. We aim to use data science approaches to investigate if there are differences between ALS patients and healthy controls at the biological-pathway level.

The undergraduate will be responsible for developing and applying integrative network-based algorithms on metabolomics and proteomic data from a cohort of ALS patients. This undergraduate project consists of two stages, that can be modified based on the students’ interests: 1) implementing an established network algorithm on metabolomic and proteomic data from ALS patients 2) developing their own methods based on graph-based neural networks for identifying ALS biomarkers. This project is fully computational, and can be conducted remotely.

Skills required: Experience with Python required; familiarity with introductory biology principles and/or machine learning preferred

Learning outcomes:

  • Learn algorithms for integrating metabolomic and proteomic data
  • Develop skills in machine learning models, especially in using graph neural networks for biological datasets
  • Experience presenting their research and practice in scientific writing

Number of hours students are expected to work: 10 hours/week, Spring semester (hours and duration negotiable)

Mentoring: The undergraduate will be mentored by a senior PhD student in the lab. They are required to attend weekly mentorship zoom check-ins, and are strongly encouraged to attend weekly research group zoom meetings.

Student stipend: Available

Application information: Email your resume and an unofficial transcript to Ernest Fraenkel at fraenkel@mit.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity: Computer recreation of the beginning of life, Dr. Megason Lab, HMS

Contact information: Sean Megason, Dept of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School. megason@hms.harvard.edu, www.digitalfish.org

Project description and duties:

Life begins when the single cell egg is fertilized by a sperm which triggers it to divide repeatedly until there are tens to thousands (depending on the species) of seemingly equivalent cells that then go on to adopt different identities. During this early cleavage stage, cells divide in stereotypic, but not invariant, lineages. To what extent these cell lineage patterns can be explained by mechanical/geometrical influences on cell shape and division orientation vs. molecular determinants remains an open question. In this project, we will attempt to computationally simulate cell division, cell adhesion, and cell shape from a physics (but not genetic) perspective from the 1 cell to 4000 cell stage of zebrafish embryogenesis to explore to what extent physics vs genetics controls early development. We will use Python scripts of a popular open-source, 3D computer animation package called Blender to create Pixar like movies of the first stage of life. Our goal is to simulate the first 4 hours of this movie of zebrafish development- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeHiA98yUa4

Skills required: Python programming. Some knowledge of biology, physics, and computer graphics useful.

Learning outcomes: Students will learn computational modeling of multicellular systems

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project
Working hours and duration of project are flexible

Mentoring:
Mentoring will be by Dr. Megason. Students will also have the opportunity to attend the Megason Lab group meetings and present their work at the end of the summer.

Student stipend: Volunteer

Application information:

Please email a statement of interest and your CV to megason@hms.harvard.edu

 

Measuring fundamental planet parameters of a multi-planet system discovered by NASA’s TESS mission

Contact information:

Dr. Ryan Cloutier

Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian (CfA)

60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA, 02138

ryan.cloutier@cfa.harvard.edu

https://exoplanets.cfa.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

NASAs TESS mission has discovered a pair of planet candidates orbiting a nearby low mass star. These planet candidates have unique sizes and orbital separations indicating that their bulk compositions are likely distinct as well. The goals of this project are to measure the physical and orbital properties of these planets and to use those results to inform our understanding of how these types of planetary systems form. We are seeking an undergraduate student with an interest in exoplanets and in data analysis to analyze the available data that we have procured of this system in order to measure the planets’ fundamental parameters.

Skills required:

The successful applicant will have a basic working knowledge of computer programming. Experience with python or other similar scripting languages is an asset.

Learning outcomes:

The goal is to gain practical experience with observational research in astronomy. Skill development will include data analysis via computer programming, problem-solving, and science communication via writing and presentations.

Number of hours:

Students are expected to work full time throughout the project duration. Depending on the source of funding, the exact dates can vary but typically last 10 weeks from June to August.

Mentoring:

The successful applicant will be directly advised by the PI, Dr Ryan Cloutier. Faculty support will also be provided by Prof. David Charbonneau. If in-person work is permitted during the summer, the student will be expected to work at the CfA for the full duration of the program. If not, the research can be conducted remotely with regular Zoom meetings between the student and PI. The student will also be encouraged to attend weekly group meetings.

Student stipend:

Internal funding may be available but we encourage students to pursue external funding sources which are available through the SAO REU program and the Origins of Life Initiative, among others. Please contact the PI for more details.

Application information:

Applicants must email their application to the PI at ryan.cloutier@cfa.harvard.edu. Please include a brief cover letter (1-page max) indicating your academic interests and career aspirations, along with a copy of your CV, and a copy of your undergraduate transcript.

 

 

Feb 9, 2021

Instrumentation Development for Rubin Observatory, Chile

Contact information: Christopher Stubbs, Department of Physics & Department of Astronomy, Lab is 106 McKay building. https://projects.iq.harvard.edu/stubbs/home

Project description and duties: We are seeking one or more students to help us develop a network of sensors (temperature, atmospheric pressure, vibration) that will be installed at the Rubin observatory in Chile. These devices interface over USB to a data collection machine which is part of a wireless network.

Skills required: Good competency in Python programming is a must, experience with the Linux operating system is a plus.

Learning outcomes: Students will gain experience in instrumentation, systems engineering, technical communications, and working in a team environment.

Number of hours: A minimum commitment of 5-6 hours per week is expected. We hope to have someone start this Spring term.

Mentoring: Students are welcome to attend (remote) weekly group meetings, and will hold additional meetings with group members as needed to support this work. The project will culminate in a written report and a presentation to the Rubin Observatory project team.

Student stipend: This is a paid position.

Application information: If interested, please send a cover letter and CV (including a description of programming proficiency and experience) to Christopher Stubbs at stubbs@g.harvard.edu

 

 

On-site and virtual Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Marcia Haigis Lab, HMS

Contact information: Marcia Haigis (Cell Biology Department), Marcia_Haigis@hms.harvard.edu, LHRRB 300, https://haigis.hms.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: Project is to study cancer metabolism and T cell metabolism by using biochemical methods and mass spectrometry. Duties will be conducting hands-on research such as western blotting, molecular cloning, cell culture and virtual mass spectrometry data analysis.

Skills required: Biology, Chemistry or Biochemistry background. Previous hands-on experiences preferred but not required.

Learning outcomes: research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Flexible, preferentially at least 3hr a day, 3-4 days a week. Minimum of 10 hours/week during semester. Maximum of full-time during the summer.

Mentoring: Student will be working under the mentorship of a postdoctoral fellow. Mentorship meeting will take place weekly, and in lab daily. The student will be able to participate in all lab research meetings, including weekly group meeting, weekly discussion group meeting and journal clubs.

Student stipend: Volunteer position, with opportunities to apply for summer research fellowships.

Application information: Please provide a CV with a brief description of how your education and research background may fit in with this position.

 

 

In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Prof. Vamsi Mootha’s Lab, MGH/Broad/HMS/HHMI

Contact information: Prof. Vamsi Mootha, vamsi@hms.harvard.edu, Department of Molecular Biology, 185 Cambridge Street 6th Floor Boston, MA 02114, https://mootha.med.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: The Mootha Laboratory is seeking motivated Harvard undergraduates to conduct research with a dynamic team of ~30 post-doctoral researchers, clinical fellows, graduate students and research scientists. The laboratory combines the latest tools of genomics, computation, and biochemical physiology to systematically investigate mitochondria — key organelles in our body that are crucial for energy metabolism and linked to rare diseases, neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, and aging. Our lab spans very basic biology and mechanisms to translational efforts aimed at alleviating disease. The student will work closely with a senior researcher on CRISPR screening, mammalian cell-based assay development, and in-depth studies of systems metabolism and bioenergetics. This is a rare opportunity to be a part of a dynamic and cutting-edge research team with ample opportunity for co-authorship on important publications. Ideal for undergraduates who want to gain research experience for pursuing a career as a researcher or physician.

Skills required: Students majoring in biology, molecular biology, chemistry, or biochemistry are encouraged to apply. Candidates with research experience in a laboratory are highly preferred, but this is not required. Scientific aptitude, attention to detail, excellent communication skills, and enthusiasm are a must.

Learning outcomes: Students will learn how to design and perform wet-lab experiments, how to analyze and present their data, and how to prepare figures and text for a scholarly article

Number of hours: Number of hours/week is negotiable.

Mentoring: A senior researcher will work closely with the student on a day-to-day basis. Attendance at group meetings

Student stipend: Subject to discussion, and the student is encouraged to apply for internal Harvard and outside fellowships.

Application information: Please send a CV and a cover letter to Dr. Tsz-Leung To (tto@broadinstitute.org) and Dr. Anna Kotrys (kotrys@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu) in the Mootha Lab

 

 

In-person Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cheng Lab, MGH

Contact information: Leo L. Cheng, Departments of Radiology and Pathology, Charlestown Navy Yard, MGH

Project description and duties: 1). Cellular metabolomics studies of Alzheimer’s disease with mouse models; and 2). Analysis of grain metabolomics; all with NMR spectroscopy.

Skills required: No prior research experience is expected and required, but an organic chemistry level understanding will be helpful.

Learning outcomes: As independent mini-size projects, students will learn research skills including study design, data measurements and analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing for publications.

Number of hours: Project scales will be determined according to students’ availabilities, spring, summer or even longer.

Mentoring: Students will under the PI’s direct guidance.

Student stipend: Can be considered depending on the funding situation at time.

Application information: Please contact: Leo Cheng, PhD, at 617-724-6593 or lcheng@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Research Opportunity –Eye Image Analysis by Deep Learning

Contact information:

Dr. Gang Luo

Department of Ophthalmology

Harvard Medical School

https://researchers.masseyeandear.org/details/327/gang-luo

Project description and duties:

We are developing smartphone based vision screening technologies, which have great application potentials in tele-medicine and tele-health. https://tvst.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2724671

In this particular research opportunity, we will be training a deep neural network for eye feature segmentation, such as eye lid, cornea, and pupil.

Skills required: Students are expected to understand the deep learning and have some experience with neural network training.

Learning outcomes:

Gain more experience on AI.

Number of hours

At least 20 hours per week remotely.

Mentoring:

PI and a junior faculty member will mentor the intern student. Weekly zoom meeting is planned.

Student stipend:

Volunteer position.

Application information:

Please directly contact PI at gang_luo@meei.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Research Opportunity – 3D Street Mapping for Visually Impaired

Contact information:

Dr. Gang Luo

Department of Ophthalmology

Harvard Medical School

https://researchers.masseyeandear.org/details/327/gang-luo

Project description and duties:

High definition maps used by autonomous vehicles are 3D maps of the environment. It can help self-driving cars to precisely determine locations and orientations with accuracy much better than GPS. Similarly, the map can also help to localize the position of pedestrians with body mounted camera. Potential applications include assisted navigation for visually impaired

In this particular research opportunity, we will create high definition point cloud map for a quarter-mile street segment. The map will be used in our mobility studies involved with visually impaired people.

Skills required: Students should have some basic coding skills (Python, Java, or Matlab).

Learning outcomes:

Gain some computer vision knowledge.

Number of hours

At least 20 hours per week remotely.

Mentoring:

PI and a junior faculty member will mentor the intern student. Weekly zoom meeting is planned.

Student stipend:

Volunteer position.

Application information:

Please directly contact PI at gang_luo@meei.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Summer Research Project, The Massachusetts Host-Microbiome Center

Massachusetts Host-Microbiome Center

Brigham & Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School

http://www.host-microbiome.org/

Position: summer, full time

Posting date: Feb 8th, 2021

Start date: May-June 2021

Undegraduate Summer Research Project: The Massachusetts Host-Microbiome Center supports basicscience,

pre-clinical and human studies defining how the microbiota affects health and human disease. The

summer position will evaluate transposon libraries in commensal species of gut anaerobes for use in in vivo

mouse studies. Candidates will have an opportunity to learn cutting-edge techniques in anaerobic microbiology,

bacterial genetics, high-throughput ‘omic analyses and gnotobiotic colonization models.

Successful candidates must have good organizational, quantitative, and communication skills and

capacity to work effectively within a team environment. The position offers the opportunity to further develop

skills in anaerobic microbiology, host-microbiome systems, experimental design, and taking findings forward to

publication.

To apply, please submit the following to Dr. Lynn Bry, lbry @ bwh.harvard.edu:

1. A cover letter responsive to this posting describing your education, including any labs or prior research

relevant to the position, and long-term career goals

2. Curriculum Vitae (CV)

3. Undergraduate transcript

4. Recent graduates must have taken chemistry, organic chemistry, calculus, and either microbiology, genetics

or biochemistry, and maintained at least a 3.2 GPA in your major courses

Brigham and Women’s Hospital is an Equal Opportunity Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment

without regard to race, sex, color, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, protected veteran status, or on the basis of disability.

 

 

Technical Undergraduate Research Assistant, Dr. Martha Bulyk Laboratory, BWH

There is a technical research assistant position available in the laboratory of Prof. Martha Bulyk for a highly motivated individual with prior on-the-job experience in a molecular biology research lab. The lab is in the Division of Genetics at Brigham & Women’s Hospital, part of the Harvard Medical School research community located at the Longwood Medical Area in Boston, MA. This position will focus on studies of protein-DNA interactions and DNA regulatory elements primarily by in vitro and potentially by in vivo approaches, focusing on human. These data will aid in understanding mechanisms of transcriptional gene regulation and the impact of genetic variation and splicing on gene expression and phenotypes, including breast cancer and other diseases.

Required skills include: preparation of solutions and media, growth of bacterial cultures, DNA minipreps, preparation of DNA samples for Sanger sequencing and analysis of sequencing results, transformation of bacterial cells, preparation of E. coli glycerol stocks, restriction enzyme based or Gateway recombinational DNA cloning, PCR, DNA and protein gel electrophoresis, Coomassie staining of protein gels, Western blots. Prior experience with the following techniques would be helpful: expression and purification of recombinant proteins, protein biochemistry, protein-DNA binding assays, preparation of Illumina sequencing libraries, DNA or protein sequence analysis, and mammalian cell culture.  Other duties will include maintaining equipment and supplies.

This position provides an excellent opportunity to be involved in cutting-edge research in transcriptional regulation and genomics, and offers a stimulating, academic environment, and the opportunity to work in a team setting involving experimental and computational scientists. This position also offers the opportunity to gain valuable written and oral communication skills, and the possibility for co-authorship on publications and future supervisory roles. This position is ideal for a candidate graduating this year or a recent college graduate seeking to gain additional laboratory research experience.

A recent Bachelor of Science degree in a biological science or related field is required.  Applicants with a Bachelor’s degree in another area of concentration may be considered if the applicant has had significant coursework in the sciences, has the required prior laboratory work experience, and demonstrates strong potential. Applicant must have basic Linux proficiency and some computer programming experience. A flexible work schedule is required. Fluent command of spoken and written English is absolutely required.

To apply for this position, please submit a science resume to Dr. Bulyk mlbulyk@genetics.med.harvard.edu.

 

 

Feb 5, 2021

In-person/Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Liron Bar-Peled, MGH/HMS

Contact Information: Dr. Liron Bar-Peled, lbar-peled@mgh.harvard.edu; 149 13th St. Charlestown, MA 02141; MGH Cancer Center; barpeledlab.org

Project description and duties: Dr. Bar-Peled seeks exceptionally motivated candidates who enjoy conducting research and involving themselves in the dynamic and intellectual environment of the laboratory. The laboratory studies the cellular response to altered metabolic states in multiple cancer models. Specific studies relate to discovering druggable vulnerabilities in genetically defined cancers and elucidating the mechanisms of reactive oxygen species in cancer growth using cutting edge chemical proteomic technologies. To learn more about our research visit: barpeledlab.org.  She or he will have the opportunity to become fully involved with all the steps of research being completed in our laboratory, often working directly with Dr. Bar-Peled, which will lead to numerous publications. Investigators in our laboratory will present at regular laboratory meetings. The experience gained in the lab will be very helpful for pursuing a career as a researcher or physician.

 

Skills required: The ideal candidate will be detail-oriented, organized, and able to work independently as well as part of a team in a fast-paced evolving environment. Excellent communication and organizational skills are necessary. Students majoring in biology, molecular biology, chemistry, or biochemistry are encouraged to apply. Candidates with a strong computational backgrounds are also encouraged to apply. Candidates with research experience in a laboratory are highly preferred, but this is not required.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Performs base-level procedures as assigned (i.e. – pipetting, tissue culture, in vitro assays, etc.)
  • Prepares proteomic samples
  • Conducts mammalian tissue culture experiments
  • Conducts molecular biology experiments (cloning, western blotting, gene-editing using CRISPR)
  • Maintains laboratory notebook
  • Understands and applies basic scientific techniques
  • Conducts analysis of results
  • Supports the research of other lab members
  • Preforms independent literature searches
  • Assists with organizing materials for publication or presentation
  • Works in an efficient manner
  • Has a high capacity for problem solving

Number of hours: 14-20 week. 2 Semester minimum requirement.

Mentoring: Dr. Bar-Peled or a highly trained member of his Team.

Student Stipend: Subject to discussion

Application information: Send a cover letter and your CV to Liron at lbar-peled@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

Feb 1, 2021

Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering research opportunity at the Rowland Institute (semester and summer)

Contact information:Dr. Shabnam Raayai (sraayai@fas.harvard.edu), Rowland Institute at Harvard University, https://raayailab.rowland.harvard.edu/ 

Project description and duties:Raayai Lab is focused on the study of fluid and solid mechanics and the interaction of flow with rigid and soft surfaces. Inspired by ordered textures and geometries seen in nature, such as ribs on shark scales, posts on Lotus leaves, or ridges on rice leaves, our group is interested in investigating the effect of textures on the flow around them using experimental and numerical techniques to identify the advantages and disadvantages of employing textures in engineering applications.

We are looking to recruit an undergraduate researcher to help with different parts of the project including fabrication, experimental and/or numerical aspects of the investigation. 

Skills required:Knowledge of basic concepts in mechanics and CAD modeling;Basic knowledge of programming and proficiency with Python or C++. 

Learning outcomes: During this project, the student will:

  • • learn to design and fabricate textured surfaces 
  • • learn how to conduct literature review related to our research work 
  • • analyze results with respect to the parameters of interest

Number of hours:Students are expected to commit 10 hours/week during the semester and full time (35 hours/week) during the summer period. 

Mentoring: Dr. Raayai will supervise the project directly and will be the mentor. There will be regular meetings to discuss the research and progress. The student will be able to attend lab meetings, and will have an opportunity to present their work.

Student stipend: This position pays $15/hour.

Application information:Please send a CV and a cover letter expressing interestto sraayai@fas.harvard.edu.

 

Jan 14, 2021

Undergraduate neuroscience research opportunity at the Rowland Institute (semester and summer)

Contact information: Dr. Sasha Rayshubskiy (srayshubskiy@rowland.harvard.edu), Rowland Institute at Harvard University, www.rayshubskiylab.org

Project description and duties: Our lab is interested in neural architectures that define persistent states in animal behavior. For example, how does the brain configure the motor control system to coordinate movements during the persistent state of cooking and how is it configured differently when we’re in a persistent state of playing basketball? We address these questions in the fruit fly – Drosophila melanogaster – because the electron microscopy level circuit diagram of many neural circuits in the fly’s brain has recently become available to the public. As a result, these anatomically-based circuit diagrams are generating hypothesis about circuit function at an unprecedented rate.

We are looking to recruit an undergraduate researcher to help work with this anatomical data to help us understand the function of these circuits.

To learn more, see the research section of our lab’s website in the link above.

Skills required: Basic knowledge of programming. Knowledge of basic concepts in neuroscience and proficiency with Python or R is desired.

Learning outcomes: At the end of the training, the student will:

  • learn to analyze detailed descriptions of neural anatomical data
  • build neural circuits from anatomical data and devise models of their potential function
  • learn how to interpret results of scientific papers related to our research work

Based on their contributions, students will be co-authors on scientific manuscripts.

Number of hours: Students are expected to commit 10 hours/week during the semester and full time (35 hours/week) during the summer period.

 

Mentoring: Sasha Rayshubskiy will be a direct supervisor and mentor of the student. We will meet at least weekly and as much as needed to discuss work and progress. The student will also work with postdoctoral fellows in the laboratory and will be able to attend lab meetings and journal clubs, where they will have an opportunity to present.

 

Student stipend: This position pays $15/hour.

 

Application information:

Please send a CV and a cover letter expressing interest, goals and anticipated availability to Sasha Rayshubskiy (srayshubskiy@rowland.harvard.edu).

 

 

Jan 5, 2021

Undergraduate Research: MGHfC Digestive Diseases

Contact information:

Bryan P. Hurley, Ph.D.

Director of the MGHfC Digestive Disease Summer Research Program

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School

Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center

Massachusetts General Hospital

https://www.massgeneral.org/children/mucosal-immunology/education-training/digestive-disease-summer-research-program

Project description and duties:

The MGHfC Digestive Disease Summer Research Program offers short-term NIH support as part of an integrated research educational experience that matches 10-12 student participants with research mentors to perform independent research focused on digestive diseases over a 10-week period during the summer. In addition to presenting their research at a summer’s end symposium, students will also participate in a peer-driven presentation-based biomedical course and a panel discussion on biomedical careers. Currently 25 MGH Principal Investigators with interest in digestive diseases serve as mentors spanning a wide range of topics and technical training. Research topics include obesity, food allergy, microbial pathogenesis, gut-brain axis, probiotics, intestinal development and maintenance, cystic fibrosis, celiac disease, inflammation, intestinal parasites, and adaptive immunity. Techniques applied to research projects include, advanced imaging, microfluidics, molecular biology, computational biology, stem cell biology, immune cell isolation, in vivo modeling, and patient-based clinical research. The MGHfC Digestive Disease Summer Research Program provides an excellent opportunity for science, math, and engineering students interested in conducting biomedical research in an academic hospital setting.  

Skills required: Are students expected to have any particular laboratory skills, if so which ones? If no prior research experience is required, state so to encourage applications from new undergraduate researchers.

No previous experience required

Learning outcomes: research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Students will learn research methodology that includes study design and data analysis, as well as concepts in immunology, stem cell biology, and infectious disease, among other topics in biomedical research.  Students will also develop scientific presentation and career networking skills  

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if these are negotiable, state so. Some students may choose to take summer courses, so perhaps flexibility in this area will result in more students applying)

During a 10-week period that runs from early June to mid-August, students are expected to work fulltime (40 hours/week)

Mentoring: who will be mentoring the undergraduate, how often are mentorship zoom meetings,  and can the student attend research group zoom meetings?

Each student participating in the MGHfC Digestive Disease Summer Research program will be matched with one of our 25 faculty mentors based on availability and the student’s research interests.

https://www.massgeneral.org/children/mucosal-immunology/education-training/participating-faculty

Student stipend: Can the research group pay a stipend to the student? State if the position is a paid position or a volunteer position.

For students accepted to participate in the MGHfC Digestive Disease Summer Research Program, a stipend will be provided for the duration of the 10-week program through an NIH educational grant awarded to MGH

Application information:

https://www.massgeneral.org/children/mucosal-immunology/education-training/apply-to-the-mghfc-digestive-disease-summer-research-program

 

 

Dec 18, 2020

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Rashidian, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/HMS

Contact information: Mohammad Rashidian, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Cancer Immunology and Virology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Assistant Professor of Radiology, Harvard Medical School

Project description and duties: Development of precision therapeutics to tackle challenges in cancer immunology and autoimmune disease

Immunotherapy has revolutionized cancer treatment, however, a significant fraction of patients fail to respond to therapy and may suffer serious side effects. Our lab studies cancer immunology using expertise in chemical biology, molecular biology, and immunology. We are focused on understanding the underlying mechanisms of how the tumor microenvironment is shaped and continuously changed in response to cancer immunotherapies. We aim to develop new and improved diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic tools to detect, diagnose, characterize, treat, and prevent cancer.

Our research aims are fivefold: (1) to develop methods for non-invasive monitoring of immune responses; (2) to investigate changes in the tumor microenvironment (TME) in response to treatment; (3) to explore how to reshape the TME to a more pronounced anti-tumor status and develop tools to realize this possibility; and (4) to develop precision therapeutics for cancer. In the long term, our goals are to help better understand the dynamics of immune responses, and to investigate what is behind the heterogeneous response to cancer immunotherapy. These are essential for developing more effective therapies, more effective methods for early detection of cancer, and new prognostic modalities.

Skills required: students with basic biology lab skillsets are encouraged to apply, however, no prior research experience is required. Students will have the opportunity to work with senior scientists in the lab to be trained for lab techniques.

Learning outcomes: research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing, as well as lab skillsets such as cell culture, protein engineering, protein expression and purification, ELISA analysis, running SDS-PAGE and western blot analyses, protein labeling, and working with instruments such as FPLC, microscopy and flow cytometry.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: 10 h per week for spring semseter, and at least 30 h per week for the summer.

Mentoring: senior graduate students and postdocs in the lab will be mentoring students. The PI will have regular weekly meetings with students as well.

Student stipend: positions are volunteer positions, however the PI will work with students to apply for Harvard fellowship programs (HCRP, PRISE, etc.).

Application information: motivated students should contact Dr. Rashidian at mohammad_rashidian@dfci.harvard.edu

 

 

Dec 17, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational and Systems Biology at Zomorrodi Lab (MGH/HMS)

 

Contact information:

Ali R. Zomorrodi 

Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center

Massachusetts General Hospital for Children

44 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114

E-mail: azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu

Zomorrodi lab website

 

Project description and duties: 

Zomorrodi lab integrates biological networks, mathematical/statistical/physical models and engineering tools to develop computational mechanistic models of the microbiome and the host. These models are used to advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and to streamline the design of personalized treatments.

 

We are recruiting an undergraduate researcher to work on a project concerned with the construction of computational models of host-microbiota interactions in colorectal cancer by using genome-scale metabolic networks. This project can be entirely performed remotely. 

 

Skills required:

Having a keen interest in computational research is the only requirement and 

no mathematical or programming skills are needed. For students who are particularly interested in computational modeling or computer programming there are ample opportunities to tailor the project toward their interests. 

 

Learning outcomes

Students will learn how computational simulations and biological network models can be used to address translational problems. More broadly, students gain experience in essential research skills including data analysis, interpretation of results, presentations, and scientific writing.

 

Time commitment:

Negotiable. The PI is flexible to accommodate students’ schedules or other time demands although students who plan to stay in the lab for longer time periods (six months or so) are preferred. This project is intended for the duration of the Spring semester and summer and can be extended into Fall and beyond upon mutual interest. 

 

Mentoring: 

Students will be directly mentored by Dr. Zomorrodi and have the opportunity to remotely interact with other lab members and attend group meetings. Mentorship zoom meetings are held once a week on a regular basis.  

 

Student stipend: 

This is a volunteer research position. Students are encouraged to apply for undergraduate research fellowships such as HCRP or to register for a research course credit. 

 

Application information

Interested candidates should email a CV to Dr. Zomorrodi at azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu and briefly explain what their interests are. Please use “2021 Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunities” as the subject of your email.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Position, Dr. Weng Lab, University of Massachusetts Medical School

Zhiping Weng, Ph.D.

Li Weibo Chair in Biomedical Research

Director, Program in Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology 

Professor, Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology

University of Massachusetts Medical School

About the Project

Since the introduction of genome-wide association studies in the mid-2000s, great strides have been made in the understanding of the genetics of human disease. However, while the monogenic origins of Mendelian diseases can often be pinpointed, the multigenic factors contributing to complex diseases remain elusive. Recent findings suggest that the majority of complex disease heritability is explained by rare variants and the summative effect of many low-effect-size common variants; thus, collections of related but distinct variants likely have joint effects on molecular phenotypes such as gene expression or biochemical pathway activity, which in turn directly contribute to diseases. 

In this project, we aim to develop a computational framework that can integrate the wealth of publicly available whole-genome sequencing and epigenetic data to predict causal variants, genes, network modules, and pathways in complex diseases. We will apply our framework on non-syndromic cases of three prevalent human congenital defects with a significant social and economic cost: cleft lip/palate, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and ventricular septal defect. These defects all have phenotypic data available through a wealth of datasets but their genetic basis is poorly understood, offering a great opportunity for the discovery of novel biology with therapeutic potential.

About the Weng Lab and the Program in Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology at UMass Medical School

The Weng lab develops and applies computational techniques to study biological processes at the molecular level. Our research emphasizes statistical and machine learning techniques; we apply these techniques to various types of genomics, epigenomics, and transcriptomics data, at the tissue and single-cell levels, in normal and disease samples. More information at https://umassmed.edu/zlab.

The Program in Bioinformatics and Integrative Biology at UMass Medical School was founded in 2008 with Dr. Weng as its founding director. Research in the program addresses cutting-edge questions in biology and medicine by developing and applying computational genomics approaches that take advantage of genomic information now available for humans and model organisms. More information can be found at https://umassmed.edu/bioinformatics.

UMass Medical School is a culturally diverse community, and we strongly encourage applications from women and minority candidates. UMass Medical School is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

Note: this is non-Harvard research lab and you will not be able to secure most Harvard Research Fellowships, or apply this towards honors thesis.

 

Nov 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Drs. Sepucha and Valentine, Health Decision Sciences Center, MGH

Contact information: KD Valentine, Department of General Internal Medicine, kvalentine2@mgh.hrvard.edu, lab website: https://mghdecisionsciences.org/

Project description and duties: Please see attached proposal

Skills required: Prior research experience is required

Learning outcomes: Research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, patient engagement

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: We can work with the student and their schedule to decide on the number of hours per week.

Mentoring: Karen Sepucha, PhD and KD Valentine, PhD will be overseeing the student intern, attendance in Zoom team meetings will be encouraged.

Student stipend: This is a non-paid internship

Application information: A cover letter and resume are required, please contact Dr. KD Valentine, at kvalentine2@mgh.hrvard.edu with questions and materials.

The Center has several ongoing studies:

  • Promoting Informed Decisions about Cancer Screening in Older Adults (PRIMED Study). This multi-site randomized trial is examining the impact of a skills training course for primary care physicians on conversations with older adults considering whether to continue or stop colorectal cancer screening.
  • PRIMED-COVID Study. This extension of the PRIMED study explores the reactions of patients who have had their colonoscopies rescheduled or delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic and is evaluating an intervention to help patients navigate their options for colon cancer screening during the pandemic.
  • Implementation of patient decision aids for elective orthopedic surgery decisions. This implementation science project is a collaboration across Orthopedic Departments at hospitals affiliated with MassGeneralBrigham as well as others across the US. We aim to improve the quality of elective surgery decisions by implementing patient decision aids into routine orthopedic care for four conditions: hip and knee osteoarthritis, lumbar herniated disc and spinal stenosis.
  • Impact of cognitive function on shared decision making. This project is a collaboration with the Weiner Center for Preoperative Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. We are surveying older adults (65+) who have scheduled surgery to assess their knowledge about the procedure, amount of shared decision making, and level of cognitive function. The data will be used to refine a clinical survey instrument that measures shared decision making.
  • Aortic valve replacement decisions. This project is a collaboration with the cardiology department and aims to identify if a decision aid for patients with AS can improve patient’s decision quality.

Student activities may include:

  • Literature review
  • Key informant interviews and/or focus groups with patients, caregivers, and clinicians
  • Observation of clinic visits and mapping of clinic workflow (maybe be virtual)
  • Development and testing of decision support tools (paper-based, online, video)
  • Survey research: designing questionnaires, screening patients, preparing mailings, reminder phone calls, data entry, medical chart review
  • Data analysis: qualitative analyses of interviews and focus groups, basic and advanced quantitative data analytics, and data visualization
  • Use of Microsoft Office Suite, Redcap, Access, R, SPSS
  • Manuscript contributions (writing, editing, proofing, references)
  • Local conference poster presentations
  • Grant proposal contributions

Interested?  Send the following to KD Valentine via email (kvalentine2@mgh.harvard.edu)

  • 1 page (maximum) statement describing your research interests and goals and how this experience might help with your development
  • Your CV or Resume

To learn more about The Health Decision Sciences Center, visit our website:

https://mghdecisionsciences.org/

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cognitive Neuroscience Group (CNG), MGH Institute of Health Professions

Contact information: Lauryn Zipse, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, lzipse@mghihp.edu, 617-643-3245

Project description and duties: The research intern will assist with development of an app-based assessment of cognitive and language function to track recovery after stroke.

Skills required: Programming experience required, preferably but not necessarily using Xcode.

Learning outcomes: The research intern will work with an interdisciplinary team based at MGH to learn about stroke recovery, evaluation of language and cognition, and tele-assessment.

Number of hours expected: The number of hours per week and duration of involvement are negotiable.

Mentoring: Dr. Lauryn Zipse will be the primary mentor. The research intern will have the opportunity to participate in team meetings, via Zoom, with an interdisciplinary team of medical professionals and researchers.

Student stipend: This is currently a volunteer position.

Application information: Email your resume and a cover letter/email to Dr. Lauryn Zipse at lzipse@mghihp.edu

 

Sep 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Sang Park, BCH

Contact information:   PI name: Sang Park, Department: Pediatrics, Location: 3 Blackfan Circle, Boston, MA 02115 

Contact information: sangwon.park@childrens.harvard.edu    Lab website: parklab.info

Project description and duties:

Skills required: Power point, Excel, and Adobe Illustrator.

Learning outcomes: Students will learn how to analyze western blot and qPCR data, how to present their data, and how to write a scientific journal/grant.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if these are negotiable, state so. Some students may choose to take summer courses, so perhaps flexibility in this area will result in more students applying): A minimum of one-year commitment would be good, but it is negotiable. 

Mentoring: PI and other lab members will be mentoring. PI will be providing mentorship through zoom meetings on a weekly- or bi-weekly basis. Other lab members will be providing mentorship as needed (most likely, more frequently than once a week). Students can attend research group zoom meetings. 

Student stipend: The position will be paid $15/hour. 

Application information: Detail the information students need to submit and the contact information for submitting this information: Email your resume to Dr. Park at sangwon.park@childrens.harvard.edu​ 

 

 

Sep 16, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Thoracic Surgery Research at Dr. Yang’s lab, MGH/HMS

Contact information: Dr. Chi-Fu Jeffrey Yang, Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital.  cjyang@mgh.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: Our program is an opportunity to work with physicians and medical students on cutting-edge clinical surgical research.  In addition, we will teach students how to raise awareness about lung cancer screening in the community.  Our program is meant to be more than an assistantship: this is a unique opportunity to work directly alongside talented physicians and researchers in the field.  We want to develop your research and leadership skills and allow you the opportunity to create and lead innovation that may potentially improve the lives of patients.

Responsibilities include:

• Learning how to perform clinical research in thoracic oncology with physicians and medical students 

• Collaborating with team members to raise awareness about lung cancer screening

• Programs development

 Skills required:

• Proficiency with Microsoft Word, Excel, and Outlook. Familiarity with statistical programs such as R or STATA are a plus but not required.  Video-editing and familiarity with web design are a plus, but not required

• Commitment to research and public service

• Previous leadership experience and demonstrated individual initiative are key criteria that will be considered when reviewing applicants for this position

Learning outcomes: By the end of their training, the trainee should be able to:

1.         Learn how to perform cutting-edge clinical research in thoracic surgery

2.         Read papers in any major medical journal and understand the strengths and weaknesses of the study

3.         Be fluent in medical vocabulary and understand the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer

4.         Learn how to effectively engage with the public to raise awareness about lung cancer

5.         If warranted based on their contributions, students will be co-authors on scientific manuscripts.

 

Number of hours: The project will require at least 8-10 hours/week of commitment.  At the same time, we recognize that students have many commitments, including studying for finals and spending time with family and friends, and we will work around the student’s schedule to make this a fun and engaging learning experience.

 

Mentoring: Dr. Yang is a thoracic surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital.  He graduated from Harvard College and Harvard Medical School.  He lived in Matthews as a first-year and then Leverett House.  He has over 7 years of experience teaching and mentoring undergraduate students, many of whom are now in medical school.  He has built a team that cares deeply about the undergraduate research experience and really wants to help students achieve their dreams. 

These are his publications: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/chi-fu.yang.1/bibliography/public/

Student stipend: Volunteer position. The Laboratory does not have funds to pay student stipends, but students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships (https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities)

 

Application information: Please e-mail your resume/CV along with a cover letter including a brief outline of your interests, goals, and anticipated time availability

to Dr. Chi-Fu Jeffrey Yang at cjyang@mgh.harvard.edu

 

Sep 3, 2020

Research Assistant, Demehri Laboratory, Center for Cancer Immunology, Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School

Full time research assistant position is available immediately in our laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School to study the mechanisms of immune regulation of early cancer development and the role alarmins and commensal viruses in this process. The position is ideal for a recent graduate planning to work for couple of years in research before entering graduate or medical school. Besides bench research, applicant will have the opportunity to learn about clinical care for patients with severe skin cancers and skin-related adverse effects of cancer immunotherapies. Attention to detail, high motivation, and effective communication skills are essential. Knowledge in immunological, molecular, and mice experimentations are considered important for this position.

Visit our laboratory website for more detail:

http://massgeneral.link/DemeheriLab

Please email a cover letter and CV to Dr. Shawn Demehri:

sdemehri1@mgh.harvard.edu
 

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Radiation Physics and Instrumentation Lab, MGH

Contact information:   PI: Hamid Sabet, Ass. Prof. HSabet@mgh.harvard.edu

Additional contact: Lisa Bläckberg, Instructor. LBlackberg@mgh.harvard.edu

Radiation Physics and Instrumentation Laboratory, Gordon Center for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, MGH.

Lab website: https://scholar.harvard.edu/sabet

 

Project description and duties:

In our imaging instrumentation lab, we focus on developing high-performance and advanced radiation based medical imaging systems. This is done by rigorously studying and addressing some of the fundamental limitations and obstacles of today’s imaging systems.

We have several ongoing projects including the development of a high performance Cardiac dedicated Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) system, development of a Brain dedicated Position Emission Tomography System as well as an intraoperative probe-based imaging system.

In all these areas we are combining innovation on the system level design with developments of individual radiation detectors to meet the requirements of a given application.

In addition to the mentioned projects we are continuously exploring new ideas in order to address current shortcomings and limitations in the field.

While a large portion of our work is experimental in nature, there are also several areas of our research that can be done remotely. We perform a number of different types of simulation studies for system and detector optimization, as well as GPU programming and machine learning. Additional work currently done remotely are image reconstruction and supporting tasks such as mechanical drawings.

The specific tasks of a remote undergraduate student would largely depend on the interest and skills of the student and could involve for example programming tasks, data analysis, mechanical drawings, simulations, experimental design and documentation.

Skills required:

Other than logical thinking and enthusiasm, no other skill is required! Computer programming in MATLAB, LabVIEW, Python, etc is a plus. Students will learn all the necessary skills while participating in the work in our lab.

 

Learning outcomes:

A student in our lab would have the opportunity to learn about the medical imaging field and contribute to our research while expanding their skill set. The student would get a general knowledge of different medical imaging systems and their requirements as well as basic understanding on how radiation detection works.

Specific skills would depend on the tasks taken on by the student but could include data analysis methods, basic programming, visual presentation of scientific data and scientific writing.

 

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project:

The number of hours per week is flexible (up to 15-20 hours weekly). Project length is also flexible as project type and length can be tuned based on the student.

 

Mentoring:

The student will be mentored by current lab members. Zoom meetings will be done as often as needed, but minimally once per week. The student can also attend the weekly lab meeting held over zoom.

 

Student stipend:

This is a volunteer position

 

Application information:

If interested please send a CV to either Hamid Sabet (HSabet@mgh@harvard.edu) or Lisa Bläckberg (LBlackberg@mgh.harvard.edu)

 

Aug 31, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Computational Parasite Genomics, Neafsey Lab, Broad Institute/HSPH

Contact information: Dr. Angela Early (early@broadinstitute.org), Neafsey Lab, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, HSPH, https://sites.sph.harvard.edu/neafsey-lab/

Project description and duties: Our lab uses computational methods to study the genomes of Plasmodium parasites, the causative agents of malaria. We are particularly interested in understanding how Plasmodium genomes are evolving to increase survival in the face of drugs and host immune responses. Our ability to make these discoveries, however, relies on differentiating true biological signal from various sources of error (or “noise”). We are looking for an undergraduate to assess how model parameter choice affects the analysis outcome of several population genetic tools. You will be trained in using the tools and then run them independently on multiple data sets using different parameter sets. You will then learn the appropriate statistical tests for ascertaining whether the different input parameters significantly change the final analysis results. With this study, we aim to establish “best practices” for both our group and the larger malaria research community.

Skills required: Some programming experience and a basic knowledge of genetics (eg, AP Biology or Life Sciences 1B). This project will involve command line scripting, python, and R. Direct experience with all these languages is not necessary, but you should feel comfortable independently reading and editing code (with the help of Google, of course!)

Learning outcomes: In the first semester, you will learn to run relevant population genetics software and discuss the basics of experimental design. If continuing for a second semester, you will make and test a hypothesis, independently analyze data, and present your findings in a short oral presentation.

Number of hours: Minimum of 5 hours per week.

Mentoring: Depending on the number of hours worked, the student will meet once or twice a week with Dr. Angela Early. If desired, students can also attend weekly group meetings to learn about other research projects in the Neafsey Lab.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position, but we will support applications for HCRP stipends.

Application information: If you are interested in speaking further about the project, please email your resume to Angela Early (early@broadinstitute.org).

 

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Evolution of Drug Resistance, Neafsey Lab, Broad Institute/HSPH

Contact information: Dr. Angela Early (early@broadinstitute.org), Neafsey Lab, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, HSPH, https://sites.sph.harvard.edu/neafsey-lab/

Project description and duties: Research in the Neafsey Group aims to understand the evolutionary processes through which Plasmodium parasites—the causative agents of malaria—acquire drug resistance. In this project, we are interested in expanding the usual focus. Instead of considering only malaria drugs, we will additionally investigate whether drugs intended to treat bacterial or other parasitic infections also impose selection on Plasmodium. In other words, are Plasmodium parasites developing resistance not only to anti-malarial treatments but also to commonly used antibiotics? If so, could this hamper the development of future novel malaria treatments? This project is brand new, and so we are looking for an engaged undergraduate to help with the initial literature review. This literature review will gather information on (1) the main drugs used (both officially and unofficially) in a subset of key malaria-endemic countries and (2) the cellular targets of these drugs. If continuing on with the project, the student will then use computational and statistical approaches to investigate whether the Plasmodium version of these drug targets appear to be adapting to patterns of regional drug use.

Skills required: No prior experience is required

Learning outcomes: In the first semester, you will learn to conduct a thorough scientific literature review that will culminate in giving a brief oral presentation. If continuing for a second semester, you will learn to perform data analysis and statistical testing to look for correlations between drug usage and genetic markers.

Number of hours: Minimum of 5 hours per week.

Mentoring: Depending on the number of hours worked, the student will meet once or twice a week with Dr. Angela Early and will have the opportunity to attend weekly group meetings.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position, but we will support applications for HCRP stipends.

Application information: If you are interested in speaking further about the project, please email your resume to Angela Early (early@broadinstitute.org) to set up a time for a Zoom call.

 

 

Aug 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Cancer Genomics at Dr. Kwiatkowski lab, BWH/HMS

Contact information: Dr. David Kwiatkowski and Dr. Krinio Giannikou, Cancer Genetics Laboratory, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School,  20 Shattuck street, Thorn Research Building, Room 826, http://www.kwiatkowskilab.org/, e-mail: dk@rics.bwh.harvard.edu and kgiannikou@bwh.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: Professor David Kwiatkowski, has an established and acclaimed academic career in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) disease research field. His research group identified the TSC1 gene in 1997 and has pursued numerous studies exploring human molecular genetics of TSC, biological and signaling pathways and therapeutic approaches for TSC tumors. They have generated multiple mouse models of TSC as well as cell line models that are used broadly. His lab has a specific interest in mosaicism in TSC, and the pathogenesis of all of the tumors that occur in this disease. Dr Kwiatkowski is a leader of several clinical trials for TSC, LAM disease and Perivascular Epithelioid malignant tumor (PEComas) with metastatic potential.

Some publications relevant to the research topics covered in the lab:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31506280/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31160751/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27494029/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30593515/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31000673/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32060062/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22456611/

The trainee will get exposure to translational research in the field of TSC and malignant PEComas with the ultimate goal to understand the genetics and transcriptomics of these rare diseases:

  1. Learn how to analyze whole exome sequencing data from tumor samples
  2. Annotate mutations using the Standard Mutation Nomenclature and assess functional significance of genetic variants using in silico prediction tools.
  3. Visualize exome data with graphs and plots-Correlate molecular findings with the clinical data using Graphpad Prism
  4. Perform differential gene expression analysis on whole transcriptome RNA-seq data using Qlucore, Cistrome toolkit and others.
  5. Perform pathway and network analyses on RNA-seq output data using GSEA, DAVID, and other available tools.

Trainees should participate in at least one relevant course or seminar per week in support of their training goals. Courses and seminars are widely available throughout BWH, Harvard Medical School and Catalyst. Offerings and schedules may be found online at:

BWH Research Intranet: http://bwhbri.partners.org

BWH Events Calendar: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/view/viewEvents.aspx?audience=1

Catalyst: http://catalyst.harvard.edu/learning.html
Harvard Medical School: http://itwwebs.med.harvard.edu/EventsCal/ASP-HTML/index.asp

 

Skills required: Previous knowledge in statistical analysis, R code and other computational language is desirable.

Learning outcomes: By the end of their training, the trainee should be able to:

  1. Critically analyze results and understand scientific papers related to our research work
  2. Interpret and present scientific data in an efficient way
  3. Learn to effectively work with other colleagues in a team-based approach.

The trainee will present their findings and analysis at least one laboratory meeting at the end of their training period. If warranted based on their contributions, students will be co-authors on scientific manuscripts.

Number of hours: The project will require at least 4-6 hours/week of commitment, but since it is a remote research training, the number of hours can be much more than that, dependent on the initiative of the student.  This is not a make work project. However, the student can organize their time according to their school schedule.

Mentoring:  Dr. Krinio Giannikou from the Kwiatkowski lab will be the direct supervisor and mentor of the student. Dr. Giannikou will teach, guide and advise the student. She will e-meet with them weekly or as much as needed to discuss the work in progress. Also, she will keep regular contact with them through e-mails.  The student will also have meetings with Dr. Kiatkowski, and attend weekly lab meetings and journal clubs and will have opportunities to present at the lab meetings and journal clubs. The trainee will be encouraged to discuss their findings with other members from Kwiatkowski lab during remote weekly lab meetings.

Student stipend: Volunteer position. The Laboratory does not have funds to pay student stipends, but students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships (https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities)

Application information: Please e-mail your resume/CV along with a cover letter including a brief outline of your interests, goals, and anticipated time availability

to Dr. Kwiatkowski dk@rics.bwh.harvard.edu  and Dr. Giannikou kgiannikou@bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Tropical Forest Ecology, Dr. Moorcroft Lab, OEB

Contact information: Dr. Paul Moorcroft, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, paul_moorcroft@harvard.edu, Museum of Natural History, Suite 43 (currently working remotely), http://moorcroftlab.oeb.harvard.edu/home

Project description and duties:

Large trees are disproportionately important players in global ecosystems, accounting for the majority of carbon storage in a forest stand. Recently, the tallest trees in the tropics were found to occur in Malaysian Borneo. Understanding how these trees function is critical for understanding how they will respond to future global change. The student will contribute to an ongoing research project evaluating characteristics of emergent (large canopy) trees and tree species in Southeast Asian tropical rainforests. Responsibilities will include data cleaning and organizing in R, analyzing tree census data from several tropical forest sites in Malaysian Borneo to calculate diversity, and growth and mortality rates, and conducting statistical analyses. In addition to data analysis, the student will also learn how to create publication-quality figures. Opportunities also exist for working with LiDAR and imaging spectroscopy airborne remote sensing data if the student is interested. These activities will be closely guided and supported by Dr. Elsa Ordway via regular meetings.

Skills required:

- Experience with R is highly desirable.

- Prior use of ArcGIS preferred but not necessary.

Learning outcomes: scientific research skills including: study design, data analysis, science presentations, and scientific writing.

- Data analysis skills: statistical analyses of plant demography and diversity, analysis of airborne remote sensing data

- Data visualization skills

- Co-authorship on a scientific peer-reviewed paper

Number of hours students are expected to work and duration of the project:

- 10-15 hours/week

- length of project – 1 semester with possible opportunities to become involved in additional projects after the completion of this project

Mentoring:

The student will be mentioned by Dr. Elsa Ordway (Postdoctoral Researcher) in the group and will meet with the mentor via Zoom meetings 1-3 times per week as needed. Periodic (approximately bi-weekly) meetings with Dr. Ordway and Prof. Moorcroft. The student is also welcome to attend weekly lab group meetings / talks and frequently meet with PI to present project updates.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position, but students are encouraged to apply for internal Harvard and outside fellowships.

Application information: Email your resume and a short paragraph describing why you’re interested in this research opportunity to Dr. Elsa Ordway at elsa_ordway@fas.harvard.edu.

 

 

 

Aug 26, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational and Systems Biology at Zomorrodi Lab, HMS

Contact information:

Ali R. Zomorrodi

Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center

Massachusetts General Hospital for Children

44 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114

E-mail: azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu

Zomorrodi lab website

Project description and duties:

Zomorrodi lab integrates biological networks, mathematical/statistical/physical models and engineering tools to develop computational mechanistic models of the microbiome and the host. These models are used to advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and to streamline the design of personalized treatments.

Multiple projects that can be entirely performed remotely are available in the following areas:

  1. Reconstruction of metabolic and genetic network models for human cell lines
  2. Computational assessment of the effect of metabolites produced by the gut microbiota on the host metabolic and immune systems by using cell-specific metabolic networks.
  3. Analysis of microbiomic data using statistical methods and machine learning.
  4. Exploring the effect of spatial structure on the equilibrium state of microbial communities by integrating game theory, metabolic networks and physical models.

Skills required:

Having a keen interest in computational research is the only requirement and

no mathematical or programming skills are needed for most projects. For students who are particularly interested in computational modeling or computer programming there are ample opportunities to tailor the projects toward their interests.

Learning outcomes:

Students will learn how computational simulations and biological network models can be used to address translational problems. More broadly, students gain experience in essential research skills including data analysis, interpretation of results, presentations, and scientific writing.

Time commitment:

Negotiable. The PI is flexible to accommodate students’ schedules or other time demands. These projects are intended for the duration of the Fall and can be extended into Spring and beyond upon mutual interest.

Mentoring:

Students will be directly mentored by Dr. Zomorrodi and have the opportunity to remotely interact with other lab members and attend group meetings. Mentorship zoom meetings are held once a week on a regular basis. 

Student stipend:

This is a volunteer research position. Students are encouraged to apply for undergraduate research fellowships such as HCRP or to register for a research course credit.

Application information:

Interested candidates should email a CV to Dr. Zomorrodi at azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu and briefly explain what their interests are. Please use “Fall 2020 Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunities” as the subject of your email.

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Industrial Robot, Biorobotics Lab, Harvard SEAS

Contact information: PI: Rob Howe. Contact: Zeo Liu zixiliu@g.harvard.edu http://biorobotics.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

Dancing with an Industrial Robot

Dr. Merritt Moore is a ballerina and scientist who seeks to bring science & technology and arts together. (https://physicsonpointe.com/) One of her current projects is dancing with an industrial robot (UR-10 from Universal Robots). Here we list a few potential technology focused student projects that contribute in bringing new ways to explore this concept of “dancing with an industrial robot” that are also appropriate for remote work given limited access to hardware due to COVID-19 pandemic. Please note that student ideas are also welcome. The student will be working with Dr. Moore on the performance side and the Biorobotics Lab on the robotics side of the project.

  1. Real-time motion tracking through a high frame rate camera: This project involves developing a task specific (tracking the motion of the dancer) algorithm that operates in real time (minimal latency) to provide information for guiding robot motion. The student will be working with dance footages with the possibility of acquiring a high frame rate camera for demo. The student can evaluate the performance of the overall result with the exact robot through simulation.

Recommended background:

Any of the following: computer vision, image processing, machine learning, software engineering, robotics (for simulation)

  1. Real-time motion tracking through a relatively low cost commercial motion capture systems: In this project, the student is to evaluate existing commercial motion capture systems, identify one that’s within budget and develop a real-time pipeline that provides tracking of the dancer with minimal latency for guiding robot motion. This project has multiple layers as the student works to integrate the system of the motion capture system, explore novel techniques to decrease latency and interpolate with intelligence to push for further performance. The student can evaluate the performance of the overall result with the exact robot through simulation.

Recommended background:

Any of the following: robotics (frames and poses), signal processing, machine learning

  1. Develop novel controls for elaborate end effector (such as ribbons, water fountain, lights, robot hands, walls, screens (for projection)): In this project we explore different ways to add to the performance via interesting attachment to the end effector of the robot. Listed in the title are a few options but we’re open to new ideas in any creative way. Students can pick one to focus or evaluate a few options as appropriate. There are many aspects of this project depending on the choice of the end effector attachment. For instance, modeling the trajectory of the ribbon is a complex task because it is made of soft material, and its motion is affected by not only the end effector’s motion but also environmental factors such as air flow. The student can also choose to combine a few elements to push the limit of visual effect. For instance, one of the famous science museum exhibitions uses lighting and water drops where by changing the frequency of the light, the water drop could appear going upwards. The student can choose to focus on theoretical development, modeling, experimental exploration, or system integration. This work is projected to take place in simulation but hardware setup for validation that’s appropriate for remote work can also be considered.

Recommended background:

Any of the following: signals and systems, robotics, fluid dynamics, acoustics, modeling of soft material, finite element analysis, optimization

  1. Creative and interactive camera view: In this project we have the robot hold a camera while interacting with the dancer. The camera view is projected to a screen at the performance. The specification of this project is open-ended. Here we ask the question: how should the robot move with respect to the dancer to show interesting angles? Where should the robot go to respond to the dancer? By combining choreography and spontaneous motion through visual feedback, can we introduce new elements to this performance? This project is projected to take place in simulation but a combination of simulation and a physical camera (or even a miniature robot) is a possibility, budget allowing.

There are a few interesting potential aspects to this project in addition to the artistic side including but limited to the control of the robot through kinematics, understanding what the camera sees through real-time computer vision, exploring artistic way of setting a scene through machine learning, and in case of using a camera, integrating with the camera so that one can get the video stream and change the settings dynamically (zooming focusing etc)

Any of the following: robotics, computer vision, image processing, machine learning

Learning outcomes: research experience in robotics/computer vision/machine learning/software engineering

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: negotiable

Mentoring: Mentoring will be provided by PI and a graduate student in the bio robotics lab. Mentorship meetings are flexible but at least once every two weeks. The student is welcome to attend group meetings.

Student stipend: The student is encouraged to apply for undergraduate research funding: https://uraf.harvard.edu/research-funding

Application information: Please email your resume to zixiliu@g.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Biorobotics Lab, Harvard SEAS

Contact information: PI: Rob Howe. Contact: Zeo Liu zixiliu@g.harvard.edu http://biorobotics.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

Computer Vision for An Autonomous Poop-Picking Robot for a Service Dog Facility

Facilities such as the service dog project at Ipswich, Massachusetts are always in need for volunteers to help pick up poop from the puppies and adult dogs that are raised and trained to help people with mobility issues. Poop-picking is an important job however unexciting it may seem. The long term goal of is to build an autonomous robot/drone that tackles this task so that the human volunteers at this facility can focus on the interactions with the dogs. At this facility, there are webcams that streams live 24/7 (such as https://explore.org/livecams/service-dog-project/great-danes-service-puppies-puppy-hill).

The particular aim of this project is to develop computer vision algorithms to automatically detect the action of a dog pooping by running real-time image analysis of the webcams, estimate the location of the poop so that a robot can be sent out for retrieval. Another aspect of this project is processing the image from a camera that is attached to the robot to locate the poop on board of a robot in real time. Note that the major difference is that now the camera is moving and we may be working with visual occlusion when parts of the robot could be blocking the view.

This project has many exciting engineering layers that include but is not limited to image processing, machine learning (likely a convolutional neural network to detect pooping posture), real-time processing, embedded image processing, system integration (pull images from the webcam), and user interface. The student may choose to focus on whichever aspect they find exciting.

Necessary Background:

Any of the below:

- Machine learning experience

- Image processing experience

- Embedded systems

Learning outcomes: research experience in computer vision/machine learning/software engineering

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: negotiable

Mentoring: Mentoring will be provided by PI and a graduate student in the bio robotics lab. Mentorship meetings are flexible but at least once every two weeks. The student is welcome to attend group meetings.

Student stipend: The student is encouraged to apply for undergraduate research funding: https://uraf.harvard.edu/research-funding

Application information: Please email your resume to zixiliu@g.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Synho Do, Ph.D., Laboratory of Medical Imaging and Computation, Department of Radiology, MGH

Contact information:

Synho Do, MS, Ph.D. (sdo@mgh.harvard.edu)

Director, Laboratory of Medical Imaging and Computation

Assistant Medical Director, Advanced Health Technology Engineering, Research, and Development, MGPO, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School

Project description and duties:

We are seeking undergraduate students for projects related to the development of Artificial Intelligence for medical imaging. There are three projects offered, all of them are related to AI (Artificial Intelligence) analysis tools developed for medical images.

A.     Capsule endoscopy

Capsule endoscopy (CE) is a non-invasive, specialized tool used to explore the digestive tract. It shoots an 8 to 12 hour-long video as it passes through the small bowel and produces more than 100,000 images per case. It provides plenty of information that cannot be obtained by other medical tools, but it takes more than an hour to review the video by expert physicians and may miss important information in the process.

We are developing a Computer-Aided Diagnosis tool for capsule endoscopy using machine learning. For this, we have a few sub-projects regarding identifying digestive organs, distinguishing normal structures from abnormal lesions, and estimating quality of bowel preparation, etc. Students will be involved in developing frame processing, feature extraction, and/or classification algorithms.

B.     CXR (Chest X-ray Radiography)

Despite the wide variety of findings that can be seen in a chest radiograph, most algorithms for automated classification of chest radiographs are limited in their number of findings. To solve this effectively, we developed the convolutional neural network (CNN) models by all visual findings extracted from our natural language processing (NLP) algorithm, MGH CXR data, and reports. The further works are related to improving performance and explainability of our AI model as follows:

  • Developing an automatic image-based iterative method for isolating noisy labels on Chest X-ray
  • Developing new visualization methods for highly explainable AI models
  • Developing new keywords generation methods for explainable AI models

C.     NLP (Natural Language Processing)

NLP is a part of artificial intelligence, and the goal is making an interface for computers to interpret and understand human language. NLP technology is already in our lives through Apple Siri, Amazon Alexa, or Google translator, and it will also be important for processing medical records. By using NLP, we can make apps for diagnostic aids, or more easily collect large volumes of data for other AI learning.

One of our current NLP projects is to make a program that automatically extracts disease or its characteristics from chest X-ray reports composed of huge amounts of sentences. The final goal is to identify the statistical characteristics of chest X-ray reports and create a database for developing other AI Students will be involved to make basic data for NLP training, train AI network, and improve the performance of NLP programs.

Skills required:

  • Knowledge of deep learning neural networks
  • Experience in frameworks such as PyTorch (preferred), TensorFlow, Keras etc.
  • Proficiency in programming in Python 

Learning outcomes:

Students can develop skills while working with cutting edge machine learning technologies.

Students develop academic communication skills in preparation for graduate study and academic career.

The goal of this project is to submit an academic paper to a peer-reviewed journal or conference.

Expectations: The student would be expected to spend 10-15 hrs./week on this project for more than one semester.  There is, however, flexibility in the schedule that can be discussed between the applicant and the PI.

Mentoring: Students will be co-mentored by PI Dr. Do and his Post Doctoral research fellows in the group and meet the mentor 1-2 times per week via Microsoft team meetings. Students will be invited to the group’s Microsoft Teams channel where they can connect with other members of the group. Students can also attend weekly lab meetings (on Mondays) and frequently meet with Dr. Do to present project updates.

Student stipend: This position is non-paid. However, our previous interns have received a fellowship for their research with our support and help. 

Application informationPlease send your resume and a brief description of your interest in via email to prof. Synho Do, Ph.D. (sdo@mgh.harvard.edu) and Joowon Chung, MD, Ph.D. (jwchung@mgh.harvard.edu).

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Krichevsky Lab, BWH

Contact information: Dr. Anna Krichevsky, Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases, Neurology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School

Email address: akrichevsky@bwh.harvard.edu

Lab website: https://krichevskylab.bwh.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: Our laboratory focuses on regulatory RNA molecules, such as microRNAs and lncRNAs, their role in brain tumors and neurodegenerative diseases, and potential as novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers. We are also interested in the RNA-mediated intracellular communication between brain tumors and normal cells of their microenvironment. Our overall goal is to develop basic RNA research toward a cure for glioblastoma (GBM), other brain tumors, and neurodegeneration. We recently performed a large screen and collected a dataset of small molecule compounds modulating the expression of various microRNAs in human iPSC-derived neurons. We are seeking a student who will help with exploring and analyzing the dataset, as well as generating novel hypotheses to be tested in cellular and animal models of neurologic diseases.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required, though a general interest in molecular biology and neuroscience is preferred. Background in computational data analysis and/or statistics would be beneficial. Applications from new undergraduate researchers are encouraged.

Learning outcomes: Prospective student is expected to acquire fundamental research skills including reading and understanding the scientific literature, analyzing data, designing new experiments, and scientific writing and presentation.

Number of hours students are expected to work: At least 8 hours per week, but can be flexible.

Mentoring: Student will be mentored remotely through zoom by a postdoctoral fellow and PI on a weekly basis. The student is also welcomed to attend research group zoom meetings.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position. Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships. Assistance may be provided for fellowship applications.

Application information: Interested students should send short email including a statement of academic background and research interest (less than 400 words), resume or CV, and transcript to Dr. Krichevsky.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, Department of Statistics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

Contact information: Marie-Abele Bind, Department of Statistics, Science Center, Room 608, https://scholar.harvard.edu/marie-abele

Project description and duties: Development or applications of causal inference methods and software for quantifying the effects of randomized or non-randomized exposures (e.g., air pollution, temperature) on outcomes (e.g., fatal accident, crime, mortality).

Skills required: No prior research experience required. New undergraduate researchers and candidates with basic understanding of probability and statistics, and with some experience in R programming are encouraged to apply.

Learning outcomes: R programming skills, research skills such as study design for causal inference in randomized and non-randomized studies, statistical analysis methods (Fisherian, Neymanian, and Bayesian inference), presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Negotiable. Ideally, students are expected to work 5 to 10 hours a week. Length of the project: one semester.

Mentoring: Dr. Bind will be mentoring the undergraduate with the help of Dr. Young Lee (Post-doc). Weekly or bi-weekly mentorship meetings. Students are encouraged to attend group meetings.

Student stipend: Unpaid position. Students are encourage to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities.

Course credit: Students can conduct research for course credit.

Application information: Students should email their resume to Dr. Bind at ma.bind@mail.harvard.edu.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity with the Stroke microsimulation for Health outcomes and Interventions to Evaluate policies for Long-term Decision-making (SHIELD) Team, HSPH

Contact information: Ankur Pandya, Health Policy and Management (HSPH), anpandya@hsph.harvard.edu, 718 Huntington Ave 2nd floor (Longwood), https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/ankur-pandya/

Project description and duties: Stroke is a leading cause of death, disability, and healthcare costs in the United States. We are developing and applying the SHIELD model to quantify the key tradeoffs among health benefits, risks, and costs for any feasible stroke prevention or treatment policies. Example publications:

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2702211

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0148106

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2396476

All of the research for this project can be (and is currently being done) remotely (i.e., from home as opposed to on campus).

Skills required: No prior research experience is required. Familiarity with working with data, coding in R or C++, and literature reviews could help.

Learning outcomes: Public health research skills such as cost-effectiveness analysis and risk prediction modeling study design, in addition to essential research skills such as literature reviews and scientific manuscript/presentation preparation. Note we are not a wet lab nor do we conduct any research with human subjects -- instead, we work with secondary data and simulation modeling to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of stroke prevention and treatment policies.

Number of hours 5 hours/week for at least 2 semesters (summer included). 

Mentoring: The undergraduate will work closely with Dr. Pandya and Harvard PhD students on the project in addition to several academic physicians from Harvard Medical School and Weill Cornell Medical College who collaborate with the SHIELD modeling team. Student can attend weekly group research meetings (via Zoom), and have mentoring meetings 2-4 times per month with Dr. Pandya (via Zoom).

Student stipend: We can pay $15-20 per hour depending on tasks being performed. 

Course credit: No expected to be applicable unless circumstances call and allow for it.

Application information: Email your resume and a short statement of interest to Dr. Pandya at anpandya@hsph.harvard.edu

 

 

Jul 2, 2020

Remote or in person (depending on University policy) Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Elisabetta del Re, BIDMC

Contact information: Elisabetta_delre@hms.harvard.edu, BIDMC, Psychiatry
Project description
 and duties: 2 projects: 1. Genetics of hippocampus in psychosis; or 2. Genetic topography of the brain. For duties see learning outcomes

Skills required: No prior research experience is required

Learning outcomes: study design, data analysis methods, computer analyses of brain, literature review, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Flexible

Mentoring: Dr. del Re and an RA will supervise the student; Whether online or in person, the mentor will meet 2 times a week, 1 hr each meeting

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position.

Application information: Please email your resume to Elisabetta_delre@hms.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cognitive Neuroscience Group (CNG), MGH

Contact information: Lauryn Zipse, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, lzipse@mghihp.edu, 617-643-3245

Project description and duties: The research intern will assist with development of an app-based assessment of cognitive and language function to track recovery after stroke.

Skills required: Programming experience required, preferably but not necessarily using Xcode.

Learning outcomes: The research intern will work with an interdisciplinary team based at MGH to learn about stroke recovery, evaluation of language and cognition, and tele-assessment.

Number of hours expected: The number of hours per week and duration of involvement are negotiable.

Mentoring: Dr. Lauryn Zipse will be the primary mentor. The research intern will have the opportunity to participate in team meetings, via Zoom, with an interdisciplinary team of medical professionals and researchers.

Student stipend: This is currently a volunteer position.

Application information: Email your resume and a cover letter/email to Dr. Lauryn Zipse at lzipse@mghihp.edu

 

May 18, 2020

Game Development and Motor Skills, Mahadevan Lab, SEAS

Contact information: Mahadevan , Cambridge,  https://www.seas.harvard.edu/softmat/

Project description and duties: Students will help in design and implementation of computer (and virtual reality) games to study motor skills in humans, including 3D drawing. 

Skills required: Experience with programming, some knowledge of statistics and desire to learn game development in the C# language and the Unity game engine. 

Learning outcomes: The student will acquire knowledge about human motor control and experience in game development as well as data processing and model building.

Number of hours: (20-40) hours. Depending on task completion, desired learning outcome and student's excitement about the project.

Mentoring: Weekly meeting, more as needed. Students allowed to attend research group meetings.

Stipend: Students are encouraged to apply for Harvard / outside fellowships.

Application Information: Email salem@seas.harvard.edu

 

 

May 13, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational Physics, Dept. of Physics

Dr. Anna Lappala, Department of Molecular Biology & MGH and Prof. Lakshminarayanan Mahadevan, Department of Physics).

Contact information: Anna Lappala (lappala@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu)

Project description and duties: The aim of this project is to develop a statistical mechanics model of entanglement in polymer networks using Molecular Dynamics simulations. The student will learn how to generate initial state configurations and run Molecular Dynamics simulations of coarse grained polymer networks on local machines and remote high performance computing clusters. They will also learn how to analyze data in Python and develop analytical skills to study complex soft matter systems. The student will write a report and present their results in a group meeting (guided by his mentor), as an informal exercise in writing articles and giving scientific talks.

Skills required: This project is ideal for students in Physics/Engineering. Previous coding experience in Python would be helpful. No previous experience in Molecular Dynamics simulations required.

Learning outcomes: The student will learn how to set up and analyze Molecular Dynamics simulations of coarse-grained polymer chain networks. They will also develop research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing. Undergraduate projects in previous years have resulted in publications (an example can be found by following the link below:

 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-40286-2.)

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: Flexible

Mentoring: Dr Anna Lappala will be mentoring the undergraduate over zoom regularly (daily 30 minute zoom meetings in the beginning, more flexible as the project progresses). The student can attend Professor Mahadevan’s group zoom meetings twice a week.

Student stipend: Stipend will be provided.

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Anna Lappala at (lappala@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu)

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Hirschhorn Lab, Boston Children's Hospital

Contact information: Joel Hirschhorn, Department of Endocrinology, Joel.Hirschhorn@childrens.harvard.edu, Boston Children's Hospital Center for Life Science building floor 16, https://www.joelhirschhornlab.org/

Project description and duties: Human genetics has the potential to uncover new disease biology and predict health outcomes. Genome-wide association studies have identified hundreds of thousands of genetic variants associated with human diseases and traits, but translating these associations to actionable biology is difficult. One approach is to consider the associated variants in combination, to create individualized genetic predictors called polygenic risk scores (PRS). A major unmet challenge is that prediction using PRS is less accurate when predicting in populations of non-European ancestries, leading to health disparities in the application of genomic medicine to the clinic, and missed opportunities in studying the impact of genetic variation across populations. This project aims to use data from multiple populations to understand the reasons why PRS do not transfer well across ancestries, and to develop methods to improve their transferability and their ability to provide insights into biology across ancestry. The project will use anthropometric traits (human height and obesity) to address these questions. A strong background in computational skills, human/population genetics or (ideally) both will help the applicant be successful in this project.
Student will be expected to create PRS models using large datasets and evaluate results.

Skills required: Computer Science and Biology background; preferably experience with Python or R, unix, and an interest in human genetics. 

Learning outcomes: general research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing, as well as hands-on experience working with large human genetics datasets.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: negotiable, between 8-40 hours/wk. At least summer, but extended duration negotiable.

Mentoring: regular (daily-weekly) meetings with graduate advisor, regular (1 per 2 weeks) meetings with PI and graduate advisor. Student is encouraged to attend lab meetings and present on work.

Student stipend: Stipend is available at standard Boston Children’s rates; students seeking a stipend are strongly encouraged to apply for any applicable summer research fellowships. Course credit: Students can also conduct research for course credit (however, a student cannot earn course credit and be paid a stipend in the same semester).

Application information: Email your resume to Dr. Joel Hirschhorn at Joel.Hirschhorn@childrens.harvard.edu

 

Posted May 6, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Prof. Mahadevan/Prof. Nagpal Lab, SEAS

Contact information: Nagpal/Mahadevan, SEAS, nagpal@g.harvard.edu/ lmahadev@g.harvard.edu, Cambridge, MA [https://ssr.seas.harvard.edu/   /  https://www.seas.harvard.edu/softmat/ ]

Project description and duties: 

The North American beaver acts as a geomorphic agent by modifying the landscape over considerable spatial and temporal scales.  To study habitat modification by beaver, drones were used to generate high resolution maps of beaver habitats.  This project will focus on annotating features in the beaver’s environment using ArcMap.  Annotate maps using ArcGIS for features created by beaver.

Skills required: ArcGIS experience

Learning outcomes: ArcGIS experience, R language coding skills, Python language coding skills, data analysis, research communication/presentation

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if these are negotiable, state so. Some students may choose to take summer courses, so perhaps flexibility in this area will result in more students applying)  20 - 40 hr/week  (Task base completion)

Mentoring: Jordan Kennedy, Graduate student

How often are mentorship zoom meetings - weekly,  and can the student attend research group zoom meetings: yes

Student stipend: $5000/10 weeks 

Application information: email jokennedy@g.harvard.edu

 

 

Posted May 4, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity: Machine Learning & Applied Physics, Mahadevan Lab, SEAS

Contact information: Prof. L. Mahadevan  lmahadev@g.harvard.edu  
SEAS, Harvard University https://www.seas.harvard.edu/softmat/

Project description: Complex dynamical systems widely exist in nature, especially in biological systems. These systems stem from simple physical principles but exhibit rich patterns at various spatial and temporal scales. Due to their complexity, solving the exact dynamics and control problem from bottom-up mathematical modeling remains a challenging task. Recently, there has been a huge technological advance in the field of machine learning (especially deep learning and reinforcement learning) that has empowered a top-down approach for scientific studies. In this project, we explore ways in which machine learning can help us understand the basic scientific principles underlying complex dynamical systems.

Duties:

1. Build a simulator that simulates the dynamics and control problem in a selected scientific domain of interest. Students will have the freedom to choose a domain of their own interest.

2. Apply and tune state-of-the-art deep reinforcement learning algorithms on the simulated control problem and perform a study on how different assumptions give rise to different scientific patterns.

3. Develop academic communication skills including technical presentations and academic paper writing.

 

- Skills required: 

1. Proficiency in programming and software engineering (Python will be the primary language)

2. Basic knowledge in machine learning (CS181)


- Learning outcomes:

1. Students can define their own problem in an fast-progressing interdisciplinary area of research

2. Develop skills working with cutting edge machine learning technologies

3. Develop academic communication skills in preparation for graduate study and academic career

4. Goal of this project is to submit an academic paper to a peer-reviewed journal or conference


- Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project

1. Minimal commitment of 20 hours per week during summer time

2. The student is welcomed to keep working on the project during regular school year


- Mentoring:

Students will be mentored by a senior PhD student in the group and meet with the mentor 1-2 times per week via zoom. Students will be invited to the group's slack channel where they can connect with other members of the group. Students can also attend weekly group meetings / talks and frequently meet with PI to present project updates.

- Student stipend: Negotiable depending on level of commitment

- Application information: Please submit your application via email to prof. Mahadevan (lmahadev@g.harvard.edu) and Kexin Yi (kyi@g.harvard.edu) and include the following information

1. A short statement indicating academic background and research interest (less than 400 words)
2. Resume or CV
3. Transcript

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Lipschitz, Digital Behavioral Health & Informatics Research Program, BWH

 

Contact information: Jessica Lipschitz, BWH Department of Psychiatry, 221 Longwood Ave, Boston MA 02115, http://digitalhealth.bwh.harvard.edu/

 

Project description and duties: Student will assist with two review manuscripts. One focused on a review of randomized controlled trials of mobile app interventions for depression and the other focused on use of ecological momentary assessment in studies of mental illness. Primary responsibilities will be screening articles for inclusion in the review and extraction of key information/data from articles. There will be opportunities for virtual inclusion in interdisciplinary lab meetings and research talks.

 

Skills required: Good reading and writing skills; Attention to detail; Motivated and engaged students will be included as authors on resulting scientific publications.

 

Learning outcomes: improve understanding of process of assembling writing a systematic review, improved understanding of clinical trials in digital health and psychiatry, exposure to various areas of research in mental/behavioral health and informatics/digital health.

 

Number of hours students are expected to work: Negotiable, at least 10 hours per week for 12 weeks.

 

Mentoring: student will have one mentoring meeting per week with Dr. Lipschitz and close communication with Dr. Lipschitz throughout the week. Opportunities to engage with other PIs including Dr. Katherine Burdick as well as Dr. Lipschitz’s computer science collaborators will also be a possibility. All mentoring meetings will be via zoom.

 

Student stipend: Unpaid

 

Application information: Please send a short email with resume attachment to jlipschitz@bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, LCN, Martinos Center, MGH

Contact information: Lilla Zöllei, PhD Assistant Professor of Radiology, HMS Email: lzollei@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu Phone: 617-643-7791

https://scholar.harvard.edu/lillazollei/home

A.A .Martinos Center, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129 https://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/lab/lcn

Project description and duties: There are three projects offered. All of them are related to automated brain image analysis tool developed for the analysis of infant brain MRI images.

1. literature review: to dive into the rapidly developing vast literature for deep-learning based methods related to the tools that are currently being developed in the lab (eg.: spatial registration and cortical and subcortical labeling)

2. generation of digital material (movies, figures, plots, ...) to promote existing research work in popular science

3. manual editing and / or labeling of anatomical areas; scoring the accuracy of automated tool outcomes where ground truth data does not exist Sample publications that relate to the above tasks ca be found at: https://arxiv.org/abs/2001.03091 https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.12101 https://arxiv.org/abs/2004.04617 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1053811919304434

Skills required: For the above projects, the student is expected to have a general interest in and high level curiosity for neuroscience, computational methods and / or human neurodevelopment.

Particular skills per project:

1. great communication and writing skills, basic understanding of deep learning methods

2. advanced knowledge of an image / video editing software and / or scientific plotting tools

3. basic knowledge of human neuroanatomy, attention to detail

Learning outcomes: presentation skills, data analysis methods, insight into a fastly developing research area, possibility of connecting with multiple people from a diverse group of scientists

Expectations: Ideally, the student would be expected to spend 6-8 hrs/ day on this project for a duration of 8 weeks. There is, however, flexibility in the schedule and that can be discussed between the applicant and the PI.

Mentoring: The PI will be mentoring the undergraduate directly. There will be daily check-ins required and a minimum of 2 live chats per week. The student will be able attend weekly research group zoom meetings of the Laboratory of Computational Neuroimaging.

Student stipend: This can be a paid position. Students are also encouraged to apply for Harvard / outside fellowships.

Application information: Email your CV and cover letter to Dr. Lilla Zöllei at lzollei@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

Posted April 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Hodin’s Gastrointestinal Epithelial Biology Laboratory, MGH

PI: Dr. Richard Hodin, Department of Surgery, and Massachusetts General Hospital.

Location: Jackson Research Building, 50 Blossom Street, Boston, MA 02114

Email: RHODIN@mgh.harvard.edu

Project description:

The goal of the ongoing research is to understand the normal gut epithelial development, gut microbiome, pathological conditions such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn’s/Colitis, other gut-derived diseases and the role of an enzyme called intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) in improving gut barrier and health. The intestinal defensive mechanisms are diminished in patients due to lower synthesis and activity of endogenous IAP, but the mechanism of lack or deficiency of IAP remains unclear. The various ongoing projects are related to uncover the mechanism of IAP in the context of gut barrier and diseases.

We are seeking a qualified undergraduate student that is committed to engaging in our gastrointestinal biology research at MGH.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required

Learning outcome: Mastery of laboratory skills in molecular biology, cell biology, animal handling, and microscopy. Students will also develop core research skills in project design, conducting literature review, designing controlled experiments, analyzing and interpreting scientific data, presenting research findings, and scientific writing (e.g., honors thesis, publication in scientific journals). Students will have the opportunity to contribute as a co-author in any published manuscripts.

Number of hours: Negotiable. A useful guideline is >10 hrs/week. Length of project is negotiable. Based on the student’s time and interest they can engage in independent basic science study.

Mentoring: The trainee will work directly under the supervision of a postdoctoral fellow (Dr. Vidisha Mohad), with Dr. Hodin’s active involvement.

Zoom meetings:  1-2/week will be required. Student is expected to attend research group meetings whenever possible.

Stipend: Volunteer position (No Stipend)

Students are encouraged to apply to the Harvard College Research Program (HCRP) or other fellowships for funding support. Course credit: Juniors and seniors may earn academic credit and are especially encouraged to consider basing an honors thesis on research conducted in the laboratory.

Apply: Prospective applicants should apply by submitting a curriculum vitae and a brief cover letter describing the applicant’s research interests and career goals. Please send CV and letter to Dr. Mohad (vmohad@mgh.harvard.edu)

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Nanotechnology and photodynamic therapy, MGH

Contact Information: Tayyaba Hasan, PhD   Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School

Mentor name:  Mohammad Ahsan Saad, PhD MSAAD1@mgh.harvard.edu

Faculty/PI emailthasan@mgh.harvard.edu

Lab location:  Bartlett Hall, Room 314C

Secondary/co-mentor name:  Jasenthu Liyana Pushpamali de Silva, PhD

Secondary/co-mentor primary emailJLDESILVA@mgh.harvard.edu

Project 1: Multi-inhibitor nanoconstructs for Cancer Therapeutics combination treatment

The multiple inhibitors include a photosensitizer, a chemotherapy agent or a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Student will learn the synthesis, physical characterization and optimization of tumor-targeted, photo-activatable nanoconstructs that can co-deliver multiple inhibitors without pre-mixing the agents.

Project 2: Bacterial resistance strategy foiled by light activatable molecular systems: identification of appropriate antibiotics for infection control.

The broad goal of this application is to develop a platform for rapidly identifying antibiotic susceptibility for a broad class of bacterial infections. Student will be involved in microfluids and chemistry of making cleavable probes. While that work progresses toward development of an integrated clinical system, we propose to broaden the platform to the carbapenem class of antibiotics because of their emerging role in infections, particularly in wounds. This proposal will initiate the preliminary development of chemistry for targeting the carbapenemase enzyme (which destroys carbapenem antibiotics) and explore the development of a cell phone based optical reader. This work is ongoing with clinical samples in Thailand.

Project keywords:  Photodynamic Therapy, Nanotechnology, Infections, Microfluidics, Optical Methods and Cancer

Desired student qualifications (e.g. courses taken, prior experience):  Chemical Engineering, Biology, Chemistry, Physics

What trainings could the students complete before the summer:  Familiarity with cell culture

What tools at CNS or other facilities will be used for this project:  Light scattering systems, spectroscopy, cell culture, cancers.

 

Remote Undergraduate Bioinformatics Research Opportunity – Building a Viral Sequence Database, Dr. Yu Lab, Ragon Institute

Contact information: Dr. Ce Gao, Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard
cgao4@mgh.harvard.edu  400 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139
Lab website: https://www.ragoninstitute.org/portfolio-item/yu-lab/

Project description and duties: Yu Lab at Ragon Institute has the unique opportunity to sequence a large quantity of HIV viral samples from various patient cohorts. In addition, scientists and clinical investigators in the lab have further characterized the immune response landscape of the corresponding patients in a variety of ways. Both endeavors generated a large amount of data, the compilation and analysis of which will greatly facilitate several on-going biomedical studies. A candidate of this project is responsible to process all the experimental data, and deposit them in a well-designed viral sequence database. Last but not least, the candidate will help investigators in the lab to query the database and perform statistical analysis based on the results.

For past publications, please follow the links: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30688658

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31776292

Skills required: a) Biology (A basic understanding of molecular biology; Knowledge about virology and DNA sequencing is preferred), Computer science (Data science skills: a basic skill with a script programming language (python or R preferred), statistics (Working knowledge of relational database design and management)

Learning outcomes: By the end of this program, the candidate will:

  • Have an exposure to real-life biomedical research from the perspective of computational biology/bioinformatics
  • Gain a basic understanding of virology, in particular, knowledge about human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
  • Learn fundamental bioinformatics skills: sequencing data collection and processing
  • Have the opportunity to present the work to a general audience

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: The candidate is expected to work about 16 hours per week, remotely. The project will take 2 months.

Mentoring: The candidate will be supervised by a bioinformatics specialist and have weekly zoom meetings with their mentor. She/he will also participate in the weekly (remote) research group meetings.

Student stipend: No stipend available.

Application information: Please send your resume and a brief description of your interest in this position to Dr. Gao (cgao4@mgh.harvard.edu).

 

 

Posted April 23, 2020
 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in biomedicine, Dr. Zygmanski Lab, BWH

Contact information:

Davide Brivio, Medical Physics Division, Radiation Oncology Department, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 75 Francis St. Boston MA

dbrivio@bwh.harvard.edu

Dr Zygmanski Lab website: http://mesoscopic.bwh.harvard.edu/

 

Project description and duties:

We exploit biophysics, physics, mathematics, and computer engineering to advance the fields of medical imaging and cancer therapy. We are developing

  1. novel sensors employing nano- and micro-structured thin films to monitor  treatment of cancer patients (see for instance these recent publications https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6463/ab83c0; https://doi.org/10.1002/mp.13841)
  2. new   cancer therapy and imaging modalities employing nanoparticles and/or electromagnetic and x-ray radiations (see for instance these recent publications https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6560/aa5bc7; https://doi.org/10.2217/nnm-2017-0344)

We propose two Undergraduate Summer projects which can be entirely conducted remotely.

  1. Title: Application of low-to-high intensity/frequency electric fields to imaging of tissues and disruption of cancer cells.

The project consists in the review of the state-of-the-art imaging and cancer therapy techniques utilizing electric fields fields. There are several potential advantages of electric field based techniques compared to the standard x-ray based techniques: specificity of detection or targeting of cancer cells, possibility of spectral analysis and utilization of resonance effects, low-toxicity due to usage of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation.. Several exciting preliminary investigations are reported in the literature but currently very few are sufficiently mature for clinical utilization. We aim to investigate the state of the art of these novel promising techniques at two scales: macroscopic (tissue) and nanoscopic (cell). The ideal candidate should critically review the literature, with the support of the PI and a post-doc and prepare a report.

  1. Title: Novel tool for simulating radiotherapy treatment beams for educational and research purposes

This is a computational project employing a new software tool to study radiation properties for education and research in simplified scenarios. Student are expected to setup the simulator software and to study simple radiotherapy scenarios: geometry, materials (tumor tissue with or without gold nanoparticles as contrast agents or microstructured radiation detectors, etc.). Physics, mathematics or computer engineering knowledge is a plus. The ideal candidate should have good analytical and computational skills.   

 

Skills required: For project 1, 2 no particular skills or research experience are required. Although students with biomedicine, physics or mathematics or computer engineering major are ideal for better understanding of the concept involved.

Learning outcomes:

In project 1. the student will learn the science of electromagnetic interaction with matter applied to specific medical scenarios. The student will learn how to review scientific publications and will acquire scientific communication skills. 

In project 2. the student will learn the basics physics of x-ray radiation interaction with matter for medical and high-energy physics scenarios. The student will learn the basics of setting up a Monte Carlo simulation software and how to analyze the results. The student will acquire scientific communication skills.  

Number of hours: The number of hours students are expected to work is negotiable. A minimum of four hours to eight hours per week is required during the academic year and a minimum of 30 hours per week during the summer. However, a flexible schedule is possible.

Mentoring: the student will be mentored by the Harvard Medical Physics Resident Dr Davide Brivio and by the lab Principal Investigator (PI) Dr Piotr Zygmanski. Zoom meetings will be scheduled at the student convenience (weekly or more often when more support is needed). The student can also attend research group zoom meetings. Day to day communication will be via email.

Student stipend: Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Davide Brivio at dbrivio@bwh.harvard.edu with a short description of your research interests and of your goals of completing a research experience.

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Rahme Lab, MGH


Contact information:  PI: Laurence Rahme  Department: Department of Surgery
Contact Information: 617-724-5003  E-mail: rahme@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu
Location: 340 Thier Research Building, 50 Blossom Street, Boston, MA 02114
Lab Website: https://laurence-rahme-5y35.squarespace.com

 

Project description and duties: we can have a discussion. Depending on the interests of the student the projects and duties can be assigned.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required

Learning outcomes: research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: flexible

Mentoring: who will be mentoring the undergraduate: Research Technician, Fellows (can be discussed based on what projects interests more to the student) 

how often are mentorship zoom meetings: once/twice a week

can the student attend research group zoom meetings: encouraged

Student stipend: volunteer position

Application information: Email your resume to Dr. Rahme at rahme@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Gilmore Lab, HMS 

DEVELOPMENT OF A SCHOLARLY TREATISE ON THE FUNDAMENTAL CONSTRAINTS OF LIFE

CONTACT INFORMATION: Dr. Michael S. Gilmore Lab, Department of Ophthalmology (Microbiology), Co-Director, Harvard Microbial Sciences Initiative; Director, Infectious Disease Institute, Harvard Medical School, michael_gilmore@meei.harvard.edu

PROJECT DESCRIPTION AND DUTIES:

In an era when most science is reductionist, critical and fundamental advances are overlooked because the big picture is not seen. A few truly remarkable studies have attempted to catalog and quantify all life as it currently exists on Earth and assess its impact on the planet. These studies have been incredibly illuminating for understanding the nature and resilience of life since its origin. For example, they inform the roles played by various forms of life – microbes, plants, and animals, including humans – in carbon turnover and other processes; and they inform the life strategies used – e.g., differences in primary producers and consumers as driven by the different geographies they occupy. There are several important implications of these landmark studies that now are ripe for further consideration and development. The goal of this project, under mentorship, is to deeply and thoughtfully explore what is known or theorized about a specific implication fundamental to life, and develop a publishable treatise on the topic. 

Keywords: microbes, microbiology, global biomass, evolution, deep time, environment, pathogen, metagenomics, Earth history, life, energy, climate change

SKILLS REQUIRED: Strong self-motivation and ability to work independently and remotely, outstanding ability to quickly and efficiently assimilate and organize information, and excellence in writing ability.

Learning outcomes: Efficient tools for data assimilation, manuscript design, scientific writing, and publication.

NUMBER OF HOURS:  A first step in the project will be for the student to develop a realistic work plan for achieving the goal, considering other time demands, which vary by semester and prior experience.

MENTORING: The student will be mentored directly by Prof. Michael Gilmore, through weekly mentorship zoom meetings?

STUDENT STIPEND: Students are expected to be competitive for fellowship support.

APPLICATION INFORMATION: Detail the information students need to submit and the contact information for submitting this information: Email your resume to Dr. Gilmore at

michael_gilmore@meei.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Scot Martin Lab Group, SEAS/EPS

Contact information: Scot T. Martin, SEAS/EPS, smartin@seas.harvard.edu, 58 Oxford Street Level 3, https://martin.seas.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: Drones are being increasingly used for atmospheric research for in-air gas sampling. One of the main challenges is mitigating the effects of the drone wind field on atmospheric measurements. In this project, the student will perform computational fluid dynamic simulations of rotary-wing drone wind field to determine the influence of the wind field on gases and particles and how this impacts coupled device measurements. The student will develop several different geometries of attachments that could be added to help mitigate the influence of the drone wind field and assess their effects. The final submission will be a presentation to the Martin group, a project report, and potentially a research paper.

Skills required: Experience with any computational fluid dynamics software platform (e.g. StarCCM+, OpenFOAM, Solidworks, Autodesk, Comsol), as well as some knowledge of gas and aerosol physics would be helpful but is not required. This project would be most suited to an undergraduate interested in mechanical or aeronautical engineering and preference will be given to those individuals.

Learning outcomes: Experience with using computational fluid dynamics software and performing computational simulations. Computational research skills such as study design and data analysis methods. Scientific communication skills such as presenting and scientific writing. 

Number of hours: Negotiable but full-time is preferred. Students applying should expect to spend at least 2-3 days a week working on the project.

Mentoring: Matthew Stewart (3rd Ph.D. student working on drone-based chemical sensing). Zoom meetings will be scheduled once or twice a week depending on the student's preference and schedule. The student will be able to attend research group meetings.

Student stipend: Voluntary position.

Application information: Email your resume to matthew_stewart@g.harvard.edu and smartin@seas.harvard.edu, along with a paragraph stating your interest in the project, including the number of hours you will be able to put towards the project and any relevant experience/skills.

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Balu’s Translational Psychiatry Laboratory at McLean Hospital

Contact information:  Darrick T. Balu, Ph.D.  McLean Hospital  Phone: 617-855-2329

Email: dbalu@mclean.harvard.edu

websites:

http://www.mcleanhospital.org/biography/darrick-balu

https://mbb.harvard.edu/people/darrick-balu

Project description and duties:

Dr. Balu’s Translational Psychiatry Laboratory uses a wide array of cutting-edge tools (transgenic mouse lines and viral techniques, biochemistry, molecular biology, immunohistochemistry, and behavior) to understand the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie the synaptic and behavioral abnormalities associated with psychiatric (schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder) and neurologic (Alzheimer’s disease, traumatic brain injury) disorders.

There are several projects that students could be involved with in the laboratory. They all are related to how the D-amino acid, D-serine, and the enzyme that generates it, serine racemase (SR), regulate NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission in the brain. The first project involves understanding how D-serine mediated NMDAR activation regulates GABAergic interneuron development during embryonic and postnatal stages, time-points that are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The second project aims to identify how D-serine release from inflammatory astrocytes contributes to the neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease. The third project aims to define the neural circuits in which serine racemase expressing neurons are engaged during various fear learning tasks, which has implications for anxiety-related disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31212068/?from_term=balu+dt&from_sort=date&from_pos=1

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5806199/

Student will participate in literature search and writing a scientific review article. Student will use Image J data analysis software to count forebrain development markers from brain sections of a schizophrenia mouse model (compared to control), that were stained with fluorescently labeled antibodies. The student can also help with other data analysis (i.e. Western blot results).

Students can learn remotely about how to conduct experiments involving mouse breeding, cognitive behavioral paradigms, brain sectioning, immunofluorescence staining and stereological cell counting.

Skills required: No prior research experience required.  

Learning outcomes: Student will learn how to conduct literature search, write scientific papers, study design, and data analysis methods. Student will be able to communicate findings through presentation at lab meetings and work in a team.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: This is flexible and based on student schedule. PI will consult with student at the beginning of project.

Mentoring: Prospective undergraduate will be mentored remotely by postdoctoral fellow, research technician, and/or PI on a weekly basis. The student can also attend research group zoom meetings.

Student stipend: Volunteer position (NO stipend)

Application information: Email your resume to Prof. Balu at dbalu@mclean.harvard.edu

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Chen Lab, MEEI (Mass Eye and Ear)
Contact information:  Dong Feng Chen, M.D., PhD; Schepens Eye Research Institute of Mass Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School; 20 Staniford Street, Boston, MA 02460
dongfeng_chen@meei.harvard.edu;  Tel: 617-912-7490 
Project description and duties: Dr. Chen's laboratory focuses the studies of the molecular mechanisms controlling neurodegeneration and regeneration in the eye and brain. Their goal is to apply such knowledge to the development of novel neuroprotective and regenerative approaches to treat eye diseases and reverse blindness. One of the current project is centered around the understanding of the roles of immune responses in neuron death and its manipulation for treating glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide.     
Skills required: Prior research experience is preferred but not required. 
Learning outcomes: Students will master basics concepts and skills of molecular and cellular biology, mouse genetics, and neural imaging and learn the study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.
Number of hours: Students are expected to work >10 hours during the school term (flexible) and are encouraged to work full time over the summer (flexible).
Mentoring:  The student will receive direct mentorship from Dr. Chen while the student will also be supervised on a daily basis under a postdoctoral fellow.  Students  student attend research group zoom meetings?
Student stipendStudents are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit
Application information: Email cover letter and resume to Dr. Dong Feng Chen at dongfeng_chen@meei.harvard.edu
 

 

Undergraduate Remote Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, Department of Statistics, FAS

Contact information: Marie-Abele Bind, Department of Statistics, Science Center, Room 608, https://scholar.harvard.edu/marie-abele and http://mablab.info.

Skills required: No prior research experience required. New undergraduate researchers and candidates with basic understanding of probability and statistics, and with some experience in R programming are encouraged to apply.

Learning outcomes: R programming skills, research skills such as study design, statistical analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Negotiable. Ideally, students are expected to work 5 to 10 hours a week. Length of the project: one semester.

Mentoring: Dr. Bind, Dr. Young Lee, and PhD candidate Alice Sommer will be mentoring the undergraduate. Bi-weekly mentorship meetings. Student can attend group meetings.

Student stipend: Unpaid position. Students are encourage to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities.

Course credit: Students can conduct research for course credit.

Application information: Students should email their resume to Dr. Bind at ma.bind@mail.harvard.edu.

 

 

March 18, 2020

Undergraduate research opportunity in the laboratory of Dr. Léger-Abraham, HMS

 

Dr. Léger-Abraham Lab, https://leger-abraham-laboratory.com

Microbiology Department, Blavatnik Institute | Harvard Medical School
New Research Building (940 Laboratory, 1030C Office)

77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA

Email : melissa_leger-abraham@hms.harvard.edu

Phone : (617) 432-2418

 

Description: Malaria is a devastating disease caused by mosquito-borne unicellular protozoan parasites of the Plasmodium genus. Each year, about 200 million cases of human malaria result in the death of more than a million people. Plasmodium falciparum causes the most severe form of the disease. Despite several efforts by the scientific community and global health organizations to decrease malaria-related morbidity and mortality, the incidence of infection is rising with the emergence of strains that are less sensitive to recommended treatment regimens.  

 

Leishmania parasites are distributed across the globe and cause about 1million new cases of leishmaniasis annually. The most severe form of leishmaniasis is lethal if untreated. Few therapies are available, and significant side effects and parasite resistance limit their effectiveness.

 

The Léger-Abraham lab uses methods in structural biology (NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and cryo-EM) to study how translation is carried out in Plasmodium and Leishmania parasites. The goal of these studies is to identify unique protein-protein interactions that could be targeted to generate novel antiparasitic drugs.

 

Skills required: Prior laboratory experience is not required but a good understanding of protein synthesis process is preferred.

 

Learning outcome: As part of this research program, the undergraduate research project will aim to purify messenger RNA fragments and translation initiation factors to be used in structural studies and biochemical assays. The student will obtain training in molecular biology, protein expression, and RNA isolation and purification. The student will be expected to participate in lab meeting and will get mentored to improve presentation and scientific communication skills.

 

Number of hours: The student will be expected to work >15 hours a week during term time (flexible) with full-time work over the summer encouraged.

 

Mentoring: The student will obtain direct mentorship from Dr. Léger-Abraham with additional supervision provided by research fellows.

 

Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or to register for a research course credit.

To apply, send a copy of your CV and contact for two references by email to melissa_leger-abraham@hms.harvard.edu.

 

 

February 28, 2020

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Rakesh Jain, MGH, Harvard

PI: Dr. Rakesh Jain, Director, Edwin Steele Laboratories, https://steelelabs.mgh.harvard.edu/

Project description: Reprogramming the tumor microenvironment in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma to improve immunotherapy.

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has a dismal prognosis and is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 10%. The poor survival of patients with locally advanced PDAC is due to its unresectability, aggressive biology and limited effectiveness of cytotoxic agents. Chemotherapy’s poor efficacy in PDAC has been linked in part to desmoplasia and the inhibition of immune effector cells. Our goal is to reprogram the abnormal PDAC tumor microenvironment to become immunostimulatory and reduce desmoplasia to improve the effectiveness of chemoradiotherapy and immune checkpoint blockade to increase patient survival.

 

We are seeking a qualified pre-medical student that is committed to engaging in our pancreatic cancer biology research at MGH. The trainee will work under the supervision of a postdoctoral fellow and is expected to attend weekly lab meetings. In addition to our pancreatic cancer research, the student can participate in other gastroenterology and hepatic projects. Prospective applicants should apply by submitting a curriculum vitae and a cover letter describing the applicant’s research interests and career goals.

Skills required: No prior experience is required

Learning outcome: Lab skills, in vivo and in vitro experiments, translational research, study design, data analysis, presentations, scientific writing

Number of hours: Depending on the student’s time and interest they can engage in independent basic science and/or translational aspects of our program. Minimum 10 hours/week commitment. Required to attend weekly lab meeting. Length of project is negotiable.

Mentoring: The trainee will work directly under the supervision of a postdoctoral fellow (Dr. Jessica Posada). Students are encouraged to apply to the Harvard College Research Program (HCRP) or other fellowships for funding support. Students can also apply for research course credit. Students will have the opportunity to contribute as a co-author in any published manuscripts.

Apply: Prospective applicants should apply by submitting a curriculum vitae and a brief cover letter/email describing the applicant’s research interests and career goals. Please send CV and letter to Dr. Posada (jposada@partners.org).

 

 

February 4, 2020

Undergraduate Position, Human Thyroid Cancers Preclinical and Translational Research Laboratory, BDIMC

Carmelo Nucera, MD, PhD Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Simon C. Fireman Research Center Harvard Medical School 99 Brookline Avenue Office Room: RN-0270A Email 1: cnucera@bidmc.harvard.edu Office-Phone: 617-667-5964 Lab-Phone: 617-667-1696 Fax: 617-667-3591 Boston (MA) 02215, USA

 

My laboratory is open to accept undergraduate students. I'm genuinely dedicated to mentor undergraduate students and advancing translational Thyroid Cancer Research and non-coding RNA-based discoveries.

I'm actively committed to mentor and apply my research to patient care, to facilitate innovation for healthcare, solve unmet clinical needs, and ultimately improve public health.

I am an MD/PhD with specialty in endocrine cancers and I’m developing as Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School a multidisciplinary research program in the "Division of Cancer Biology and Angiogenesis/Experimental Pathology" at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School, focused on "preclinical and translational models of human thyroid cancer with an emphasis on mechanisms of metastatic networks, new models of in vitro angiogenesis, tumor microenvironment, and metabolic regulations, using novel targeted therapies anti-BRAFV600E anti-tumor microenvironment. I am primarily engaged in basic and translational thyroid cancer research, but also actively participate in tutoring and teaching activities to basic science students and medical students. I have more than 10-years of research and clinical experience.

In particular, my research interests are in elucidating mechanisms by which the oncogene BRAFV600E leads to the invasive and metastatic phenotype in aggressive and iodine-refractory thyroid cancers.

I'm highly committed and motivated to applying my research and effort to patient care, to facilitate innovation, to solve unmet clinical needs, and improve public health.

I have been awarded from the American Thyroid Association, the NIH/NCI for Thyroid Cancer Research, Tumor Microenvironment, and BRAFV600E.

My translational research and mentoring program is aimed:

(i) To determine the prognostic role of Long intergenic non-coding RNA (LIncRNA) in thyroid cancer.

(ii) To identify new prognostic biomarkers and validate therapeutics for treating metastatic/refractory thyroid cancers.

(iii) To identify pro-metastatic/-angiogenic and metabolic pathways in the microenvironment of BRAFV600E-positive thyroid cancer.

(iv)To determine the function of lymphatic/blood vessels in thyroid cancer and identify driver clones in the angiogenic microenvironment of thyroid tumors (tumor heterogeneity).

(v) To investigate pathogenesis and molecular basis of “orphan and rare’ endocrine diseases.

The hours of intershnisp per week are variable and can be discussed and set along with the student.

If you are interested in applying to this program please submit your Curriculum Vitae and email address of 2 references (i.e. Faculty) to:

Carmelo Nucera cnucera@bidmc.harvard.edu 

 

 

Undergraduate Research Position, MGH Cancer Center

Contact information: Leif W. Ellisen, MD, PhD Professor of Medicine, HMS and Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, lellisen@mgh.harvard.edu
CPZN4204, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114;

(617)726-4315  http://ellisenlab.com

Project description and duties: The laboratory studies how transcription factors and DNA damage response pathways contribute to cancer pathogenesis. The major focus is breast cancer and head and neck cancer, where the group investigates how understanding deregulated transcription factors such as p53, and DNA repair factors such as BRCA1/2 can inform new cancer prevention and treatment approaches. Multiple Harvard undergraduates have previously worked in the lab and have gone on to complete their senior honors thesis based on the work.

A well-defined project will be crafted based on students’ particular interests, skills, and time commitment.

Skills required: Working familiarity with research laboratory environments (through prior exposure such as a high school or college summer internship) and at least two of the following college courses completed: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Genetics, Developmental Biology.

Learning outcomes: Mastery of technical skills in routine molecular biology, cell biology, animal handling, and microscopy. Students will also develop core research skills in framing a project, designing controlled experiments, analyzing and interpreting data, presenting research findings, and scientific writing (e.g., honors thesis, publication in scientific journals, descriptions for a lay audience).

Number of hours: Negotiable. A useful guideline is >10 hrs/week.

Mentoring: Direct mentoring will be provided by a senior postdoctoral fellow, with Dr. Ellisen’s active involvement. Student can attend (and make oral presentations in) group meetings.

Student stipend: Students are encouraged (and supported) to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Course credit: Juniors and seniors may earn academic credit and are especially encouraged to consider basing an honors thesis on research conducted in the laboratory.

Application information: Please email Dr. Ellisen at lellisen@mgh.harvard.edu and visit our website at http://ellisenlab.com.

 

 

 

Posted Jan 13, 2020

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Kaiser Lab, Brigham and Women's Hospital

PI name, department, contact information, location, lab website: Dr. Ursula Kaiser, M.D., Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 221 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA

 

Undergraduate basic/translational research assistant

PI name, department, contact information, location, lab website: Dr. Ursula Kaiser, M.D., Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 221 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA

Description of the project and duties: Students will learn key theoretical concepts and varied experimental techniques relating to genetics, mouse models and molecular biology focused on understanding the neuroendocrine regulation of the reproductive axis.  (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=kaiser+ub+and+dlk1 ).

Current projects focus on the mechanism of Makorin Ring Finger Protein 3 (MKRN3), the most common genetic etiology described in children with central precocious (early) puberty, discovered initially by Dr. Kaiser’s lab in 2013. Using a recombinant adeno-associated virus overexpressing Mkrn3, the goal of the current project is to understand how hypothalamic overexpression of Mkrn3 leads to delayed puberty in female but not male mice and to use this a model to understand MKRN3’s mechanism of action.

Skills required. Prior research experience is preferred but not required.

Learning outcome: Students will have the opportunity to learn basic laboratory research skills, study design, data analysis method, presentations, and scientific writing in a vibrant research setting. Research experiences may include but are not limited to animal husbandry, rodent handling, assessment of rodent puberty and reproduction, tissue collection, DNA/RNA/protein extraction, polymerase chain reaction, cell culture and rodent surgical procedures including stereotaxic injection.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: The number of hours students are expected to work is negotiable. A minimum of six hour to ten hours per week is required however a flexible schedule is possible. A minimum commitment of one semester is required, with opportunities available for longitudinal experiences.

Mentoring: Dr. Kaiser will serve as the primary mentor and the student will be supervised on a daily basis by Dr. Stephanie Roberts.  The students will meet with Dr. Roberts on a daily basis and mentoring meetings with Dr. Kaiser will be held frequently. Students are also encouraged to attend the weekly Kaiser laboratory meeting if their schedule allows.

Does laboratory provide any funds to pay student’s stipend? Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

What information students need to submit and contact information for submitting this information: Please email your resume to Dr. Stephanie Roberts at stephanie.roberts@childrens.harvard.edu with a short description of your goals of completing a research experience.

 

 

Posted Jan 10, 2020

Undergraduate Research Position, Dr. Maxim Prigozhin Lab, MCB Department

MCB Department, Quantitative Biology Initiative, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Department of Applied Physics, Harvard University

MULTICOLOR AND TIME-RESOLVED ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF CELL SIGNALING

KEYWORDS: biophysics, optics, single-molecule fluorescence, single-particle electron microscopy, cryo-EM, cathodoluminescence, nanoparticles for biology, cryo-vitrification, time-resolved vitrification, cell signaling, GPCRs, neuroscience Electron microscopy is an ideal imaging technique to study biological cells at the nanoscale. However, typically electron microscopy only provides static black-and-white images. In an effort to enable multicolor and time-resolved electron microscopy, my lab will develop dedicated molecular probes and instrumentation for new correlative light and electron microscopy modalities, and build next-generation biophysical tools for timeresolved cryo-vitrification and high-resolution imaging of cells. These methods will be used to elucidate the nanoscale protein and membrane dynamics of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in differentiated cells and complex tissues.

RESEARCH AREAS:

1) Instrumentation development for single-particle fluorescence and electron

imaging

2) Synthesis, functionalization, and biological applications of nanoparticles

3) Cell biology of GPCR signaling and of neural transmission

If you are interested in joining or have other questions, please contact Max Prigozhin at

maxim_prigozhin@harvard.edu. Graduate students are encouraged to apply through

the following PhD programs at Harvard:

· Molecules, Cells, and Organisms

· Applied Physics

· Systems, Synthetic, and Quantitative Biology

In your application, please indicate your interest in pursuing your PhD work with Max.

 

 

 

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Aguayo-Mazzucato Lab, Joslin Diabetes Center

Cristina Aguayo-Mazzucato MD PhD, Section of Islet Cell and Regenerative Biology

Joslin Diabetes Center rm 468A
1 Joslin Place, Boston, MA 02215   Phone 617 309 4782
Email: cristina.aguayo-mazzucato@joslin.harvard.edu
Website: https://www.joslin.org/find-an-expert/cristina-aguayo-mazzucato

Description of the project and duties: The risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) increases with age and given the importance of beta cell loss/dysfunction in the development of the disease we would like to further our understanding of the effects of beta cell aging in the development of T2D. We have identified markers to evaluate the age of individual beta cells and have mouse models that allow us to specifically delete old beta cells and evaluate the effects of this intervention in the disease. Students would mainly work using rodent models with techniques that range from immunohistochemstry, basic molecular biology, cell culture, islet isolation, evaluation of insulin secretion, ELISA, FACS sorting to animal work with interventions such as high fat diet or implants. Some translational work using pancreatic samples from donors is also available. The role of beta cell aging in type 1 diabetes will also be evaluated.

Links to relevant publications:

1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31767811

2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31155496

3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31155496

4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28380379

5. Video: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-05/jdc-rrb052919.php

 

No prior research experience required.

Learning outcomes

Students will acquire experience in the following competencies of scientific research:

1. Understand the different components of the Scientific Method.

2. Participate in the planning and design of a project

3. Learn and perform the necessary experimental techniques necessary to complete said project.

4. Data analysis and presentation of generated experimental data.

5. Work on scientific writing to communicate relevant information.

Number of hours and length of stay: Approximately 10-15 h per week for a minimum of 3-4 months. However, different arrangements will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Mentoring: Students will be mentored directly by Dr. Aguayo-Mazzucato regarding project design, data analysis, presentation and scientific writing. Students will work in the lab with one of our senior members who will teach them the necessary techniques and assist the students with technical questions. Students are expected to be fairly independent once they have been taught the techniques and an overall plan has been made for the execution of the project. Weekly meetings will be held with the PI to go over obtained results and plan activities for the week ahead.

Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit

Interested candidates should submit a cover letter and resume to Cristina Aguayo-Mazzucato at cristina.aguayo-mazzucato@joslin.harvard.edu

 

 

Posted Jan 2, 2020

Research Assistant, Demehri Laboratory, Center for Cancer Immunology, MGH/HMS

Full time research assistant position is available immediately in our laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School to study the mechanisms of immune regulation of early cancer development and the role alarmins and commensal viruses in this process. The position is ideal for a recent graduate planning to work for couple of years in research before entering graduate or medical school. Besides bench research, applicant will have the opportunity to learn about clinical care for patients with severe skin cancers and skin-related adverse effects of cancer immunotherapies. Attention to detail, high motivation, and effective communication skills are essential. Knowledge in immunological, molecular, and mice experimentations are considered important for this position.

Visit our laboratory website for more detail:

http://massgeneral.link/DemeheriLab

Please email a cover letter and CV to Dr. Shawn Demehri:

sdemehri1@mgh.harvard.edu