Undergraduates: Open Research Positions & Projects

Students: contact Dr. Anna Babakhanyan, Science Undergraduate Research advisor, to help identify research laboratories.
Faculty: if you are interested in posting your open research position, please contact  Dr. Anna Babakhanyan.

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Sang Park, BCH, Posted Sep 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Thoracic Surgery Research at Dr. Yang’s lab, MGH/HMS, Posted Sep 16, 2020

Research Assistant, Demehri Laboratory, Center for Cancer Immunology, Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School, Posted Sep 3, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Radiation Physics and Instrumentation Lab, MGH, Posted Sep 3, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Computational Parasite Genomics, Neafsey Lab, Broad Institute/HSPH, Posted Aug 31, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Evolution of Drug Resistance, Neafsey Lab, Broad Institute/HSPH, Posted Aug 31, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Cancer Genomics at Dr. Kwiatkowski lab, BWH/HMS, Posted Aug 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Tropical Forest Ecology, Dr. Moorcroft Lab, OEB, Posted Aug 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational and Systems Biology at Zomorrodi Lab, HMS, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Industrial Robot, Biorobotics Lab, Harvard SEAS, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Biorobotics Lab, Harvard SEAS, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Synho Do, Ph.D., MGH, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Krichevsky Lab, BWH, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, Department of Statistics, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Undergraduate Research Opportunity with the Stroke microsimulation, HSPH, Posted Aug 26, 2020

Remote or in person (depending on University policy) Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Elisabetta del Re, BIDMC, Posted Jul 2, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cognitive Neuroscience Group (CNG), MGH, Posted Jul 2, 2020

Game Development and Motor Skills, Mahadevan Lab, SEAS, Posted May 18, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational Physics, Dept. of Physics, Posted May 13, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Hirschhorn Lab, Boston Children's Hospital, Posted May 13, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Prof. Mahadevan/Prof. Nagpal Lab, SEAS, Posted May 6, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity: Machine Learning & Applied Physics, Mahadevan Lab, SEAS, Posted May 4, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Lipschitz, Digital Behavioral Health & Informatics Research Program, BWH, Posted May 4, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, LCN, Martinos Center, MGH, Posted May 4, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Hodin’s Gastrointestinal Epithelial Biology Laboratory, MGH, Posted April 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Nanotechnology and photodynamic therapy, MGH, Posted April 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Bioinformatics Research Opportunity – Building a Viral Sequence Database, Dr. Yu Lab, Ragon Institute, Posted April 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in biomedicine, Dr. Zygmanski Lab, BWH, Posted Apr 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Rahme Lab, MGH, Posted Apr 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Gilmore Lab, HMS, Posted Apr 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Scot Martin Lab Group, SEAS/EPS, Posted Apr 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Balu’s Translational Psychiatry Laboratory at McLean Hospital, Posted April 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Chen Lab, MEEI (Mass Eye and Ear), Posted Apr 23, 2020

Undergraduate Remote Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, Department of Statistics, FAS, Posted Apr 23, 2020

Undergraduate research opportunity in the laboratory of Dr. Léger-Abraham, HMS, Posted Mar 18, 2020

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Rakesh Jain, MGH, Harvard, Posted Feb 28, 2020

Undergraduate Position, Human Thyroid Cancers Preclinical and Translational Research Laboratory, BDIMC, Posted Feb 4, 2020

Undergraduate Research Position, MGH Cancer Center, Posted Feb 4, 2020

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Kaiser Lab, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Posted Jan 13, 2020

Undergraduate Research Position, Dr. Maxim Prigozhin Lab, MCB Department, Posted Jan 10, 2020

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Aguayo-Mazzucato Lab, Joslin Diabetes Center, Posted Jan 10, 2020

Research Assistant, Demehri Laboratory, Center for Cancer Immunology, MGH/HMS, Posted Jan 2, 2020

Gene regulation of malignant hematopoiesis using CRISPR and bioinformatics analyses, Dr. Tenen Lab, BIDMC, Posted Dec 6, 2019

Research Assistant, MGH IHP SAiL Literacy Lab, Posted Nov 1, 2019

Understanding the Molecular Mechanism and Developing Therapies in Neuromuscular Diseases, Dr. Gupta, HMS, Posted Nov 1, 2019

Research Assistant/Student Programmer, The Speech and Feeding Disorder Lab (Dr. Jordan Green), MGH Institute of Health Professions, Posted Nov 1, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Center for Brain/Mind Medicine, BWH, Posted Oct 18, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Haider lab, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Posted Oct 18, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in CAR T cell Manufacturing (Novina Lab), Posted Sep 20, 2019

Research Opportunity in functional brain imaging at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH/HMS, Posted Sep 17, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Robin Hopkins Lab at the Harvard Arnold Arboretum, Posted Sep 17, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Konkle Lab, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Posted Sept 17, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Farokhzad Lab, BWH, Posted Sep 17, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. George Church Lab, Harvard Medical School, Posted Sep 17, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity as a Research Assistant,  Health Decision Sciences Center, MGH, Posted Sep 9, 2019 

Undergraduate Clinical Research Opportunity, Cognition and Affect Research and Education Laboratory (CARE Lab), McLean Hospital, Posted Sep 9, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, Department of Statistics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Posted Sep 9, 2019

Undergraduate Research opportunity to study Gram-Negative Bacterial Pathogenesis in Dr. Deborah Hung's Lab, MGH, Posted Sep 9, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Infectious Disease Biology, Broad Institute, Posted Sep 9, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Zӧllei, Laboratory of Computational Neuroimaging, A.A. Martinos Center, MGH, Posted Sep 9, 2019

Growth of high-temperature superconductor FeSe using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), Jenny Hoffman Lab, Physics Department, Posted Sep 9, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Fernandez-Godino Lab, MEEI, Posted Sep 9, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Eva-Maria Ratai’s lab, MGH, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Undergraduate lab assistant position, Taute & Mathis labs, Rowland Institute at Harvard, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Psychiatry/Psychology, Pizzagalli Lab, at McLean Hospital, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Undergraduate Volunteer Research Assistant Opportunity in Psychiatry/Psychology, Pizzagalli Laboratory at McLean Hospital and HMS, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in the Henske Lab, HMS, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Chung Lab, Mass Eye & Ear, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Hasan’s Lab, HMS, MGH, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Student Intern for Dr. Sansevere, Boston Children’s Hospital, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, The Fruit Fly Fight Club, Kravitz Laboratory, HMS, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Research Opportunity to study the neuronal mechanisms underlying reproduction, Dr. Victor Navarro’s lab, BWH, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity, Cognitive Neuroscience Group (Dr. Yael Arbel), MGH, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Undergraduate research assistant, Dr. Aizenberg Lab, SEAS, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Chen Lab, Schepens Eye Research Institute, MEE/MGH, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Clinical Research Experience at the Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Institute at McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Undergraduate Research Assistant, Walsh Lab, Boston Children's Hospital, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Advancing coil design in micromagnetic stimulation, Dr. Bonmassar Lab, AA. Martinos Center Department of Radiology Harvard Medical School Massachusetts General Hospital, Posted Sep 4, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in 3D Bioprinting, Prof. Jennifer Lewis’ Lab, Harvard University, Posted Sep 3, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity in Cancer Biology with the Letai Laboratory, Posted Sep 3, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity with the Stroke research, HSPH, Posted Sep 3, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Hodi Lab, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Posted Sep 3, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Schulman Lab, BIDMC, Posted Sep 3, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity at Spaulding Hospital Cambridge INSPIRE Lab for sensorimotor rehabilitation engineering, Posted Sep 3, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Laboratory of Dr. Leo A. Kim, Mass. Eye and Ear/HMS, Posted Sep 3, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Miller’s Lab, MEEI, Posted Sep 3, 2019

Research Assistant: Genetics and Molecular Biology of Brain Tumors, Badr lab, MGH, Posted Sep 3, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunities in climate dynamics, SEAS, Posted Sep 3, 2019

Computational epigenomics Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Shi Lab, Boston Children’s Hospital, Posted Sep 3, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Brain Aging and Dementia Laboratory, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH), Posted Sep 3, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Sabina Berretta Lab (Translational Neuroscience Lab., McLean Hospital), Posted Sep 3, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunities in Astrophysics, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Posted Aug 29, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Ghebremichael Lab, Ragon Institute of MGH, Harvard, MIT, Posted Aug 29, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity in Dr. Ionescu lab in Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Posted Aug 29, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, McLean Geriatric Psychiatry Research Program, McLean Hospital, Posted Aug 29, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Professor Fishman Lab, Harvard Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology Department, Posted Aug 29, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity at the Histology Lab, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Posted Aug 29, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Shivdasani Lab, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Posted Aug 29, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Lois Choi-Kain’s Lab, McLean Hospital, Posted Aug 29, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. White Lab, MGH East – CNY, Posted Aug 29, 2019

Research Assistant/Student Programmer, The Speech and Feeding Disorder Lab (Dr. Jordan Green), MGH Institute of Health Professions, Posted Aug 23, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity at the Laboratory for Computational Neuroimaging, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH, Posted Aug 23, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in studying role of lncRNAs in bone marrow failure and oncogenesis (Novina Lab), Posted Aug 16, 2019

Undergraduate research volunteer in Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders Lab, Posted Aug 8, 2019

Undergraduate opportunity, Deep learning in MGH Cardiovascular Imaging, Dr. Lu, Posted Aug 8, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Institute, McLean Hospital, Posted Aug 8, 2019

Undergraduate research in cell- and ionic liquid-based drug delivery, Mitragotri Lab, SEAS, Posted July 17, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity in hydrogel-based drug delivery, Mitragotri Lab, Posted June 17, 2019

 

2018-2019 Academic Year

Research Opportunity to study the neuronal mechanisms underlying reproduction and metabolism, Dr. Victor Navarro’s lab, BWH, Posted April 23, 2019

Research Assistant, Dr. Pepperberg’s Lab, Harvard University, Posted April 15, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity at the Laboratory for Computational Neuroimaging, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH, Posted April 2, 2019

Undergraduate summer research internship, Cognitive Neuroscience Group, MGH, Posted March 27, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Division of Genetics, Posted March 8 2019

Undergraduate Research Position, Pediatrics and Neuroscience, Lurie Center for Autism, MGH for Children, Posted March 8, 2019

Haplotype-aware de novo assembly of related individuals, G. Church Lab, Posted Feb 21, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity at Spaulding Hospital Cambridge INSPIRE Lab for sensorimotor rehabilitation engineering (term-time, summer, or both), Posted Feb 21, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity in oral delivery of biological drugs, Mitragotri Lab at Northwestern Building, Posted Feb 7, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity at Wyss Institute, Posted Feb 7, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity in 3D bacterial motility, Rowland Institute, Posted Feb 7, 2019

Undergraduate research, Arnold Lab, MGH, Charlestown Navy Yard, Posted Jan 29, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity in diabetes and obesity project at Mitragotri Lab at Northwest Building in Cambridge, Posted Jan 29, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity on developing breakthrough technologies to promote effective science communication in biomedical research, MEEI, Posted Jan 28, 2019

Research Assistant Positions in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience – Spring Term 2019, Posted Jan 2, 2019

 

 

Sep 23, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Sang Park, BCH

Contact information:   PI name: Sang Park, Department: Pediatrics, Location: 3 Blackfan Circle, Boston, MA 02115 

Contact information: sangwon.park@childrens.harvard.edu    Lab website: parklab.info

Project description and duties:

Skills required: Power point, Excel, and Adobe Illustrator.

Learning outcomes: Students will learn how to analyze western blot and qPCR data, how to present their data, and how to write a scientific journal/grant.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if these are negotiable, state so. Some students may choose to take summer courses, so perhaps flexibility in this area will result in more students applying): A minimum of one-year commitment would be good, but it is negotiable. 

Mentoring: PI and other lab members will be mentoring. PI will be providing mentorship through zoom meetings on a weekly- or bi-weekly basis. Other lab members will be providing mentorship as needed (most likely, more frequently than once a week). Students can attend research group zoom meetings. 

Student stipend: The position will be paid $15/hour. 

Application information: Detail the information students need to submit and the contact information for submitting this information: Email your resume to Dr. Park at sangwon.park@childrens.harvard.edu​ 

 

 

Sep 16, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Thoracic Surgery Research at Dr. Yang’s lab, MGH/HMS

Contact information: Dr. Chi-Fu Jeffrey Yang, Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital.  cjyang@mgh.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: Our program is an opportunity to work with physicians and medical students on cutting-edge clinical surgical research.  In addition, we will teach students how to raise awareness about lung cancer screening in the community.  Our program is meant to be more than an assistantship: this is a unique opportunity to work directly alongside talented physicians and researchers in the field.  We want to develop your research and leadership skills and allow you the opportunity to create and lead innovation that may potentially improve the lives of patients.

Responsibilities include:

• Learning how to perform clinical research in thoracic oncology with physicians and medical students 

• Collaborating with team members to raise awareness about lung cancer screening

• Programs development

 Skills required:

• Proficiency with Microsoft Word, Excel, and Outlook. Familiarity with statistical programs such as R or STATA are a plus but not required.  Video-editing and familiarity with web design are a plus, but not required

• Commitment to research and public service

• Previous leadership experience and demonstrated individual initiative are key criteria that will be considered when reviewing applicants for this position

Learning outcomes: By the end of their training, the trainee should be able to:

1.         Learn how to perform cutting-edge clinical research in thoracic surgery

2.         Read papers in any major medical journal and understand the strengths and weaknesses of the study

3.         Be fluent in medical vocabulary and understand the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer

4.         Learn how to effectively engage with the public to raise awareness about lung cancer

5.         If warranted based on their contributions, students will be co-authors on scientific manuscripts.

 

Number of hours: The project will require at least 8-10 hours/week of commitment.  At the same time, we recognize that students have many commitments, including studying for finals and spending time with family and friends, and we will work around the student’s schedule to make this a fun and engaging learning experience.

 

Mentoring: Dr. Yang is a thoracic surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital.  He graduated from Harvard College and Harvard Medical School.  He lived in Matthews as a first-year and then Leverett House.  He has over 7 years of experience teaching and mentoring undergraduate students, many of whom are now in medical school.  He has built a team that cares deeply about the undergraduate research experience and really wants to help students achieve their dreams. 

These are his publications: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/chi-fu.yang.1/bibliography/public/

Student stipend: Volunteer position. The Laboratory does not have funds to pay student stipends, but students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships (https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities)

 

Application information: Please e-mail your resume/CV along with a cover letter including a brief outline of your interests, goals, and anticipated time availability

to Dr. Chi-Fu Jeffrey Yang at cjyang@mgh.harvard.edu

 

Sep 3, 2020

Research Assistant, Demehri Laboratory, Center for Cancer Immunology, Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School

Full time research assistant position is available immediately in our laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School to study the mechanisms of immune regulation of early cancer development and the role alarmins and commensal viruses in this process. The position is ideal for a recent graduate planning to work for couple of years in research before entering graduate or medical school. Besides bench research, applicant will have the opportunity to learn about clinical care for patients with severe skin cancers and skin-related adverse effects of cancer immunotherapies. Attention to detail, high motivation, and effective communication skills are essential. Knowledge in immunological, molecular, and mice experimentations are considered important for this position.

Visit our laboratory website for more detail:

http://massgeneral.link/DemeheriLab

Please email a cover letter and CV to Dr. Shawn Demehri:

sdemehri1@mgh.harvard.edu
 

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Radiation Physics and Instrumentation Lab, MGH

Contact information:   PI: Hamid Sabet, Ass. Prof. HSabet@mgh.harvard.edu

Additional contact: Lisa Bläckberg, Instructor. LBlackberg@mgh.harvard.edu

Radiation Physics and Instrumentation Laboratory, Gordon Center for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, MGH.

Lab website: https://scholar.harvard.edu/sabet

 

Project description and duties:

In our imaging instrumentation lab, we focus on developing high-performance and advanced radiation based medical imaging systems. This is done by rigorously studying and addressing some of the fundamental limitations and obstacles of today’s imaging systems.

We have several ongoing projects including the development of a high performance Cardiac dedicated Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) system, development of a Brain dedicated Position Emission Tomography System as well as an intraoperative probe-based imaging system.

In all these areas we are combining innovation on the system level design with developments of individual radiation detectors to meet the requirements of a given application.

In addition to the mentioned projects we are continuously exploring new ideas in order to address current shortcomings and limitations in the field.

While a large portion of our work is experimental in nature, there are also several areas of our research that can be done remotely. We perform a number of different types of simulation studies for system and detector optimization, as well as GPU programming and machine learning. Additional work currently done remotely are image reconstruction and supporting tasks such as mechanical drawings.

The specific tasks of a remote undergraduate student would largely depend on the interest and skills of the student and could involve for example programming tasks, data analysis, mechanical drawings, simulations, experimental design and documentation.

Skills required:

Other than logical thinking and enthusiasm, no other skill is required! Computer programming in MATLAB, LabVIEW, Python, etc is a plus. Students will learn all the necessary skills while participating in the work in our lab.

 

Learning outcomes:

A student in our lab would have the opportunity to learn about the medical imaging field and contribute to our research while expanding their skill set. The student would get a general knowledge of different medical imaging systems and their requirements as well as basic understanding on how radiation detection works.

Specific skills would depend on the tasks taken on by the student but could include data analysis methods, basic programming, visual presentation of scientific data and scientific writing.

 

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project:

The number of hours per week is flexible (up to 15-20 hours weekly). Project length is also flexible as project type and length can be tuned based on the student.

 

Mentoring:

The student will be mentored by current lab members. Zoom meetings will be done as often as needed, but minimally once per week. The student can also attend the weekly lab meeting held over zoom.

 

Student stipend:

This is a volunteer position

 

Application information:

If interested please send a CV to either Hamid Sabet (HSabet@mgh@harvard.edu) or Lisa Bläckberg (LBlackberg@mgh.harvard.edu)

 

Aug 31, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Computational Parasite Genomics, Neafsey Lab, Broad Institute/HSPH

Contact information: Dr. Angela Early (early@broadinstitute.org), Neafsey Lab, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, HSPH, https://sites.sph.harvard.edu/neafsey-lab/

Project description and duties: Our lab uses computational methods to study the genomes of Plasmodium parasites, the causative agents of malaria. We are particularly interested in understanding how Plasmodium genomes are evolving to increase survival in the face of drugs and host immune responses. Our ability to make these discoveries, however, relies on differentiating true biological signal from various sources of error (or “noise”). We are looking for an undergraduate to assess how model parameter choice affects the analysis outcome of several population genetic tools. You will be trained in using the tools and then run them independently on multiple data sets using different parameter sets. You will then learn the appropriate statistical tests for ascertaining whether the different input parameters significantly change the final analysis results. With this study, we aim to establish “best practices” for both our group and the larger malaria research community.

Skills required: Some programming experience and a basic knowledge of genetics (eg, AP Biology or Life Sciences 1B). This project will involve command line scripting, python, and R. Direct experience with all these languages is not necessary, but you should feel comfortable independently reading and editing code (with the help of Google, of course!)

Learning outcomes: In the first semester, you will learn to run relevant population genetics software and discuss the basics of experimental design. If continuing for a second semester, you will make and test a hypothesis, independently analyze data, and present your findings in a short oral presentation.

Number of hours: Minimum of 5 hours per week.

Mentoring: Depending on the number of hours worked, the student will meet once or twice a week with Dr. Angela Early. If desired, students can also attend weekly group meetings to learn about other research projects in the Neafsey Lab.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position, but we will support applications for HCRP stipends.

Application information: If you are interested in speaking further about the project, please email your resume to Angela Early (early@broadinstitute.org).

 

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Evolution of Drug Resistance, Neafsey Lab, Broad Institute/HSPH

Contact information: Dr. Angela Early (early@broadinstitute.org), Neafsey Lab, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, HSPH, https://sites.sph.harvard.edu/neafsey-lab/

Project description and duties: Research in the Neafsey Group aims to understand the evolutionary processes through which Plasmodium parasites—the causative agents of malaria—acquire drug resistance. In this project, we are interested in expanding the usual focus. Instead of considering only malaria drugs, we will additionally investigate whether drugs intended to treat bacterial or other parasitic infections also impose selection on Plasmodium. In other words, are Plasmodium parasites developing resistance not only to anti-malarial treatments but also to commonly used antibiotics? If so, could this hamper the development of future novel malaria treatments? This project is brand new, and so we are looking for an engaged undergraduate to help with the initial literature review. This literature review will gather information on (1) the main drugs used (both officially and unofficially) in a subset of key malaria-endemic countries and (2) the cellular targets of these drugs. If continuing on with the project, the student will then use computational and statistical approaches to investigate whether the Plasmodium version of these drug targets appear to be adapting to patterns of regional drug use.

Skills required: No prior experience is required

Learning outcomes: In the first semester, you will learn to conduct a thorough scientific literature review that will culminate in giving a brief oral presentation. If continuing for a second semester, you will learn to perform data analysis and statistical testing to look for correlations between drug usage and genetic markers.

Number of hours: Minimum of 5 hours per week.

Mentoring: Depending on the number of hours worked, the student will meet once or twice a week with Dr. Angela Early and will have the opportunity to attend weekly group meetings.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position, but we will support applications for HCRP stipends.

Application information: If you are interested in speaking further about the project, please email your resume to Angela Early (early@broadinstitute.org) to set up a time for a Zoom call.

 

 

Aug 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Cancer Genomics at Dr. Kwiatkowski lab, BWH/HMS

Contact information: Dr. David Kwiatkowski and Dr. Krinio Giannikou, Cancer Genetics Laboratory, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School,  20 Shattuck street, Thorn Research Building, Room 826, http://www.kwiatkowskilab.org/, e-mail: dk@rics.bwh.harvard.edu and kgiannikou@bwh.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: Professor David Kwiatkowski, has an established and acclaimed academic career in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) disease research field. His research group identified the TSC1 gene in 1997 and has pursued numerous studies exploring human molecular genetics of TSC, biological and signaling pathways and therapeutic approaches for TSC tumors. They have generated multiple mouse models of TSC as well as cell line models that are used broadly. His lab has a specific interest in mosaicism in TSC, and the pathogenesis of all of the tumors that occur in this disease. Dr Kwiatkowski is a leader of several clinical trials for TSC, LAM disease and Perivascular Epithelioid malignant tumor (PEComas) with metastatic potential.

Some publications relevant to the research topics covered in the lab:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31506280/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31160751/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27494029/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30593515/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31000673/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32060062/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22456611/

The trainee will get exposure to translational research in the field of TSC and malignant PEComas with the ultimate goal to understand the genetics and transcriptomics of these rare diseases:

  1. Learn how to analyze whole exome sequencing data from tumor samples
  2. Annotate mutations using the Standard Mutation Nomenclature and assess functional significance of genetic variants using in silico prediction tools.
  3. Visualize exome data with graphs and plots-Correlate molecular findings with the clinical data using Graphpad Prism
  4. Perform differential gene expression analysis on whole transcriptome RNA-seq data using Qlucore, Cistrome toolkit and others.
  5. Perform pathway and network analyses on RNA-seq output data using GSEA, DAVID, and other available tools.

Trainees should participate in at least one relevant course or seminar per week in support of their training goals. Courses and seminars are widely available throughout BWH, Harvard Medical School and Catalyst. Offerings and schedules may be found online at:

BWH Research Intranet: http://bwhbri.partners.org

BWH Events Calendar: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/view/viewEvents.aspx?audience=1

Catalyst: http://catalyst.harvard.edu/learning.html
Harvard Medical School: http://itwwebs.med.harvard.edu/EventsCal/ASP-HTML/index.asp

 

Skills required: Previous knowledge in statistical analysis, R code and other computational language is desirable.

Learning outcomes: By the end of their training, the trainee should be able to:

  1. Critically analyze results and understand scientific papers related to our research work
  2. Interpret and present scientific data in an efficient way
  3. Learn to effectively work with other colleagues in a team-based approach.

The trainee will present their findings and analysis at least one laboratory meeting at the end of their training period. If warranted based on their contributions, students will be co-authors on scientific manuscripts.

Number of hours: The project will require at least 4-6 hours/week of commitment, but since it is a remote research training, the number of hours can be much more than that, dependent on the initiative of the student.  This is not a make work project. However, the student can organize their time according to their school schedule.

Mentoring:  Dr. Krinio Giannikou from the Kwiatkowski lab will be the direct supervisor and mentor of the student. Dr. Giannikou will teach, guide and advise the student. She will e-meet with them weekly or as much as needed to discuss the work in progress. Also, she will keep regular contact with them through e-mails.  The student will also have meetings with Dr. Kiatkowski, and attend weekly lab meetings and journal clubs and will have opportunities to present at the lab meetings and journal clubs. The trainee will be encouraged to discuss their findings with other members from Kwiatkowski lab during remote weekly lab meetings.

Student stipend: Volunteer position. The Laboratory does not have funds to pay student stipends, but students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships (https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities)

Application information: Please e-mail your resume/CV along with a cover letter including a brief outline of your interests, goals, and anticipated time availability

to Dr. Kwiatkowski dk@rics.bwh.harvard.edu  and Dr. Giannikou kgiannikou@bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Tropical Forest Ecology, Dr. Moorcroft Lab, OEB

Contact information: Dr. Paul Moorcroft, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, paul_moorcroft@harvard.edu, Museum of Natural History, Suite 43 (currently working remotely), http://moorcroftlab.oeb.harvard.edu/home

Project description and duties:

Large trees are disproportionately important players in global ecosystems, accounting for the majority of carbon storage in a forest stand. Recently, the tallest trees in the tropics were found to occur in Malaysian Borneo. Understanding how these trees function is critical for understanding how they will respond to future global change. The student will contribute to an ongoing research project evaluating characteristics of emergent (large canopy) trees and tree species in Southeast Asian tropical rainforests. Responsibilities will include data cleaning and organizing in R, analyzing tree census data from several tropical forest sites in Malaysian Borneo to calculate diversity, and growth and mortality rates, and conducting statistical analyses. In addition to data analysis, the student will also learn how to create publication-quality figures. Opportunities also exist for working with LiDAR and imaging spectroscopy airborne remote sensing data if the student is interested. These activities will be closely guided and supported by Dr. Elsa Ordway via regular meetings.

Skills required:

- Experience with R is highly desirable.

- Prior use of ArcGIS preferred but not necessary.

Learning outcomes: scientific research skills including: study design, data analysis, science presentations, and scientific writing.

- Data analysis skills: statistical analyses of plant demography and diversity, analysis of airborne remote sensing data

- Data visualization skills

- Co-authorship on a scientific peer-reviewed paper

Number of hours students are expected to work and duration of the project:

- 10-15 hours/week

- length of project – 1 semester with possible opportunities to become involved in additional projects after the completion of this project

Mentoring:

The student will be mentioned by Dr. Elsa Ordway (Postdoctoral Researcher) in the group and will meet with the mentor via Zoom meetings 1-3 times per week as needed. Periodic (approximately bi-weekly) meetings with Dr. Ordway and Prof. Moorcroft. The student is also welcome to attend weekly lab group meetings / talks and frequently meet with PI to present project updates.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position, but students are encouraged to apply for internal Harvard and outside fellowships.

Application information: Email your resume and a short paragraph describing why you’re interested in this research opportunity to Dr. Elsa Ordway at elsa_ordway@fas.harvard.edu.

 

 

 

Aug 26, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational and Systems Biology at Zomorrodi Lab, HMS

Contact information:

Ali R. Zomorrodi

Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center

Massachusetts General Hospital for Children

44 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114

E-mail: azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu

Zomorrodi lab website

Project description and duties:

Zomorrodi lab integrates biological networks, mathematical/statistical/physical models and engineering tools to develop computational mechanistic models of the microbiome and the host. These models are used to advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and to streamline the design of personalized treatments.

Multiple projects that can be entirely performed remotely are available in the following areas:

  1. Reconstruction of metabolic and genetic network models for human cell lines
  2. Computational assessment of the effect of metabolites produced by the gut microbiota on the host metabolic and immune systems by using cell-specific metabolic networks.
  3. Analysis of microbiomic data using statistical methods and machine learning.
  4. Exploring the effect of spatial structure on the equilibrium state of microbial communities by integrating game theory, metabolic networks and physical models.

Skills required:

Having a keen interest in computational research is the only requirement and

no mathematical or programming skills are needed for most projects. For students who are particularly interested in computational modeling or computer programming there are ample opportunities to tailor the projects toward their interests.

Learning outcomes:

Students will learn how computational simulations and biological network models can be used to address translational problems. More broadly, students gain experience in essential research skills including data analysis, interpretation of results, presentations, and scientific writing.

Time commitment:

Negotiable. The PI is flexible to accommodate students’ schedules or other time demands. These projects are intended for the duration of the Fall and can be extended into Spring and beyond upon mutual interest.

Mentoring:

Students will be directly mentored by Dr. Zomorrodi and have the opportunity to remotely interact with other lab members and attend group meetings. Mentorship zoom meetings are held once a week on a regular basis. 

Student stipend:

This is a volunteer research position. Students are encouraged to apply for undergraduate research fellowships such as HCRP or to register for a research course credit.

Application information:

Interested candidates should email a CV to Dr. Zomorrodi at azomorrodi@mgh.harvard.edu and briefly explain what their interests are. Please use “Fall 2020 Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunities” as the subject of your email.

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Industrial Robot, Biorobotics Lab, Harvard SEAS

Contact information: PI: Rob Howe. Contact: Zeo Liu zixiliu@g.harvard.edu http://biorobotics.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

Dancing with an Industrial Robot

Dr. Merritt Moore is a ballerina and scientist who seeks to bring science & technology and arts together. (https://physicsonpointe.com/) One of her current projects is dancing with an industrial robot (UR-10 from Universal Robots). Here we list a few potential technology focused student projects that contribute in bringing new ways to explore this concept of “dancing with an industrial robot” that are also appropriate for remote work given limited access to hardware due to COVID-19 pandemic. Please note that student ideas are also welcome. The student will be working with Dr. Moore on the performance side and the Biorobotics Lab on the robotics side of the project.

  1. Real-time motion tracking through a high frame rate camera: This project involves developing a task specific (tracking the motion of the dancer) algorithm that operates in real time (minimal latency) to provide information for guiding robot motion. The student will be working with dance footages with the possibility of acquiring a high frame rate camera for demo. The student can evaluate the performance of the overall result with the exact robot through simulation.

Recommended background:

Any of the following: computer vision, image processing, machine learning, software engineering, robotics (for simulation)

  1. Real-time motion tracking through a relatively low cost commercial motion capture systems: In this project, the student is to evaluate existing commercial motion capture systems, identify one that’s within budget and develop a real-time pipeline that provides tracking of the dancer with minimal latency for guiding robot motion. This project has multiple layers as the student works to integrate the system of the motion capture system, explore novel techniques to decrease latency and interpolate with intelligence to push for further performance. The student can evaluate the performance of the overall result with the exact robot through simulation.

Recommended background:

Any of the following: robotics (frames and poses), signal processing, machine learning

  1. Develop novel controls for elaborate end effector (such as ribbons, water fountain, lights, robot hands, walls, screens (for projection)): In this project we explore different ways to add to the performance via interesting attachment to the end effector of the robot. Listed in the title are a few options but we’re open to new ideas in any creative way. Students can pick one to focus or evaluate a few options as appropriate. There are many aspects of this project depending on the choice of the end effector attachment. For instance, modeling the trajectory of the ribbon is a complex task because it is made of soft material, and its motion is affected by not only the end effector’s motion but also environmental factors such as air flow. The student can also choose to combine a few elements to push the limit of visual effect. For instance, one of the famous science museum exhibitions uses lighting and water drops where by changing the frequency of the light, the water drop could appear going upwards. The student can choose to focus on theoretical development, modeling, experimental exploration, or system integration. This work is projected to take place in simulation but hardware setup for validation that’s appropriate for remote work can also be considered.

Recommended background:

Any of the following: signals and systems, robotics, fluid dynamics, acoustics, modeling of soft material, finite element analysis, optimization

  1. Creative and interactive camera view: In this project we have the robot hold a camera while interacting with the dancer. The camera view is projected to a screen at the performance. The specification of this project is open-ended. Here we ask the question: how should the robot move with respect to the dancer to show interesting angles? Where should the robot go to respond to the dancer? By combining choreography and spontaneous motion through visual feedback, can we introduce new elements to this performance? This project is projected to take place in simulation but a combination of simulation and a physical camera (or even a miniature robot) is a possibility, budget allowing.

There are a few interesting potential aspects to this project in addition to the artistic side including but limited to the control of the robot through kinematics, understanding what the camera sees through real-time computer vision, exploring artistic way of setting a scene through machine learning, and in case of using a camera, integrating with the camera so that one can get the video stream and change the settings dynamically (zooming focusing etc)

Any of the following: robotics, computer vision, image processing, machine learning

Learning outcomes: research experience in robotics/computer vision/machine learning/software engineering

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: negotiable

Mentoring: Mentoring will be provided by PI and a graduate student in the bio robotics lab. Mentorship meetings are flexible but at least once every two weeks. The student is welcome to attend group meetings.

Student stipend: The student is encouraged to apply for undergraduate research funding: https://uraf.harvard.edu/research-funding

Application information: Please email your resume to zixiliu@g.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Biorobotics Lab, Harvard SEAS

Contact information: PI: Rob Howe. Contact: Zeo Liu zixiliu@g.harvard.edu http://biorobotics.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties:

Computer Vision for An Autonomous Poop-Picking Robot for a Service Dog Facility

Facilities such as the service dog project at Ipswich, Massachusetts are always in need for volunteers to help pick up poop from the puppies and adult dogs that are raised and trained to help people with mobility issues. Poop-picking is an important job however unexciting it may seem. The long term goal of is to build an autonomous robot/drone that tackles this task so that the human volunteers at this facility can focus on the interactions with the dogs. At this facility, there are webcams that streams live 24/7 (such as https://explore.org/livecams/service-dog-project/great-danes-service-puppies-puppy-hill).

The particular aim of this project is to develop computer vision algorithms to automatically detect the action of a dog pooping by running real-time image analysis of the webcams, estimate the location of the poop so that a robot can be sent out for retrieval. Another aspect of this project is processing the image from a camera that is attached to the robot to locate the poop on board of a robot in real time. Note that the major difference is that now the camera is moving and we may be working with visual occlusion when parts of the robot could be blocking the view.

This project has many exciting engineering layers that include but is not limited to image processing, machine learning (likely a convolutional neural network to detect pooping posture), real-time processing, embedded image processing, system integration (pull images from the webcam), and user interface. The student may choose to focus on whichever aspect they find exciting.

Necessary Background:

Any of the below:

- Machine learning experience

- Image processing experience

- Embedded systems

Learning outcomes: research experience in computer vision/machine learning/software engineering

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: negotiable

Mentoring: Mentoring will be provided by PI and a graduate student in the bio robotics lab. Mentorship meetings are flexible but at least once every two weeks. The student is welcome to attend group meetings.

Student stipend: The student is encouraged to apply for undergraduate research funding: https://uraf.harvard.edu/research-funding

Application information: Please email your resume to zixiliu@g.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Synho Do, Ph.D., Laboratory of Medical Imaging and Computation, Department of Radiology, MGH

Contact information:

Synho Do, MS, Ph.D. (sdo@mgh.harvard.edu)

Director, Laboratory of Medical Imaging and Computation

Assistant Medical Director, Advanced Health Technology Engineering, Research, and Development, MGPO, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School

Project description and duties:

We are seeking undergraduate students for projects related to the development of Artificial Intelligence for medical imaging. There are three projects offered, all of them are related to AI (Artificial Intelligence) analysis tools developed for medical images.

A.     Capsule endoscopy

Capsule endoscopy (CE) is a non-invasive, specialized tool used to explore the digestive tract. It shoots an 8 to 12 hour-long video as it passes through the small bowel and produces more than 100,000 images per case. It provides plenty of information that cannot be obtained by other medical tools, but it takes more than an hour to review the video by expert physicians and may miss important information in the process.

We are developing a Computer-Aided Diagnosis tool for capsule endoscopy using machine learning. For this, we have a few sub-projects regarding identifying digestive organs, distinguishing normal structures from abnormal lesions, and estimating quality of bowel preparation, etc. Students will be involved in developing frame processing, feature extraction, and/or classification algorithms.

B.     CXR (Chest X-ray Radiography)

Despite the wide variety of findings that can be seen in a chest radiograph, most algorithms for automated classification of chest radiographs are limited in their number of findings. To solve this effectively, we developed the convolutional neural network (CNN) models by all visual findings extracted from our natural language processing (NLP) algorithm, MGH CXR data, and reports. The further works are related to improving performance and explainability of our AI model as follows:

  • Developing an automatic image-based iterative method for isolating noisy labels on Chest X-ray
  • Developing new visualization methods for highly explainable AI models
  • Developing new keywords generation methods for explainable AI models

C.     NLP (Natural Language Processing)

NLP is a part of artificial intelligence, and the goal is making an interface for computers to interpret and understand human language. NLP technology is already in our lives through Apple Siri, Amazon Alexa, or Google translator, and it will also be important for processing medical records. By using NLP, we can make apps for diagnostic aids, or more easily collect large volumes of data for other AI learning.

One of our current NLP projects is to make a program that automatically extracts disease or its characteristics from chest X-ray reports composed of huge amounts of sentences. The final goal is to identify the statistical characteristics of chest X-ray reports and create a database for developing other AI Students will be involved to make basic data for NLP training, train AI network, and improve the performance of NLP programs.

Skills required:

  • Knowledge of deep learning neural networks
  • Experience in frameworks such as PyTorch (preferred), TensorFlow, Keras etc.
  • Proficiency in programming in Python 

Learning outcomes:

Students can develop skills while working with cutting edge machine learning technologies.

Students develop academic communication skills in preparation for graduate study and academic career.

The goal of this project is to submit an academic paper to a peer-reviewed journal or conference.

Expectations: The student would be expected to spend 10-15 hrs./week on this project for more than one semester.  There is, however, flexibility in the schedule that can be discussed between the applicant and the PI.

Mentoring: Students will be co-mentored by PI Dr. Do and his Post Doctoral research fellows in the group and meet the mentor 1-2 times per week via Microsoft team meetings. Students will be invited to the group’s Microsoft Teams channel where they can connect with other members of the group. Students can also attend weekly lab meetings (on Mondays) and frequently meet with Dr. Do to present project updates.

Student stipend: This position is non-paid. However, our previous interns have received a fellowship for their research with our support and help. 

Application informationPlease send your resume and a brief description of your interest in via email to prof. Synho Do, Ph.D. (sdo@mgh.harvard.edu) and Joowon Chung, MD, Ph.D. (jwchung@mgh.harvard.edu).

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Krichevsky Lab, BWH

Contact information: Dr. Anna Krichevsky, Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases, Neurology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School

Email address: akrichevsky@bwh.harvard.edu

Lab website: https://krichevskylab.bwh.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: Our laboratory focuses on regulatory RNA molecules, such as microRNAs and lncRNAs, their role in brain tumors and neurodegenerative diseases, and potential as novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers. We are also interested in the RNA-mediated intracellular communication between brain tumors and normal cells of their microenvironment. Our overall goal is to develop basic RNA research toward a cure for glioblastoma (GBM), other brain tumors, and neurodegeneration. We recently performed a large screen and collected a dataset of small molecule compounds modulating the expression of various microRNAs in human iPSC-derived neurons. We are seeking a student who will help with exploring and analyzing the dataset, as well as generating novel hypotheses to be tested in cellular and animal models of neurologic diseases.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required, though a general interest in molecular biology and neuroscience is preferred. Background in computational data analysis and/or statistics would be beneficial. Applications from new undergraduate researchers are encouraged.

Learning outcomes: Prospective student is expected to acquire fundamental research skills including reading and understanding the scientific literature, analyzing data, designing new experiments, and scientific writing and presentation.

Number of hours students are expected to work: At least 8 hours per week, but can be flexible.

Mentoring: Student will be mentored remotely through zoom by a postdoctoral fellow and PI on a weekly basis. The student is also welcomed to attend research group zoom meetings.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position. Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships. Assistance may be provided for fellowship applications.

Application information: Interested students should send short email including a statement of academic background and research interest (less than 400 words), resume or CV, and transcript to Dr. Krichevsky.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, Department of Statistics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

Contact information: Marie-Abele Bind, Department of Statistics, Science Center, Room 608, https://scholar.harvard.edu/marie-abele

Project description and duties: Development or applications of causal inference methods and software for quantifying the effects of randomized or non-randomized exposures (e.g., air pollution, temperature) on outcomes (e.g., fatal accident, crime, mortality).

Skills required: No prior research experience required. New undergraduate researchers and candidates with basic understanding of probability and statistics, and with some experience in R programming are encouraged to apply.

Learning outcomes: R programming skills, research skills such as study design for causal inference in randomized and non-randomized studies, statistical analysis methods (Fisherian, Neymanian, and Bayesian inference), presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Negotiable. Ideally, students are expected to work 5 to 10 hours a week. Length of the project: one semester.

Mentoring: Dr. Bind will be mentoring the undergraduate with the help of Dr. Young Lee (Post-doc). Weekly or bi-weekly mentorship meetings. Students are encouraged to attend group meetings.

Student stipend: Unpaid position. Students are encourage to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities.

Course credit: Students can conduct research for course credit.

Application information: Students should email their resume to Dr. Bind at ma.bind@mail.harvard.edu.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity with the Stroke microsimulation for Health outcomes and Interventions to Evaluate policies for Long-term Decision-making (SHIELD) Team, HSPH

Contact information: Ankur Pandya, Health Policy and Management (HSPH), anpandya@hsph.harvard.edu, 718 Huntington Ave 2nd floor (Longwood), https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/ankur-pandya/

Project description and duties: Stroke is a leading cause of death, disability, and healthcare costs in the United States. We are developing and applying the SHIELD model to quantify the key tradeoffs among health benefits, risks, and costs for any feasible stroke prevention or treatment policies. Example publications:

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2702211

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0148106

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2396476

All of the research for this project can be (and is currently being done) remotely (i.e., from home as opposed to on campus).

Skills required: No prior research experience is required. Familiarity with working with data, coding in R or C++, and literature reviews could help.

Learning outcomes: Public health research skills such as cost-effectiveness analysis and risk prediction modeling study design, in addition to essential research skills such as literature reviews and scientific manuscript/presentation preparation. Note we are not a wet lab nor do we conduct any research with human subjects -- instead, we work with secondary data and simulation modeling to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of stroke prevention and treatment policies.

Number of hours 5 hours/week for at least 2 semesters (summer included). 

Mentoring: The undergraduate will work closely with Dr. Pandya and Harvard PhD students on the project in addition to several academic physicians from Harvard Medical School and Weill Cornell Medical College who collaborate with the SHIELD modeling team. Student can attend weekly group research meetings (via Zoom), and have mentoring meetings 2-4 times per month with Dr. Pandya (via Zoom).

Student stipend: We can pay $15-20 per hour depending on tasks being performed. 

Course credit: No expected to be applicable unless circumstances call and allow for it.

Application information: Email your resume and a short statement of interest to Dr. Pandya at anpandya@hsph.harvard.edu

 

 

Jul 2, 2020

Remote or in person (depending on University policy) Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Elisabetta del Re, BIDMC

Contact information: Elisabetta_delre@hms.harvard.edu, BIDMC, Psychiatry
Project description
 and duties: 2 projects: 1. Genetics of hippocampus in psychosis; or 2. Genetic topography of the brain. For duties see learning outcomes

Skills required: No prior research experience is required

Learning outcomes: study design, data analysis methods, computer analyses of brain, literature review, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Flexible

Mentoring: Dr. del Re and an RA will supervise the student; Whether online or in person, the mentor will meet 2 times a week, 1 hr each meeting

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position.

Application information: Please email your resume to Elisabetta_delre@hms.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Cognitive Neuroscience Group (CNG), MGH

Contact information: Lauryn Zipse, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, lzipse@mghihp.edu, 617-643-3245

Project description and duties: The research intern will assist with development of an app-based assessment of cognitive and language function to track recovery after stroke.

Skills required: Programming experience required, preferably but not necessarily using Xcode.

Learning outcomes: The research intern will work with an interdisciplinary team based at MGH to learn about stroke recovery, evaluation of language and cognition, and tele-assessment.

Number of hours expected: The number of hours per week and duration of involvement are negotiable.

Mentoring: Dr. Lauryn Zipse will be the primary mentor. The research intern will have the opportunity to participate in team meetings, via Zoom, with an interdisciplinary team of medical professionals and researchers.

Student stipend: This is currently a volunteer position.

Application information: Email your resume and a cover letter/email to Dr. Lauryn Zipse at lzipse@mghihp.edu

 

May 18, 2020

Game Development and Motor Skills, Mahadevan Lab, SEAS

Contact information: Mahadevan , Cambridge,  https://www.seas.harvard.edu/softmat/

Project description and duties: Students will help in design and implementation of computer (and virtual reality) games to study motor skills in humans, including 3D drawing. 

Skills required: Experience with programming, some knowledge of statistics and desire to learn game development in the C# language and the Unity game engine. 

Learning outcomes: The student will acquire knowledge about human motor control and experience in game development as well as data processing and model building.

Number of hours: (20-40) hours. Depending on task completion, desired learning outcome and student's excitement about the project.

Mentoring: Weekly meeting, more as needed. Students allowed to attend research group meetings.

Stipend: Students are encouraged to apply for Harvard / outside fellowships.

Application Information: Email salem@seas.harvard.edu

 

 

May 13, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Computational Physics, Dept. of Physics

Dr. Anna Lappala, Department of Molecular Biology & MGH and Prof. Lakshminarayanan Mahadevan, Department of Physics).

Contact information: Anna Lappala (lappala@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu)

Project description and duties: The aim of this project is to develop a statistical mechanics model of entanglement in polymer networks using Molecular Dynamics simulations. The student will learn how to generate initial state configurations and run Molecular Dynamics simulations of coarse grained polymer networks on local machines and remote high performance computing clusters. They will also learn how to analyze data in Python and develop analytical skills to study complex soft matter systems. The student will write a report and present their results in a group meeting (guided by his mentor), as an informal exercise in writing articles and giving scientific talks.

Skills required: This project is ideal for students in Physics/Engineering. Previous coding experience in Python would be helpful. No previous experience in Molecular Dynamics simulations required.

Learning outcomes: The student will learn how to set up and analyze Molecular Dynamics simulations of coarse-grained polymer chain networks. They will also develop research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing. Undergraduate projects in previous years have resulted in publications (an example can be found by following the link below:

 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-40286-2.)

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: Flexible

Mentoring: Dr Anna Lappala will be mentoring the undergraduate over zoom regularly (daily 30 minute zoom meetings in the beginning, more flexible as the project progresses). The student can attend Professor Mahadevan’s group zoom meetings twice a week.

Student stipend: Stipend will be provided.

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Anna Lappala at (lappala@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu)

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Hirschhorn Lab, Boston Children's Hospital

Contact information: Joel Hirschhorn, Department of Endocrinology, Joel.Hirschhorn@childrens.harvard.edu, Boston Children's Hospital Center for Life Science building floor 16, https://www.joelhirschhornlab.org/

Project description and duties: Human genetics has the potential to uncover new disease biology and predict health outcomes. Genome-wide association studies have identified hundreds of thousands of genetic variants associated with human diseases and traits, but translating these associations to actionable biology is difficult. One approach is to consider the associated variants in combination, to create individualized genetic predictors called polygenic risk scores (PRS). A major unmet challenge is that prediction using PRS is less accurate when predicting in populations of non-European ancestries, leading to health disparities in the application of genomic medicine to the clinic, and missed opportunities in studying the impact of genetic variation across populations. This project aims to use data from multiple populations to understand the reasons why PRS do not transfer well across ancestries, and to develop methods to improve their transferability and their ability to provide insights into biology across ancestry. The project will use anthropometric traits (human height and obesity) to address these questions. A strong background in computational skills, human/population genetics or (ideally) both will help the applicant be successful in this project.
Student will be expected to create PRS models using large datasets and evaluate results.

Skills required: Computer Science and Biology background; preferably experience with Python or R, unix, and an interest in human genetics. 

Learning outcomes: general research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing, as well as hands-on experience working with large human genetics datasets.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: negotiable, between 8-40 hours/wk. At least summer, but extended duration negotiable.

Mentoring: regular (daily-weekly) meetings with graduate advisor, regular (1 per 2 weeks) meetings with PI and graduate advisor. Student is encouraged to attend lab meetings and present on work.

Student stipend: Stipend is available at standard Boston Children’s rates; students seeking a stipend are strongly encouraged to apply for any applicable summer research fellowships. Course credit: Students can also conduct research for course credit (however, a student cannot earn course credit and be paid a stipend in the same semester).

Application information: Email your resume to Dr. Joel Hirschhorn at Joel.Hirschhorn@childrens.harvard.edu

 

Posted May 6, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Prof. Mahadevan/Prof. Nagpal Lab, SEAS

Contact information: Nagpal/Mahadevan, SEAS, nagpal@g.harvard.edu/ lmahadev@g.harvard.edu, Cambridge, MA [https://ssr.seas.harvard.edu/   /  https://www.seas.harvard.edu/softmat/ ]

Project description and duties: 

The North American beaver acts as a geomorphic agent by modifying the landscape over considerable spatial and temporal scales.  To study habitat modification by beaver, drones were used to generate high resolution maps of beaver habitats.  This project will focus on annotating features in the beaver’s environment using ArcMap.  Annotate maps using ArcGIS for features created by beaver.

Skills required: ArcGIS experience

Learning outcomes: ArcGIS experience, R language coding skills, Python language coding skills, data analysis, research communication/presentation

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if these are negotiable, state so. Some students may choose to take summer courses, so perhaps flexibility in this area will result in more students applying)  20 - 40 hr/week  (Task base completion)

Mentoring: Jordan Kennedy, Graduate student

How often are mentorship zoom meetings - weekly,  and can the student attend research group zoom meetings: yes

Student stipend: $5000/10 weeks 

Application information: email jokennedy@g.harvard.edu

 

 

Posted May 4, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity: Machine Learning & Applied Physics, Mahadevan Lab, SEAS

Contact information: Prof. L. Mahadevan  lmahadev@g.harvard.edu  
SEAS, Harvard University https://www.seas.harvard.edu/softmat/

Project description: Complex dynamical systems widely exist in nature, especially in biological systems. These systems stem from simple physical principles but exhibit rich patterns at various spatial and temporal scales. Due to their complexity, solving the exact dynamics and control problem from bottom-up mathematical modeling remains a challenging task. Recently, there has been a huge technological advance in the field of machine learning (especially deep learning and reinforcement learning) that has empowered a top-down approach for scientific studies. In this project, we explore ways in which machine learning can help us understand the basic scientific principles underlying complex dynamical systems.

Duties:

1. Build a simulator that simulates the dynamics and control problem in a selected scientific domain of interest. Students will have the freedom to choose a domain of their own interest.

2. Apply and tune state-of-the-art deep reinforcement learning algorithms on the simulated control problem and perform a study on how different assumptions give rise to different scientific patterns.

3. Develop academic communication skills including technical presentations and academic paper writing.

 

- Skills required: 

1. Proficiency in programming and software engineering (Python will be the primary language)

2. Basic knowledge in machine learning (CS181)


- Learning outcomes:

1. Students can define their own problem in an fast-progressing interdisciplinary area of research

2. Develop skills working with cutting edge machine learning technologies

3. Develop academic communication skills in preparation for graduate study and academic career

4. Goal of this project is to submit an academic paper to a peer-reviewed journal or conference


- Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project

1. Minimal commitment of 20 hours per week during summer time

2. The student is welcomed to keep working on the project during regular school year


- Mentoring:

Students will be mentored by a senior PhD student in the group and meet with the mentor 1-2 times per week via zoom. Students will be invited to the group's slack channel where they can connect with other members of the group. Students can also attend weekly group meetings / talks and frequently meet with PI to present project updates.

- Student stipend: Negotiable depending on level of commitment

- Application information: Please submit your application via email to prof. Mahadevan (lmahadev@g.harvard.edu) and Kexin Yi (kyi@g.harvard.edu) and include the following information

1. A short statement indicating academic background and research interest (less than 400 words)
2. Resume or CV
3. Transcript

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Lipschitz, Digital Behavioral Health & Informatics Research Program, BWH

 

Contact information: Jessica Lipschitz, BWH Department of Psychiatry, 221 Longwood Ave, Boston MA 02115, http://digitalhealth.bwh.harvard.edu/

 

Project description and duties: Student will assist with two review manuscripts. One focused on a review of randomized controlled trials of mobile app interventions for depression and the other focused on use of ecological momentary assessment in studies of mental illness. Primary responsibilities will be screening articles for inclusion in the review and extraction of key information/data from articles. There will be opportunities for virtual inclusion in interdisciplinary lab meetings and research talks.

 

Skills required: Good reading and writing skills; Attention to detail; Motivated and engaged students will be included as authors on resulting scientific publications.

 

Learning outcomes: improve understanding of process of assembling writing a systematic review, improved understanding of clinical trials in digital health and psychiatry, exposure to various areas of research in mental/behavioral health and informatics/digital health.

 

Number of hours students are expected to work: Negotiable, at least 10 hours per week for 12 weeks.

 

Mentoring: student will have one mentoring meeting per week with Dr. Lipschitz and close communication with Dr. Lipschitz throughout the week. Opportunities to engage with other PIs including Dr. Katherine Burdick as well as Dr. Lipschitz’s computer science collaborators will also be a possibility. All mentoring meetings will be via zoom.

 

Student stipend: Unpaid

 

Application information: Please send a short email with resume attachment to jlipschitz@bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, LCN, Martinos Center, MGH

Contact information: Lilla Zöllei, PhD Assistant Professor of Radiology, HMS Email: lzollei@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu Phone: 617-643-7791

https://scholar.harvard.edu/lillazollei/home

A.A .Martinos Center, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129 https://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/lab/lcn

Project description and duties: There are three projects offered. All of them are related to automated brain image analysis tool developed for the analysis of infant brain MRI images.

1. literature review: to dive into the rapidly developing vast literature for deep-learning based methods related to the tools that are currently being developed in the lab (eg.: spatial registration and cortical and subcortical labeling)

2. generation of digital material (movies, figures, plots, ...) to promote existing research work in popular science

3. manual editing and / or labeling of anatomical areas; scoring the accuracy of automated tool outcomes where ground truth data does not exist Sample publications that relate to the above tasks ca be found at: https://arxiv.org/abs/2001.03091 https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.12101 https://arxiv.org/abs/2004.04617 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1053811919304434

Skills required: For the above projects, the student is expected to have a general interest in and high level curiosity for neuroscience, computational methods and / or human neurodevelopment.

Particular skills per project:

1. great communication and writing skills, basic understanding of deep learning methods

2. advanced knowledge of an image / video editing software and / or scientific plotting tools

3. basic knowledge of human neuroanatomy, attention to detail

Learning outcomes: presentation skills, data analysis methods, insight into a fastly developing research area, possibility of connecting with multiple people from a diverse group of scientists

Expectations: Ideally, the student would be expected to spend 6-8 hrs/ day on this project for a duration of 8 weeks. There is, however, flexibility in the schedule and that can be discussed between the applicant and the PI.

Mentoring: The PI will be mentoring the undergraduate directly. There will be daily check-ins required and a minimum of 2 live chats per week. The student will be able attend weekly research group zoom meetings of the Laboratory of Computational Neuroimaging.

Student stipend: This can be a paid position. Students are also encouraged to apply for Harvard / outside fellowships.

Application information: Email your CV and cover letter to Dr. Lilla Zöllei at lzollei@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

Posted April 28, 2020

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Hodin’s Gastrointestinal Epithelial Biology Laboratory, MGH

PI: Dr. Richard Hodin, Department of Surgery, and Massachusetts General Hospital.

Location: Jackson Research Building, 50 Blossom Street, Boston, MA 02114

Email: RHODIN@mgh.harvard.edu

Project description:

The goal of the ongoing research is to understand the normal gut epithelial development, gut microbiome, pathological conditions such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn’s/Colitis, other gut-derived diseases and the role of an enzyme called intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) in improving gut barrier and health. The intestinal defensive mechanisms are diminished in patients due to lower synthesis and activity of endogenous IAP, but the mechanism of lack or deficiency of IAP remains unclear. The various ongoing projects are related to uncover the mechanism of IAP in the context of gut barrier and diseases.

We are seeking a qualified undergraduate student that is committed to engaging in our gastrointestinal biology research at MGH.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required

Learning outcome: Mastery of laboratory skills in molecular biology, cell biology, animal handling, and microscopy. Students will also develop core research skills in project design, conducting literature review, designing controlled experiments, analyzing and interpreting scientific data, presenting research findings, and scientific writing (e.g., honors thesis, publication in scientific journals). Students will have the opportunity to contribute as a co-author in any published manuscripts.

Number of hours: Negotiable. A useful guideline is >10 hrs/week. Length of project is negotiable. Based on the student’s time and interest they can engage in independent basic science study.

Mentoring: The trainee will work directly under the supervision of a postdoctoral fellow (Dr. Vidisha Mohad), with Dr. Hodin’s active involvement.

Zoom meetings:  1-2/week will be required. Student is expected to attend research group meetings whenever possible.

Stipend: Volunteer position (No Stipend)

Students are encouraged to apply to the Harvard College Research Program (HCRP) or other fellowships for funding support. Course credit: Juniors and seniors may earn academic credit and are especially encouraged to consider basing an honors thesis on research conducted in the laboratory.

Apply: Prospective applicants should apply by submitting a curriculum vitae and a brief cover letter describing the applicant’s research interests and career goals. Please send CV and letter to Dr. Mohad (vmohad@mgh.harvard.edu)

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Nanotechnology and photodynamic therapy, MGH

Contact Information: Tayyaba Hasan, PhD   Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School

Mentor name:  Mohammad Ahsan Saad, PhD MSAAD1@mgh.harvard.edu

Faculty/PI emailthasan@mgh.harvard.edu

Lab location:  Bartlett Hall, Room 314C

Secondary/co-mentor name:  Jasenthu Liyana Pushpamali de Silva, PhD

Secondary/co-mentor primary emailJLDESILVA@mgh.harvard.edu

Project 1: Multi-inhibitor nanoconstructs for Cancer Therapeutics combination treatment

The multiple inhibitors include a photosensitizer, a chemotherapy agent or a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Student will learn the synthesis, physical characterization and optimization of tumor-targeted, photo-activatable nanoconstructs that can co-deliver multiple inhibitors without pre-mixing the agents.

Project 2: Bacterial resistance strategy foiled by light activatable molecular systems: identification of appropriate antibiotics for infection control.

The broad goal of this application is to develop a platform for rapidly identifying antibiotic susceptibility for a broad class of bacterial infections. Student will be involved in microfluids and chemistry of making cleavable probes. While that work progresses toward development of an integrated clinical system, we propose to broaden the platform to the carbapenem class of antibiotics because of their emerging role in infections, particularly in wounds. This proposal will initiate the preliminary development of chemistry for targeting the carbapenemase enzyme (which destroys carbapenem antibiotics) and explore the development of a cell phone based optical reader. This work is ongoing with clinical samples in Thailand.

Project keywords:  Photodynamic Therapy, Nanotechnology, Infections, Microfluidics, Optical Methods and Cancer

Desired student qualifications (e.g. courses taken, prior experience):  Chemical Engineering, Biology, Chemistry, Physics

What trainings could the students complete before the summer:  Familiarity with cell culture

What tools at CNS or other facilities will be used for this project:  Light scattering systems, spectroscopy, cell culture, cancers.

 

Remote Undergraduate Bioinformatics Research Opportunity – Building a Viral Sequence Database, Dr. Yu Lab, Ragon Institute

Contact information: Dr. Ce Gao, Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard
cgao4@mgh.harvard.edu  400 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139
Lab website: https://www.ragoninstitute.org/portfolio-item/yu-lab/

Project description and duties: Yu Lab at Ragon Institute has the unique opportunity to sequence a large quantity of HIV viral samples from various patient cohorts. In addition, scientists and clinical investigators in the lab have further characterized the immune response landscape of the corresponding patients in a variety of ways. Both endeavors generated a large amount of data, the compilation and analysis of which will greatly facilitate several on-going biomedical studies. A candidate of this project is responsible to process all the experimental data, and deposit them in a well-designed viral sequence database. Last but not least, the candidate will help investigators in the lab to query the database and perform statistical analysis based on the results.

For past publications, please follow the links: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30688658

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31776292

Skills required: a) Biology (A basic understanding of molecular biology; Knowledge about virology and DNA sequencing is preferred), Computer science (Data science skills: a basic skill with a script programming language (python or R preferred), statistics (Working knowledge of relational database design and management)

Learning outcomes: By the end of this program, the candidate will:

  • Have an exposure to real-life biomedical research from the perspective of computational biology/bioinformatics
  • Gain a basic understanding of virology, in particular, knowledge about human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
  • Learn fundamental bioinformatics skills: sequencing data collection and processing
  • Have the opportunity to present the work to a general audience

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: The candidate is expected to work about 16 hours per week, remotely. The project will take 2 months.

Mentoring: The candidate will be supervised by a bioinformatics specialist and have weekly zoom meetings with their mentor. She/he will also participate in the weekly (remote) research group meetings.

Student stipend: No stipend available.

Application information: Please send your resume and a brief description of your interest in this position to Dr. Gao (cgao4@mgh.harvard.edu).

 

 

Posted April 23, 2020
 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in biomedicine, Dr. Zygmanski Lab, BWH

Contact information:

Davide Brivio, Medical Physics Division, Radiation Oncology Department, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 75 Francis St. Boston MA

dbrivio@bwh.harvard.edu

Dr Zygmanski Lab website: http://mesoscopic.bwh.harvard.edu/

 

Project description and duties:

We exploit biophysics, physics, mathematics, and computer engineering to advance the fields of medical imaging and cancer therapy. We are developing

  1. novel sensors employing nano- and micro-structured thin films to monitor  treatment of cancer patients (see for instance these recent publications https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6463/ab83c0; https://doi.org/10.1002/mp.13841)
  2. new   cancer therapy and imaging modalities employing nanoparticles and/or electromagnetic and x-ray radiations (see for instance these recent publications https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6560/aa5bc7; https://doi.org/10.2217/nnm-2017-0344)

We propose two Undergraduate Summer projects which can be entirely conducted remotely.

  1. Title: Application of low-to-high intensity/frequency electric fields to imaging of tissues and disruption of cancer cells.

The project consists in the review of the state-of-the-art imaging and cancer therapy techniques utilizing electric fields fields. There are several potential advantages of electric field based techniques compared to the standard x-ray based techniques: specificity of detection or targeting of cancer cells, possibility of spectral analysis and utilization of resonance effects, low-toxicity due to usage of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation.. Several exciting preliminary investigations are reported in the literature but currently very few are sufficiently mature for clinical utilization. We aim to investigate the state of the art of these novel promising techniques at two scales: macroscopic (tissue) and nanoscopic (cell). The ideal candidate should critically review the literature, with the support of the PI and a post-doc and prepare a report.

  1. Title: Novel tool for simulating radiotherapy treatment beams for educational and research purposes

This is a computational project employing a new software tool to study radiation properties for education and research in simplified scenarios. Student are expected to setup the simulator software and to study simple radiotherapy scenarios: geometry, materials (tumor tissue with or without gold nanoparticles as contrast agents or microstructured radiation detectors, etc.). Physics, mathematics or computer engineering knowledge is a plus. The ideal candidate should have good analytical and computational skills.   

 

Skills required: For project 1, 2 no particular skills or research experience are required. Although students with biomedicine, physics or mathematics or computer engineering major are ideal for better understanding of the concept involved.

Learning outcomes:

In project 1. the student will learn the science of electromagnetic interaction with matter applied to specific medical scenarios. The student will learn how to review scientific publications and will acquire scientific communication skills. 

In project 2. the student will learn the basics physics of x-ray radiation interaction with matter for medical and high-energy physics scenarios. The student will learn the basics of setting up a Monte Carlo simulation software and how to analyze the results. The student will acquire scientific communication skills.  

Number of hours: The number of hours students are expected to work is negotiable. A minimum of four hours to eight hours per week is required during the academic year and a minimum of 30 hours per week during the summer. However, a flexible schedule is possible.

Mentoring: the student will be mentored by the Harvard Medical Physics Resident Dr Davide Brivio and by the lab Principal Investigator (PI) Dr Piotr Zygmanski. Zoom meetings will be scheduled at the student convenience (weekly or more often when more support is needed). The student can also attend research group zoom meetings. Day to day communication will be via email.

Student stipend: Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit

Application information: Please email your resume to Dr. Davide Brivio at dbrivio@bwh.harvard.edu with a short description of your research interests and of your goals of completing a research experience.

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Rahme Lab, MGH


Contact information:  PI: Laurence Rahme  Department: Department of Surgery
Contact Information: 617-724-5003  E-mail: rahme@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu
Location: 340 Thier Research Building, 50 Blossom Street, Boston, MA 02114
Lab Website: https://laurence-rahme-5y35.squarespace.com

 

Project description and duties: we can have a discussion. Depending on the interests of the student the projects and duties can be assigned.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required

Learning outcomes: research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: flexible

Mentoring: who will be mentoring the undergraduate: Research Technician, Fellows (can be discussed based on what projects interests more to the student) 

how often are mentorship zoom meetings: once/twice a week

can the student attend research group zoom meetings: encouraged

Student stipend: volunteer position

Application information: Email your resume to Dr. Rahme at rahme@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Gilmore Lab, HMS 

DEVELOPMENT OF A SCHOLARLY TREATISE ON THE FUNDAMENTAL CONSTRAINTS OF LIFE

CONTACT INFORMATION: Dr. Michael S. Gilmore Lab, Department of Ophthalmology (Microbiology), Co-Director, Harvard Microbial Sciences Initiative; Director, Infectious Disease Institute, Harvard Medical School, michael_gilmore@meei.harvard.edu

PROJECT DESCRIPTION AND DUTIES:

In an era when most science is reductionist, critical and fundamental advances are overlooked because the big picture is not seen. A few truly remarkable studies have attempted to catalog and quantify all life as it currently exists on Earth and assess its impact on the planet. These studies have been incredibly illuminating for understanding the nature and resilience of life since its origin. For example, they inform the roles played by various forms of life – microbes, plants, and animals, including humans – in carbon turnover and other processes; and they inform the life strategies used – e.g., differences in primary producers and consumers as driven by the different geographies they occupy. There are several important implications of these landmark studies that now are ripe for further consideration and development. The goal of this project, under mentorship, is to deeply and thoughtfully explore what is known or theorized about a specific implication fundamental to life, and develop a publishable treatise on the topic. 

Keywords: microbes, microbiology, global biomass, evolution, deep time, environment, pathogen, metagenomics, Earth history, life, energy, climate change

SKILLS REQUIRED: Strong self-motivation and ability to work independently and remotely, outstanding ability to quickly and efficiently assimilate and organize information, and excellence in writing ability.

Learning outcomes: Efficient tools for data assimilation, manuscript design, scientific writing, and publication.

NUMBER OF HOURS:  A first step in the project will be for the student to develop a realistic work plan for achieving the goal, considering other time demands, which vary by semester and prior experience.

MENTORING: The student will be mentored directly by Prof. Michael Gilmore, through weekly mentorship zoom meetings?

STUDENT STIPEND: Students are expected to be competitive for fellowship support.

APPLICATION INFORMATION: Detail the information students need to submit and the contact information for submitting this information: Email your resume to Dr. Gilmore at

michael_gilmore@meei.harvard.edu

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Scot Martin Lab Group, SEAS/EPS

Contact information: Scot T. Martin, SEAS/EPS, smartin@seas.harvard.edu, 58 Oxford Street Level 3, https://martin.seas.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: Drones are being increasingly used for atmospheric research for in-air gas sampling. One of the main challenges is mitigating the effects of the drone wind field on atmospheric measurements. In this project, the student will perform computational fluid dynamic simulations of rotary-wing drone wind field to determine the influence of the wind field on gases and particles and how this impacts coupled device measurements. The student will develop several different geometries of attachments that could be added to help mitigate the influence of the drone wind field and assess their effects. The final submission will be a presentation to the Martin group, a project report, and potentially a research paper.

Skills required: Experience with any computational fluid dynamics software platform (e.g. StarCCM+, OpenFOAM, Solidworks, Autodesk, Comsol), as well as some knowledge of gas and aerosol physics would be helpful but is not required. This project would be most suited to an undergraduate interested in mechanical or aeronautical engineering and preference will be given to those individuals.

Learning outcomes: Experience with using computational fluid dynamics software and performing computational simulations. Computational research skills such as study design and data analysis methods. Scientific communication skills such as presenting and scientific writing. 

Number of hours: Negotiable but full-time is preferred. Students applying should expect to spend at least 2-3 days a week working on the project.

Mentoring: Matthew Stewart (3rd Ph.D. student working on drone-based chemical sensing). Zoom meetings will be scheduled once or twice a week depending on the student's preference and schedule. The student will be able to attend research group meetings.

Student stipend: Voluntary position.

Application information: Email your resume to matthew_stewart@g.harvard.edu and smartin@seas.harvard.edu, along with a paragraph stating your interest in the project, including the number of hours you will be able to put towards the project and any relevant experience/skills.

 

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Balu’s Translational Psychiatry Laboratory at McLean Hospital

Contact information:  Darrick T. Balu, Ph.D.  McLean Hospital  Phone: 617-855-2329

Email: dbalu@mclean.harvard.edu

websites:

http://www.mcleanhospital.org/biography/darrick-balu

https://mbb.harvard.edu/people/darrick-balu

Project description and duties:

Dr. Balu’s Translational Psychiatry Laboratory uses a wide array of cutting-edge tools (transgenic mouse lines and viral techniques, biochemistry, molecular biology, immunohistochemistry, and behavior) to understand the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie the synaptic and behavioral abnormalities associated with psychiatric (schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder) and neurologic (Alzheimer’s disease, traumatic brain injury) disorders.

There are several projects that students could be involved with in the laboratory. They all are related to how the D-amino acid, D-serine, and the enzyme that generates it, serine racemase (SR), regulate NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission in the brain. The first project involves understanding how D-serine mediated NMDAR activation regulates GABAergic interneuron development during embryonic and postnatal stages, time-points that are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The second project aims to identify how D-serine release from inflammatory astrocytes contributes to the neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease. The third project aims to define the neural circuits in which serine racemase expressing neurons are engaged during various fear learning tasks, which has implications for anxiety-related disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31212068/?from_term=balu+dt&from_sort=date&from_pos=1

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5806199/

Student will participate in literature search and writing a scientific review article. Student will use Image J data analysis software to count forebrain development markers from brain sections of a schizophrenia mouse model (compared to control), that were stained with fluorescently labeled antibodies. The student can also help with other data analysis (i.e. Western blot results).

Students can learn remotely about how to conduct experiments involving mouse breeding, cognitive behavioral paradigms, brain sectioning, immunofluorescence staining and stereological cell counting.

Skills required: No prior research experience required.  

Learning outcomes: Student will learn how to conduct literature search, write scientific papers, study design, and data analysis methods. Student will be able to communicate findings through presentation at lab meetings and work in a team.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: This is flexible and based on student schedule. PI will consult with student at the beginning of project.

Mentoring: Prospective undergraduate will be mentored remotely by postdoctoral fellow, research technician, and/or PI on a weekly basis. The student can also attend research group zoom meetings.

Student stipend: Volunteer position (NO stipend)

Application information: Email your resume to Prof. Balu at dbalu@mclean.harvard.edu

 

Remote Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Chen Lab, MEEI (Mass Eye and Ear)
Contact information:  Dong Feng Chen, M.D., PhD; Schepens Eye Research Institute of Mass Eye and Ear, Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School; 20 Staniford Street, Boston, MA 02460
dongfeng_chen@meei.harvard.edu;  Tel: 617-912-7490 
Project description and duties: Dr. Chen's laboratory focuses the studies of the molecular mechanisms controlling neurodegeneration and regeneration in the eye and brain. Their goal is to apply such knowledge to the development of novel neuroprotective and regenerative approaches to treat eye diseases and reverse blindness. One of the current project is centered around the understanding of the roles of immune responses in neuron death and its manipulation for treating glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide.     
Skills required: Prior research experience is preferred but not required. 
Learning outcomes: Students will master basics concepts and skills of molecular and cellular biology, mouse genetics, and neural imaging and learn the study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.
Number of hours: Students are expected to work >10 hours during the school term (flexible) and are encouraged to work full time over the summer (flexible).
Mentoring:  The student will receive direct mentorship from Dr. Chen while the student will also be supervised on a daily basis under a postdoctoral fellow.  Students  student attend research group zoom meetings?
Student stipendStudents are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit
Application information: Email cover letter and resume to Dr. Dong Feng Chen at dongfeng_chen@meei.harvard.edu
 

 

Undergraduate Remote Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, Department of Statistics, FAS

Contact information: Marie-Abele Bind, Department of Statistics, Science Center, Room 608, https://scholar.harvard.edu/marie-abele and http://mablab.info.

Skills required: No prior research experience required. New undergraduate researchers and candidates with basic understanding of probability and statistics, and with some experience in R programming are encouraged to apply.

Learning outcomes: R programming skills, research skills such as study design, statistical analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Negotiable. Ideally, students are expected to work 5 to 10 hours a week. Length of the project: one semester.

Mentoring: Dr. Bind, Dr. Young Lee, and PhD candidate Alice Sommer will be mentoring the undergraduate. Bi-weekly mentorship meetings. Student can attend group meetings.

Student stipend: Unpaid position. Students are encourage to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities.

Course credit: Students can conduct research for course credit.

Application information: Students should email their resume to Dr. Bind at ma.bind@mail.harvard.edu.

 

 

March 18, 2020

Undergraduate research opportunity in the laboratory of Dr. Léger-Abraham, HMS

 

Dr. Léger-Abraham Lab, https://leger-abraham-laboratory.com

Microbiology Department, Blavatnik Institute | Harvard Medical School
New Research Building (940 Laboratory, 1030C Office)

77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA

Email : melissa_leger-abraham@hms.harvard.edu

Phone : (617) 432-2418

 

Description: Malaria is a devastating disease caused by mosquito-borne unicellular protozoan parasites of the Plasmodium genus. Each year, about 200 million cases of human malaria result in the death of more than a million people. Plasmodium falciparum causes the most severe form of the disease. Despite several efforts by the scientific community and global health organizations to decrease malaria-related morbidity and mortality, the incidence of infection is rising with the emergence of strains that are less sensitive to recommended treatment regimens.  

 

Leishmania parasites are distributed across the globe and cause about 1million new cases of leishmaniasis annually. The most severe form of leishmaniasis is lethal if untreated. Few therapies are available, and significant side effects and parasite resistance limit their effectiveness.

 

The Léger-Abraham lab uses methods in structural biology (NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and cryo-EM) to study how translation is carried out in Plasmodium and Leishmania parasites. The goal of these studies is to identify unique protein-protein interactions that could be targeted to generate novel antiparasitic drugs.

 

Skills required: Prior laboratory experience is not required but a good understanding of protein synthesis process is preferred.

 

Learning outcome: As part of this research program, the undergraduate research project will aim to purify messenger RNA fragments and translation initiation factors to be used in structural studies and biochemical assays. The student will obtain training in molecular biology, protein expression, and RNA isolation and purification. The student will be expected to participate in lab meeting and will get mentored to improve presentation and scientific communication skills.

 

Number of hours: The student will be expected to work >15 hours a week during term time (flexible) with full-time work over the summer encouraged.

 

Mentoring: The student will obtain direct mentorship from Dr. Léger-Abraham with additional supervision provided by research fellows.

 

Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or to register for a research course credit.

To apply, send a copy of your CV and contact for two references by email to melissa_leger-abraham@hms.harvard.edu.

 

 

February 28, 2020

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Rakesh Jain, MGH, Harvard

PI: Dr. Rakesh Jain, Director, Edwin Steele Laboratories, https://steelelabs.mgh.harvard.edu/

Project description: Reprogramming the tumor microenvironment in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma to improve immunotherapy.

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has a dismal prognosis and is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 10%. The poor survival of patients with locally advanced PDAC is due to its unresectability, aggressive biology and limited effectiveness of cytotoxic agents. Chemotherapy’s poor efficacy in PDAC has been linked in part to desmoplasia and the inhibition of immune effector cells. Our goal is to reprogram the abnormal PDAC tumor microenvironment to become immunostimulatory and reduce desmoplasia to improve the effectiveness of chemoradiotherapy and immune checkpoint blockade to increase patient survival.

 

We are seeking a qualified pre-medical student that is committed to engaging in our pancreatic cancer biology research at MGH. The trainee will work under the supervision of a postdoctoral fellow and is expected to attend weekly lab meetings. In addition to our pancreatic cancer research, the student can participate in other gastroenterology and hepatic projects. Prospective applicants should apply by submitting a curriculum vitae and a cover letter describing the applicant’s research interests and career goals.

Skills required: No prior experience is required

Learning outcome: Lab skills, in vivo and in vitro experiments, translational research, study design, data analysis, presentations, scientific writing

Number of hours: Depending on the student’s time and interest they can engage in independent basic science and/or translational aspects of our program. Minimum 10 hours/week commitment. Required to attend weekly lab meeting. Length of project is negotiable.

Mentoring: The trainee will work directly under the supervision of a postdoctoral fellow (Dr. Jessica Posada). Students are encouraged to apply to the Harvard College Research Program (HCRP) or other fellowships for funding support. Students can also apply for research course credit. Students will have the opportunity to contribute as a co-author in any published manuscripts.

Apply: Prospective applicants should apply by submitting a curriculum vitae and a brief cover letter/email describing the applicant’s research interests and career goals. Please send CV and letter to Dr. Posada (jposada@partners.org).

 

 

February 4, 2020

Undergraduate Position, Human Thyroid Cancers Preclinical and Translational Research Laboratory, BDIMC

Carmelo Nucera, MD, PhD Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Simon C. Fireman Research Center Harvard Medical School 99 Brookline Avenue Office Room: RN-0270A Email 1: cnucera@bidmc.harvard.edu Office-Phone: 617-667-5964 Lab-Phone: 617-667-1696 Fax: 617-667-3591 Boston (MA) 02215, USA

 

My laboratory is open to accept undergraduate students. I'm genuinely dedicated to mentor undergraduate students and advancing translational Thyroid Cancer Research and non-coding RNA-based discoveries.

I'm actively committed to mentor and apply my research to patient care, to facilitate innovation for healthcare, solve unmet clinical needs, and ultimately improve public health.

I am an MD/PhD with specialty in endocrine cancers and I’m developing as Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School a multidisciplinary research program in the "Division of Cancer Biology and Angiogenesis/Experimental Pathology" at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School, focused on "preclinical and translational models of human thyroid cancer with an emphasis on mechanisms of metastatic networks, new models of in vitro angiogenesis, tumor microenvironment, and metabolic regulations, using novel targeted therapies anti-BRAFV600E anti-tumor microenvironment. I am primarily engaged in basic and translational thyroid cancer research, but also actively participate in tutoring and teaching activities to basic science students and medical students. I have more than 10-years of research and clinical experience.

In particular, my research interests are in elucidating mechanisms by which the oncogene BRAFV600E leads to the invasive and metastatic phenotype in aggressive and iodine-refractory thyroid cancers.

I'm highly committed and motivated to applying my research and effort to patient care, to facilitate innovation, to solve unmet clinical needs, and improve public health.

I have been awarded from the American Thyroid Association, the NIH/NCI for Thyroid Cancer Research, Tumor Microenvironment, and BRAFV600E.

My translational research and mentoring program is aimed:

(i) To determine the prognostic role of Long intergenic non-coding RNA (LIncRNA) in thyroid cancer.

(ii) To identify new prognostic biomarkers and validate therapeutics for treating metastatic/refractory thyroid cancers.

(iii) To identify pro-metastatic/-angiogenic and metabolic pathways in the microenvironment of BRAFV600E-positive thyroid cancer.

(iv)To determine the function of lymphatic/blood vessels in thyroid cancer and identify driver clones in the angiogenic microenvironment of thyroid tumors (tumor heterogeneity).

(v) To investigate pathogenesis and molecular basis of “orphan and rare’ endocrine diseases.

The hours of intershnisp per week are variable and can be discussed and set along with the student.

If you are interested in applying to this program please submit your Curriculum Vitae and email address of 2 references (i.e. Faculty) to:

Carmelo Nucera cnucera@bidmc.harvard.edu 

 

 

Undergraduate Research Position, MGH Cancer Center

Contact information: Leif W. Ellisen, MD, PhD Professor of Medicine, HMS and Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, lellisen@mgh.harvard.edu
CPZN4204, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114;

(617)726-4315  http://ellisenlab.com

Project description and duties: The laboratory studies how transcription factors and DNA damage response pathways contribute to cancer pathogenesis. The major focus is breast cancer and head and neck cancer, where the group investigates how understanding deregulated transcription factors such as p53, and DNA repair factors such as BRCA1/2 can inform new cancer prevention and treatment approaches. Multiple Harvard undergraduates have previously worked in the lab and have gone on to complete their senior honors thesis based on the work.

A well-defined project will be crafted based on students’ particular interests, skills, and time commitment.

Skills required: Working familiarity with research laboratory environments (through prior exposure such as a high school or college summer internship) and at least two of the following college courses completed: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Genetics, Developmental Biology.

Learning outcomes: Mastery of technical skills in routine molecular biology, cell biology, animal handling, and microscopy. Students will also develop core research skills in framing a project, designing controlled experiments, analyzing and interpreting data, presenting research findings, and scientific writing (e.g., honors thesis, publication in scientific journals, descriptions for a lay audience).

Number of hours: Negotiable. A useful guideline is >10 hrs/week.

Mentoring: Direct mentoring will be provided by a senior postdoctoral fellow, with Dr. Ellisen’s active involvement. Student can attend (and make oral presentations in) group meetings.

Student stipend: Students are encouraged (and supported) to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Course credit: Juniors and seniors may earn academic credit and are especially encouraged to consider basing an honors thesis on research conducted in the laboratory.

Application information: Please email Dr. Ellisen at lellisen@mgh.harvard.edu and visit our website at http://ellisenlab.com.

 

 

 

Posted Jan 13, 2020

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Kaiser Lab, Brigham and Women's Hospital

PI name, department, contact information, location, lab website: Dr. Ursula Kaiser, M.D., Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 221 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA

 

Undergraduate basic/translational research assistant

PI name, department, contact information, location, lab website: Dr. Ursula Kaiser, M.D., Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 221 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA

Description of the project and duties: Students will learn key theoretical concepts and varied experimental techniques relating to genetics, mouse models and molecular biology focused on understanding the neuroendocrine regulation of the reproductive axis.  (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=kaiser+ub+and+dlk1 ).

Current projects focus on the mechanism of Makorin Ring Finger Protein 3 (MKRN3), the most common genetic etiology described in children with central precocious (early) puberty, discovered initially by Dr. Kaiser’s lab in 2013. Using a recombinant adeno-associated virus overexpressing Mkrn3, the goal of the current project is to understand how hypothalamic overexpression of Mkrn3 leads to delayed puberty in female but not male mice and to use this a model to understand MKRN3’s mechanism of action.

Skills required. Prior research experience is preferred but not required.

Learning outcome: Students will have the opportunity to learn basic laboratory research skills, study design, data analysis method, presentations, and scientific writing in a vibrant research setting. Research experiences may include but are not limited to animal husbandry, rodent handling, assessment of rodent puberty and reproduction, tissue collection, DNA/RNA/protein extraction, polymerase chain reaction, cell culture and rodent surgical procedures including stereotaxic injection.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: The number of hours students are expected to work is negotiable. A minimum of six hour to ten hours per week is required however a flexible schedule is possible. A minimum commitment of one semester is required, with opportunities available for longitudinal experiences.

Mentoring: Dr. Kaiser will serve as the primary mentor and the student will be supervised on a daily basis by Dr. Stephanie Roberts.  The students will meet with Dr. Roberts on a daily basis and mentoring meetings with Dr. Kaiser will be held frequently. Students are also encouraged to attend the weekly Kaiser laboratory meeting if their schedule allows.

Does laboratory provide any funds to pay student’s stipend? Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

What information students need to submit and contact information for submitting this information: Please email your resume to Dr. Stephanie Roberts at stephanie.roberts@childrens.harvard.edu with a short description of your goals of completing a research experience.

 

 

Posted Jan 10, 2020

Undergraduate Research Position, Dr. Maxim Prigozhin Lab, MCB Department

MCB Department, Quantitative Biology Initiative, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Department of Applied Physics, Harvard University

MULTICOLOR AND TIME-RESOLVED ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF CELL SIGNALING

KEYWORDS: biophysics, optics, single-molecule fluorescence, single-particle electron microscopy, cryo-EM, cathodoluminescence, nanoparticles for biology, cryo-vitrification, time-resolved vitrification, cell signaling, GPCRs, neuroscience Electron microscopy is an ideal imaging technique to study biological cells at the nanoscale. However, typically electron microscopy only provides static black-and-white images. In an effort to enable multicolor and time-resolved electron microscopy, my lab will develop dedicated molecular probes and instrumentation for new correlative light and electron microscopy modalities, and build next-generation biophysical tools for timeresolved cryo-vitrification and high-resolution imaging of cells. These methods will be used to elucidate the nanoscale protein and membrane dynamics of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in differentiated cells and complex tissues.

RESEARCH AREAS:

1) Instrumentation development for single-particle fluorescence and electron

imaging

2) Synthesis, functionalization, and biological applications of nanoparticles

3) Cell biology of GPCR signaling and of neural transmission

If you are interested in joining or have other questions, please contact Max Prigozhin at

maxim_prigozhin@harvard.edu. Graduate students are encouraged to apply through

the following PhD programs at Harvard:

· Molecules, Cells, and Organisms

· Applied Physics

· Systems, Synthetic, and Quantitative Biology

In your application, please indicate your interest in pursuing your PhD work with Max.

 

 

 

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Aguayo-Mazzucato Lab, Joslin Diabetes Center

Cristina Aguayo-Mazzucato MD PhD, Section of Islet Cell and Regenerative Biology

Joslin Diabetes Center rm 468A
1 Joslin Place, Boston, MA 02215   Phone 617 309 4782
Email: cristina.aguayo-mazzucato@joslin.harvard.edu
Website: https://www.joslin.org/find-an-expert/cristina-aguayo-mazzucato

Description of the project and duties: The risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) increases with age and given the importance of beta cell loss/dysfunction in the development of the disease we would like to further our understanding of the effects of beta cell aging in the development of T2D. We have identified markers to evaluate the age of individual beta cells and have mouse models that allow us to specifically delete old beta cells and evaluate the effects of this intervention in the disease. Students would mainly work using rodent models with techniques that range from immunohistochemstry, basic molecular biology, cell culture, islet isolation, evaluation of insulin secretion, ELISA, FACS sorting to animal work with interventions such as high fat diet or implants. Some translational work using pancreatic samples from donors is also available. The role of beta cell aging in type 1 diabetes will also be evaluated.

Links to relevant publications:

1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31767811

2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31155496

3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31155496

4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28380379

5. Video: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-05/jdc-rrb052919.php

 

No prior research experience required.

Learning outcomes

Students will acquire experience in the following competencies of scientific research:

1. Understand the different components of the Scientific Method.

2. Participate in the planning and design of a project

3. Learn and perform the necessary experimental techniques necessary to complete said project.

4. Data analysis and presentation of generated experimental data.

5. Work on scientific writing to communicate relevant information.

Number of hours and length of stay: Approximately 10-15 h per week for a minimum of 3-4 months. However, different arrangements will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Mentoring: Students will be mentored directly by Dr. Aguayo-Mazzucato regarding project design, data analysis, presentation and scientific writing. Students will work in the lab with one of our senior members who will teach them the necessary techniques and assist the students with technical questions. Students are expected to be fairly independent once they have been taught the techniques and an overall plan has been made for the execution of the project. Weekly meetings will be held with the PI to go over obtained results and plan activities for the week ahead.

Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit

Interested candidates should submit a cover letter and resume to Cristina Aguayo-Mazzucato at cristina.aguayo-mazzucato@joslin.harvard.edu

 

 

Posted Jan 2, 2020

Research Assistant, Demehri Laboratory, Center for Cancer Immunology, MGH/HMS

Full time research assistant position is available immediately in our laboratory at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School to study the mechanisms of immune regulation of early cancer development and the role alarmins and commensal viruses in this process. The position is ideal for a recent graduate planning to work for couple of years in research before entering graduate or medical school. Besides bench research, applicant will have the opportunity to learn about clinical care for patients with severe skin cancers and skin-related adverse effects of cancer immunotherapies. Attention to detail, high motivation, and effective communication skills are essential. Knowledge in immunological, molecular, and mice experimentations are considered important for this position.

Visit our laboratory website for more detail:

http://massgeneral.link/DemeheriLab

Please email a cover letter and CV to Dr. Shawn Demehri:

sdemehri1@mgh.harvard.edu
 

 

Posted December 6, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunities in gene regulation of normal and malignant hematopoiesis using CRISPR methods and bioinformatics analyses, Dr. Tenen Lab, BIDMC

Contact informationbtrinh@bidmc.harvard.edu

Hospital: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center 
(Note: location = Longwood campus)

Description of the project and duties

With recent advances in sequencing technologies, many thousands of noncoding RNAs have been identified and are increasingly reported to be aberrantly expressed in cancer. Our studies focus on understanding the roles and the underlying mechanisms of noncoding RNA-mediated gene regulation in normal and malignant hematopoiesis. As part of this research program, the undergraduate research projects aim to 1) perturb expression of noncoding RNAs in leukemic cells using CRISPR technologies and investigate the consequences of this perturbation in cell growth and differentiation, and 2) identify ncRNAs aberrantly expressed in leukemia for mechanistic studies using bioinformatics analyses of transcriptome-wide and genome-wide data. Depending on background and interest, students will learn about laboratory and/or bioinformatics skills related to the stated aims.

Skills required. Basic laboratory skills (mammalian cell culture and/or molecular cloning) and/or computer language understanding (Linux, R, Python) are preferred.

Learning outcome: laboratory skills, research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentations, scientific writing. Depending on student background and interest, the following techniques might be taught: Assays for cell growth and differentiation, sub-cloning, CRISPR knock-out, CRISPR activation. Student who is interested in Bioinformatics will learn about RNA-seq, ChIP-seq and Microarray analyses.

Number of hours: Students are expected to work for course-credit >=15hrs/week. Full-time during the summer. The project will be personalized based on student’s experience and time commitment (flexible with prior arrangement)

Mentoring: The students will be co-mentored by Dr. Tenen and his research fellow, Dr. Trinh. They are principal investigators on NIH-funded projects. Students will have chances acquiring knowledge from Dr. Tenen, an expert on gene regulation in blood development and leukemia. Dr. Trinh will serve as daily supervisor teaching the students with related background and methods. The students are welcome to attend lab meetings, work-in-progress seminars, and one-on-one interactions with the co-mentors.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position or for credit position. We would also be happy to help you apply for relevant fellowships (contact Dr. Babakhanyan at ababakhanyan@fas.harvard.edu for more info on HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit).

Contact informationbtrinh@bidmc.harvard.edu

How to apply: send a copy of your CV including contacts of at least 2 references by email

Location: Longwood campus

 

Posted November 1, 2019

 

Research Assistant, MGH IHP SAiL Literacy Lab

Tiffany Hogan, PhD, Director, SAiL Literacy Lab, MGH Institute of Health Professions

Research Assistant for the SAiL Literacy Lab, primarily working on the research study Orthography and Word Learning (OWL). The purpose of this study is to better understand how children learn spoken and written words. It is a longitudinal investigation of children with typical development and children with language impairment who are in kindergarten through second grade.

Below are some of the responsibilities for this position:

Prepare recruitment materials

Prepare treatment materials

Assess children using standardized clinical tests (all training will be provided)

Data entry and processing

Writing reports

Other tasks as needed

No research skills/experience required.

Research assistants will gain hands on experience assessing children, entering and processing data, as well as being a part of an active research lab.

Looking for 20 hours, either in the morning or afternoon. No evening hours. The current need is until June, the end of the school year, but has the potential for a commitment extension or future work with the lab.

Hourly rate between $13 and $15.

Please submit letter of interest and resume via email to Mary Rasner, Lab Coordinator, mrasner@mghihp.edu

 

 

 

 

Understanding the Molecular Mechanism and Developing Therapies in Neuromuscular Diseases, Dr. Gupta, HMS

PI Information:  Vandana A Gupta, PhD

Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, NRB 168A, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115

Ph: 617-525-4452  Email: vgupta@research.bwh.harvard.edu Website: http://guptalab.bwh.harvard.edu/

Project Description: This project is focused on understanding the role of novel genes in neuromuscular development and disease pathology. This is a research position that will involve cloning, bacterial cultures, mammalian cell culture, characterization of mutant zebrafish lines and performing genetic and chemical screens to develop therapeutics. We are looking for a self-motivated and creative student to work in a team as well as independently. No prior research experience is required.

Project Timeline: We are looking for a time commitment of a minimum of 10 hours/week for 6-12 months.

Skills Required: Previous experience with molecular biology or cell culture techniques would be great. However, students with no prior research experience are also encouraged to apply.

Learning Outcome: Research design, experimental skills, data analysis, research presentations, writing scientific papers.

Mentoring: Dr. Gupta will be mentoring students and will be meeting atleast once per week with students. Regular mentoring and training for new skills will be provided.

Funding: Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

Contact: Email your resume and research interests to Dr. Gupta at

vgupta@research.bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

Research Assistant/Student Programmer, The Speech and Feeding Disorder Lab (Dr. Jordan Green), MGH Institute of Health Professions

PI: Dr. Jordan Green

79/96 13th Street, Boston MA 02129

https://www.mghihp.edu/research/speech-and-feeding-disorders-lab

Questions? Please contact the SFDL Lab Manager, Brian Richburg at brichburg@mghihp.edu

Our lab is looking for someone experienced in Matlab programming to help us maintain and expand a series of scientific scripts in use by the lab. These scripts involve basic signal processing and the calculation of statistics time-series data, including acoustic (audio) and kinematic (movement) signals.

Our lab is dedicated to advancing knowledge and clinical practice through basic and applied research on speech & swallowing disorders. Some of our current projects include tracking facial motor function after facial transplant, studying bulbar symptoms in people with ALS, and using new camera technology to develop assistive communication devices for people with speech impairments.

You can access a list of recent publications here.

Skills required. No prior research experience is required. Students should have experience programming in Matlab including signal processing, and graphic user interface design.

Learning outcome: Students will have the opportunity to apply their programming knowledge to real-world research data related to speech disorders arising from neurologic impairment. Students will gain familiarity with a variety of research methods and data analysis routines for studying facial biomechanics, which may include processing data from: Motion capture, electromagnetic articulography, acoustic analysis and EMG data.

Students would be expected to work approximately 10 hours per week.

After the initial training, students will have weekly meetings with the lab manager. Depending on the project selected, the student may be assigned to work with a Doctoral student or Postdoc on a research project.

Does laboratory provide any funds to pay student’s stipend? Yes, research assistants will be paid an hourly rate of $18.

Please email your resume to Brian Richburg at brichburg@mghihp.edu

 

 

Posted October 18, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Center for Brain/Mind Medicine, BWH

Principal Investigators (PIs) Contact Information: Dr. Seth Gale and Dr. Kirk Daffner, Center for Brain/Mind Medicine, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), Harvard Medical School
60 Fenwood Road, Boston MA

Description: We are seeking an undergraduate student to serve as a research volunteer at the BWH Alzheimer Center, a clinical neurosciences group within the Department of Neurology at BWH. Working with the PIs and research assistants, the student will assist in the management and growth of an ongoing research study, the Brain Health Champion (BHC) Study. The BHC study is a multi-modal, technology-supported health coaching intervention for patients with or at-risk for cognitive decline and memory disorders. The chief goal is to help patients implement and adhere to critically important evidence-based health and lifestyle recommendations, including aerobic exercise, dietary recommendations, and cognitively and socially stimulating activities, to improve cognition, function, and quality of life. The BHC Study has completed one successful pilot trial with plans to scale up across multiple BWH clinics.

The student will have an opportunity to participate in educational/academic and patient care activities, including attending conferences and clinical teaching rounds. This position is ideal for an individual interested in a career in health care.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required. Interest in neuroscience or psychology is preferred. Interest working with geriatric/cognitively impaired participants is preferred. Statistical experience, including data analytics in SPSS and/or R, is a plus.

Learning outcome: The student will contribute to research activities related to the BHC Study, including: literature review, participant recruitment, data collection, and data analysis/presentation.

Number of hours: The student is expected to work 5-10 hours per week. Specific days and times are negotiable.

Mentoring: Dr. Seth Gale and research assistant Taylor Krivanek will be mentoring the undergraduate. Students will be encouraged to attend group meetings.

Stipend: This is a volunteering position, but students are encouraged to apply for Harvard fellowships. Work can also be performed for course credit where applicable.

How to apply: If you are interested in this position, please send your resume/CV and a brief email introducing yourself and describing your research interests to: Taylor Krivanek, RA, at tkrivanek@bwh.harvard.edu.

 

 

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Haider lab, Schepens Eye Research Institute

PI name: Neena Haider, Schepens Eye Research Institute,  20 Staniford St, Boston MA, Web: http://www.schepens.harvard.edu/haider

 Description of the project and duties : this will depend on applicant and hours they are available. Applicant will help with ongoing projects and can learn genotyping, animal husbandry, cell culture, functional genomics, and/or cell and molecular biology techniques.

No skills required! We will teach you how to do cutting edge genomic, molecular biology, research.

Learning outcome: laboratory skills, research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentation skills

Number of hours students are expected to work: Negotiable! Minimum 5-10 hours/week

Mentoring: Direct mentoring from the PI, lab manager, and postdoctoral fellow

Does laboratory provide any funds to pay student’s stipend? Students are strongly encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit, and there may be options for lab to provide a stipend.

 Email your interest and resume to:  neena_haider@meei.harvard.edu

 

 

Posted September 20, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in CAR T cell Manufacturing (Novina Lab)

Contact informationNovinaLAB@dfci.harvard.edualberto_nobili@dfci.harvard.edu

Hospital: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 
(Note: location = Longwood campus)

Project description and duties: T cells with Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CAR T cells) are engineered lymphocytes which are reprogrammed to deliver a potent immune response upon binding to the surface of tumors. They are a novel technology which in the past ten years has revolutionized the field of cancer immunotherapy thanks to their unprecedented successes in the treatment of hematologic malignancies like leukemias and lymphomas. The Novina Lab has developed a next-gen CAR T cell platform to expand these successes to other malignancies like Multiple Myeloma (MM), Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) and Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas (DIPG). You will be working under the supervision of scientists and physicians for the production of new CAR T cells batches which will be used in pre-clinical in vitro experiment and in vivo mouse models. The success of these experiment will set the basis for the start of physician-initiated clinical trials at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

Skills required: previous experience in mammalian cell culture is preferred.

Learning outcomes: Students working on this project will learn how to generate CAR T cell by applying our lab’s established Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). This will allow the students to learn basic wet lab techniques like: media preparation, mammalian cultures passaging, human T cell activation, human T cell viral transduction and batch quality control via flow cytometry. An important aspect of training in the Novina lab is learning to conduct translational research using clinical samples, advanced technologies, computational methods, and humanized model systems. This internship will provide a multi-discipline training environment that leverages basic, clinical, and industry collaborations which will provide a direct insight in the learning of the techniques necessary to develop a career in the field of gene therapy/immunotherapy.

Number of hours students are expected to work: minimum of 12 hours per week (3x4 hours)

Length of the project: minimum of 6 months (the longer the more you will get out of it)

Mentoring: Dr. Novina, scientists and senior postdocs in the lab actively mentor students through weekly meetings, lab group meetings, and one-on-one interactions. You will be welcome to join our lab meetings.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position or for credit position. We would also be happy to help you apply for relevant fellowships (contact Dr. Babakhanyan at ababakhanyan@fas.harvard.edu for more info on fellowships).

How to apply: send a copy of your CV by email to  : NovinaLAB@dfci.harvard.edualberto_nobili@dfci.harvard.edu

 

 

Posted September 17, 2019

Research Opportunity in functional brain imaging at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH/HMS

Contact information:
Dr. Jonathan Polimeni and Dr. Olivia Viessmann
Athinoula  A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH, Harvard Medical School

13th Street, CNY75, Charlestown, MA, 02129, USA

Website: https://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/lab/mr-pig

Project description and duties:

Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is used to study neuronal activity in the human brain non-invasively. FMRI techniques have been refined and pushed to higher resolution over the last decade with the hope to improve the ability of this technique to accurately measure neuronal function.

A substantial aspect of fMRI is post-acquisition image processing of the data. This involves multiple steps, such as subject motion correction, registrations, filtering and inhomogeneity corrections. The order and combination of these steps changes the “effective” resolution and can make or break our ability to fully harness the information in high-resolution data. This project aims to investigate these image processing steps and their effect on fMRI data quality with the goal of determining an optimal pipeline.

Skills required:

We are looking for a student with a background in either CS, Physics, EE or similar that is interested in learning more about image analysis, fMRI and the human brain. No prior knowledge in neuroscience, fMRI, or fMRI data analysis is required. The student should be comfortable with LINUX/UNIX and either Matlab or Python.

Learning outcomes:

Most of the work will comprise data analysis in Matlab and bash scripting. The student will gain experience in specific software for brain imaging data, handling large data sets, signal processing, and of course MRI. There might be the opportunity to gain experience in academic writing towards the end of the project, for example to write up results for a conference abstract.

Number of hours: We expect the student to work on site one day/week for a couple of hours. The total length of the project is negotiable, for now we anticipate one semester.

Mentoring: The student will be mentored by Olivia Viessmann, who is a postdoctoral research fellow with many years of experience with MRI. The student and mentor can meet weekly, the student is encouraged to attend the weekly group meetings and also has the opportunity to attend scan sessions and experience how MR data is acquired.

Student stipend: No. Students are encouraged to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities. We accept volunteers.

Course credit: TBD.

Application informationStudents should describe their interest in this research and submit their resume to Olivia Viessmann at oviesssmann@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Dr. Robin Hopkins Lab at the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University

Contact information: Postdocs: Dr. Antonio Serrato and Dr. Samridhi Chaturvedi

Department: Organismal and Evolutionary Biology Contact: serrato@fas.harvard.edu and schaturvedi@fas.harvard.edu

Location: Weld Hills research building at the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University.

Lab website: http://hopkins-lab.org/

Project description and duties: Research in the lab focuses on speciation and adaptation in Phlox. The lab is working on projects looking at mating incompatibilities in plants, hybridization between different species of plants and long-term selection experiments. Duties can include growing and taking care of plants, phenotyping them for different traits, imaging samples and possible molecular laboratory work 

Skills required: No prior research experience is required. Some experience in biology, plant science would be helpful but not required.

Learning outcomes: Plant growing, crossing, phenotyping, pollen-pistil imaging. Possibility of learning molecular lab

techniques such as RNA/DNA extraction.

Number of hours: Can be negotiated.

Mentoring: The undergraduate researcher will be mentored by the PI in conjunction with two postdoctoral researchers in the lab.

Course credit: Work can be performed for course credit for qualifying course/programs.

Application information: Interested students should email their resume or questions to Dr. Antonio Serrato:

serrato@fas.harvard.edu and Dr. Samridhi Chaturvedi: schaturvedi@fas.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Konkle Lab, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Contact Information:  Dr. Ruosi Wang (ruosiwang@g.harvard.edu), Cognitive and Neural Organization Lab (Lab website: https://konklab.fas.harvard.edu). PI: Talia Konkle. Location: 7th floor William James Hall, 33 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA 02138.

Project description and duties: The student will be a part of the ongoing project investigating how we process high-level properties of objects, such as animacy and size. We use a combination of behavioral and neural methods to explore the temporal dynamics of neural responses that contribute to these processes. The student will help to collect stimuli, run participants in behavioral and EEG (electroencephalogram) experiments.

Requirements:  Attention to details and high level of motivation. Prior experience running behavioral/neuroimaging experiments in psychology is a plus but not required.

Learning outcomes: Students will gain the experience necessary for conducting cognitive research, such as creating stimulus sets, recruiting and testing participants. Students will also learn how to collect EEG data in a laboratory setting.

Number of Hours: Students are expected to work 10-15 hours a week.  Specific days/times are negotiable.

Mentoring: Students are encouraged to attend weekly team research meetings. Also, Dr. Ruosi Wang and Graduate student Emily Josephs will be mentoring the student. The mentorship meetings will happen weekly.

Student stipend: This is a volunteering position, but we encourage students to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Course credit: Course credit is available for this position.

Application information: Please email your resume and cover letter to Ruosi Wang at ruosiwang@g.harvard.edu.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Farokhzad Lab, BWH

PI: Dr. Omid Farokhzad, Center for Nanomedicine
60 Fenwood Road Boston, MA 02115  Phone: 617-732-6093

E-Mail: ofarokhzad@bwh.harvard.edu   http://farokhzad.bwh.harvard.edu/wp/

Project 1

Project description and duties: The aim of the project is to develop nanoparticles as carriers for mRNA/siRNA delivery and gene therapy.

Skills required: Major in biology/biochemistry or related discipline (juniors or seniors are preferred)

Learning outcomes: You will be gaining the research skills such as study design, data analysis, presentations, and scientific writing etc.

Number of hours: 5 – 10 hours per week (negotiable).

Mentoring: Dr. Yuan Liu (Postdoc in the Farokhzad Lab) will be mentoring the undergraduate. Students are encouraged to attend the group meetings.

Project 2

Project description and duties: The aim of the project is to develop new nanomaterials including 2D nanomaterials and nanoscale metal-organ frameworks for tumor therapy and bacterial killing.

Skills required: Major in materials science/chemistry/biology/biochemistry or related discipline (juniors or seniors are preferred)

Learning outcomes: You will be gaining research skills such as study design, data analysis, presentations, and scientific writing, etc.

Number of hours: 5 – 10 hours per week (negotiable).

Mentoring: Dr. Zhongmin Tang (Postdoc in the Farokhzad Lab) will be mentoring an undergraduate. Students are encouraged to attend group meetings.

Student stipend: Not available from the lab (but students are encouraged to apply for Harvard fellowships:  https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities)

Course credit: Another potential option for some students (typically juniors or seniors) is to conduct research for course credit; however, a student cannot earn course credit and be paid a stipend in the same semester.

How to apply: Please send your resume and statement of research interest to Dr. Wei Tao (wtao@bwh.harvard.edu) in the Farokhzad Lab.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. George Church Lab, Harvard Medical School

Contact information: George Church, Department of Genetics, http://arep.med.harvard.edu/

Alexandra Rudolph, Biological and Biomedical Sciences Ph.D. Candidate, alexandra_rudolph@g.harvard.edu,

 New Research Building 233 (Harvard Medical School)

Project description and duties: Researcher’s main goal will be transferring GetK program from  Python 2.7 to Python 3.7 while retaining full functionality. Further, the researcher will work with lab members to add additional functions to the program to support current needs of the group. For additional description of the rE.coli-57 project and GetK program, please see the “Design, synthesis, and testing toward a 57-codon genome” paper.

Skills requiredPython coding experience required. No prior wet lab research experience required.

Learning outcomes: Building computational skills. Creation of output program. Presentation skills.  Candidate will be involved in subsequent publication of program.

Number of hours: Project will run approximately 6 months. Number of hours/week  is negotiable. 

MentoringAlexandra Rudolph, Akos Nyerges. Mentorship meetings will be once/week. Attendance at group meetings

 is highly encouraged.

Student stipendThe  research group will not pay a stipend to the student. Students are encouraged (but not required) to apply for Harvard fellowships:

https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Course creditThe student is welcome to earn course credit for the project  (amount of credit to depend on hours/week decided on with mentors). 

Application informationIf  interested, please email your resume to Alexandra Rudolph at alexandra_rudolph@g.harvard.edu.

 Please ensure resume fully indicates previous coding experience. If being considered for the position, lab will reach out to schedule an additional meeting with the candidate(s). 

 

 

Posted September 9, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity as a Research Assistant,  Health Decision Sciences Center, MGH 

The Health Decision Sciences Center (HDSC) at Massachusetts General Hospital is committed to improving the quality of decisions made by patients and health care providers about medical tests and treatments. The HDSC is involved in developing, implementing, and evaluating decision aids and decision quality measures to support shared decision making in medical encounters. We are seeking students to support research studies. This is an exceptional opportunity to get experience with cutting edge research focused on patient engagement and delivery of patient-centered care. Students will be supervised by Karen Sepucha, PhD, Director of the Health Decision Sciences Center and Lauren Leavitt, MA, Project Manager. 

Student activities may include: 

• Patient screening for eligibility using the electronic medical record 

• Administering surveys 

• Following up with study participants by phone 

• Identifying issues with recruitment and retention 

• Data collection, entry and analytics 

• Literature review 

• Manuscript contributions (writing, editing, proofing, references) 

• Grant proposal contributions 

Number of hours: negotiable, 5-20 hours/week 

Paid opportunity.

Interested? Send the following to Lauren Leavitt, MA: Research Project Manager via email (ljleavitt@mgh.harvard.edu

• 1 page (maximum) statement describing your research interests and goals and how this experience might help with your development 

• Your CV or Resume 

To learn more about The Health Decision Sciences Center, visit our website: https://mghdecisionsciences.org/ 

 

 

Undergraduate Clinical Research Opportunity, Cognition and Affect Research and Education Laboratory (CARE Lab), McLean Hospital

Contact Information: Dr. Andrew Peckham, McLean Hospital CARE Lab. Email (preferred): adpeckham@mclean.harvard.edu. Phone: 617-855-2946. Location: McLean Hospital (Recreation Building), 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA 02478.

Project Description and Duties: The student will work in a psychiatric hospital setting with Courtney Beard, PhD, director of the CARE lab, and Andrew Peckham, PhD, postdoctoral research fellow. The student will be a part of ongoing clinical research examining the effectiveness of an intensive Cognitive Behavioral Therapy based partial hospital program for a range of psychological problems (depression, anxiety, personality, psychosis), predictors of treatment response, and other related studies. This position would be an excellent fit for individuals interested in obtaining doctoral training in clinical psychology, psychiatry, or neuroscience. Students for the 2019-2020 year will work on two clinical research projects using EEG to understand impulsivity in psychiatric disorders. This includes an NIMH-funded project testing the efficacy of a computerized cognitive training program for impulsivity, and a Harvard-funded project using a mobile EEG device to assess daily fluctuations in cognition as a predictor of impulsive behavior. Principal experiences include: 1) assisting in running the clinical participants in the study, including recruitment, administration of computerized questionnaires and computerized experimental paradigms, 2) assisting in running clinical participants through EEG sessions to record changes in brain activity; 3) assisting the Research Coordinator in record keeping, data management and archival data collection tasks related to the research program; 4) assisting with literature searches, manuscript preparation, and presentations. More information about our research team can be found here: https://cbeard2.wixsite.com/carelab

Skills Required: Requirements for this position include excellent interpersonal skills, the ability to work independently, professional behavior appropriate for a clinical setting and interacting with psychiatric patients, and an interest in clinical research. Minimum GPA 3.5.

Learning Outcomes:  Students will learn skills necessary for conducting clinical research in an acute psychiatric hospital setting, including recruiting and consenting participants. Students will also have the opportunity to learn how to collect EEG data using both laboratory and ambulatory methods. All students have the opportunity to present a first-author poster based on an independent project. Although primary experiences are firmly with the research team, students also interact with our multidisciplinary clinical staff, including social workers, nurses, psychiatrists, and psychologists. More information about our clinical program at McLean can be found here: https://www.mcleanhospital.org/programs/behavioral-health-partial-hospital-program

Number of Hours: Minimum of 8-16 hours per week (1-2 days). Specific days/times are negotiable. Data collection in the clinical research program takes place between 8:30am and 4pm on weekdays; the program is not open on weekends.

Mentoring: Students will participate in weekly team research meetings, monthly meetings with researchers from other affiliated clinical research programs, and individual weekly supervision meetings with the lab director (Dr. Beard) and postdoctoral fellow (Dr. Peckham). Students will also have the opportunity for mentoring and career development opportunities with other McLean Hospital researchers and clinicians.

Student Stipend: This is a volunteer (non-funded) position. McLean Hospital is T-accessible and located a short distance from the Harvard University campus. We encourage students to consider applying for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities or to consider applying for the T pass program for undergraduate researchers: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-transportation.

Course Credit: If you are eligible to receive course credit for research, we will support you in doing so for this position.

Application Information: If you are interested in applying for this position, please email your resume and a brief cover letter to Dr. Andrew Peckham at adpeckham@mclean.harvard.edu.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Bind Lab, Department of Statistics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences

Contact information: Marie-Abele Bind, Department of Statistics, Science Center, Room 608, https://scholar.harvard.edu/marie-abele and http://mablab.info.

Project description and duties: (can include a link to published manuscripts describing the work)

Skills required: No prior research experience required. New undergraduate researchers and candidates with basic understanding of probability and statistics, and with some experience in R programming are encouraged to apply.

Learning outcomes: R programming skills, research skills such as study design, statistical analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Negotiable. Ideally, students are expected to work 5 to 10 hours a week. Length of the project: one semester.

Mentoring: Dr. Bind, Dr. Young Lee, and PhD candidate Alice Sommer will be mentoring the undergraduate. Bi-weekly mentorship meetings. Student can attend group meetings.

Student stipend: Unpaid position. Students are encourage to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities.

Course credit: Students can conduct research for course credit.

Application information: Students should email their resume to Dr. Bind at ma.bind@mail.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Research opportunity to study Gram-Negative Bacterial Pathogenesis in Dr. Deborah Hung's Lab, MGH

Contact information: Deborah Hung, M.D., Ph.D, Dept. of Molecular Biology  and CCIB; email:hung@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu; Mass. General Hospital, 185 Cambridge St., Boston, MA; lab website: https://ccib.mgh.harvard.edu/hung

Project description and duties:  There is an urgent need to develop novel ways of treating bacterial infections due in part to the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance. The Hung Lab at MGH's Department of Molecular Biology and CCIB studies mechanisms of Gram-negative bacterial pathogenesis in the hope of providing insight into possible new paradigms for treating bacterial infections including inhibiting bacterial virulence mechanisms, exploring host targeted therapies, and understanding bacterial susceptibility to conventional antibiotics. Undergraduate researchers will work to explore one or more of these topics using a variety of techniques including molecular cloning, next generation sequencing techniques, and classical and chemical genetics to further elucidate bacterial pathogenesis mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae or Salmonellla typhimurium, three clinically relevant Gram-negative bacterial species that are often resistant to antibiotics.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required

Learning outcomes: Students will learn laboratory skills such as molecular cloning, bacterial genetics and next generation sequencing methodologies. Students will gain research skills such as study design, data analysis methods and gain experience giving presentations and polishing their scientific writing skills.

Number of hours:  Students are expected to devote a minimum of 10-20 hours/ week to lab work. The length of the project the student is involved in is negotiable. 

Mentoring: The head of the laboratory, Deborah Hung, will mentor the undergraduate researcher in private meetings that occur every 3-4 weeks while daily mentoring will be overseen by a post-doctoral fellow or research scientist in the group who works closely with the undergraduate researcher. Undergraduate researchers are encouraged to attend group meetings.

Student stipend: available and can be sponsored by Deborah Hung, Faculty Aide Program, Federal Work-Study Program, or through a Harvard fellowship (see:https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Course credit: research can be conducted for course credit; however, a student cannot earn course credit and be paid a stipend in the same semester.

Application information: Undergraduates interested in this research opportunity should submit their resume and describe their interest in the lab in an email directed to Deborah Hung at: hung@molbio.mgh.harvard.edu 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Infectious Disease Biology, Broad Institute

Contact information: Deborah T. Hung, Core Member and Co-Director of the Infectious Disease and Microbiome Program at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard 

Email: dhung@broadinstitute.org

Website: https://www.broadinstitute.org/hung-lab

Project description and duties: The Hung laboratory studies bacterial infections, including tuberculosis, with the goal of advancing the diagnosis and treatment of these infections. We use chemical and genetic tools to dissect the biology of bacterial pathogens and their interactions with their hosts. We also use exciting recent advances in molecular biology to develop new methods for detecting pathogens. At the Broad Institute, undergraduate researchers will exploreone of these areas using a variety of techniques including molecular cloning, next generation sequencing techniques, and classical and chemical genetics 

Skills required: No previous experience is required.

Learning outcomes: Students will learn laboratory skills such as molecular cloning, bacterial genetics and next generation sequencing methodologies. Students will gain research skills such as study design, data analysis methods and gain experience giving presentations and polishing their scientific writing skills. 

Expectations: Students are expected to commit from 10 to 20 hours each week to the lab.  Over time, students are expected to become increasingly independent, developing the knowledge and skills that will allow them to play an active role in experimental design, planning, execution, and analysis.

Mentoring: The head of the laboratory, Deborah Hung, will mentor the undergraduate researcher in private meetings that occur every 3-4 weeks while daily mentoring will be overseen by a post-doctoral fellow or research scientist in the group who works closely with the undergraduate researcher. Undergraduate researchers are strongly encouraged to attend group meetings, with opportunities available to present their work.

Student stipend: available and can be sponsored by faculty, Faculty Aide Program, Federal Work-Study Program, or through a Harvard fellowship (see:https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities)

Course credit: research can be conducted for course credit; however, a student cannot earn course credit and be paid a stipend in the same semester.

Application information: Undergraduates interested in this research opportunity should submit their resume and describe their interest in the lab in an email directed to Deborah Hung at: dhung@broadinstitute.org

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Zӧllei, Laboratory of Computational Neuroimaging, A.A. Martinos Center, MGH

Contact information:  Lilla Zöllei, PhD Assistant Professor of Radiology, HMS Email: lzollei@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu Phone: 617-643-7791  https://scholar.harvard.edu/lillazollei/home
A.A .Martinos Center, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129 https://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/lab/lcn

Project description and duties: (can include a link to published manuscripts describing the work)

There are two projects offered. Both of them are related to brain image analysis tool development and deployment regarding infant brain MRI images.

      1. Using our recently developed tool Traculina to compare white matter properties of infant clinical data sets (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31132451)
      2. Improving / modifying a deep learning tool to be used to create infant atlas (https://arxiv.org/abs/1908.02738)

Skills required: For the above projects, the student is expected to have an interest in scripting and data analysis. Knowledge of neuroanatomy is helpful.

Learning outcomes: data analysis methods, presentations, scripting

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project

Ideally the student would spend 6-8 hrs/ week on this project. Fluctuation in the schedule is understood and is up for a discussion between the student and mentor.

Mentoring: Dr Zöllei will be meeting the student every week. Guidance and help will also be available from a postdoc and RA working on the same project. Additionally, the student is weclome to attend weekly group meetings of the LCN.

Student stipend: Students are encouraged to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Course credit: Dr Zöllei would be happy to discuss this with relevant faculty members

Application information: Cover letter and CV should be emailed to Dr Zöllei

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Fernandez-Godino Lab, MEEI

Contact information: Rosario Fernandez-Godino, PhD. Rosario_godino@meei.harvard.edu, Ocular Genomics Institute. Department of Ophthalmology at MEEI-HMS. https://oculargenomics.meei.harvard.edu/labs/fernandez-godino-lab/

Project description and duties: Our lab studies the role of the complement system in the formation of sub-retinal deposits in age-related macular degeneration. We use genome editing techniques to engineer induced-pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and further differentiate them into ocular cell types to model different eye diseases. We use the cell-based models to understand the mechanisms underlying the disease but also to find potential therapeutic targets.

Skills required: Students are required to have experience culturing cells. Molecular biology experience desired.

Learning outcomes: laboratory skills, research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if these are negotiable, state so): The students are required to come to the lab at least three times a week, a minimum of two hours each time. The length of the project can vary between 3-12 months.

Mentoring: who will be mentoring the undergraduate, how often are mentorship meetings, and can the student attend group meetings? The student will be mentored by two postdocs and the PI. Mentorship meetings will happen weekly, and the student will also attend the OGI group meetings every week.

Student stipend: We can’t pay an stipend, but I encourage students to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Application information: Email your resume and a cover letter to Rosario_Godino@meei.harvard.edu

 

 

Growth of high-temperature superconductor FeSe using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), Jenny Hoffman Lab, Physics Department

Contact information: PI: Jenny Hoffman, Physics Department, Please contact: Dr. Christian Matt, cmatt@g.harvard.edu, http://hoffman.physics.harvard.edu/

Project description and duties: Thin films of FeSe grown on oxide substrates (e.g. SrTiO3) show tremendously enhanced superconducting properties. Their transition temperature is enhanced by up to a factor of 10. In this project the student will be involved in the growth and development of these exotic thin-film heterostructures which are exciting candidates for all kind of novel electronic devices. The student will learn about substrate (SrTiO3, BaTiO3) preparation and use state of the art instrumentation such as atomic force microscopy and atom probe tomography for substrate characterization. With additional feedback from MBE growth results, the student would develop and improve acid-etching and annealing recipes.

Skills required: The student is required to have a strong math and physics background. Introduction to solid state physics, basic quantum mechanics are advantageous.

Learning outcomes: laboratory skills, research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing. For students devoting more than one semester, the goals is to achieve a publon (small publication).

Number of hours: The students are required to devote a minimum of 10 h/week to their research project.

Mentoring: Mentoring will be provided by PI and a graduate student or postdoc in the Hoffman lab. Montorship meetings are flexible but at least once a week. The student is encouraged but not required to attend group meetings.

Student stipend: The student is encouraged to apply for undergraduate research funding: https://uraf.harvard.edu/research-funding

Course credit: Students can conduct research for course credit.

Application information: Please submit your Resume to Christian Matt cmatt@g.harvard.edu

 

 

Posted Sep 4, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Eva-Maria Ratai’s lab, MGH

Project title: In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Brain Tumors

Contact information: Eva-Maria Ratai, PhD  Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital,
A. A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging 
Building 149, 13th Street, Room 2301  Charlestown, MA 02129
Phone: (617) 726-1744  Email: eratai@mgh.harvard.edu
lab website https://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/lab/ratailab

Project description and duties: We are looking for Harvard undergraduate students in Life Sciences who are interested in conducting research related to Neuroimaging.

Glioblastomas (GBM) are challenging cancers to treat, and positive clinical outcome in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme continues to be low.  One of the most informative imaging tools to monitor treatment response or treatment failure in brain tumors such as GBM is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).  MRI is a non-invasive technique primarily used in medical settings to produce high quality images of the inside of the human body. In addition, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a promising imaging technique that enables investigators to determine the presence and amount of specific metabolites. Thus, MRS provides information about the metabolic activity of tumors, and may give physicians critical insight into tumor activity.

Ref: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3688017/ and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29902200

Skills required: No prior research experience is required 

Learning outcomes: This work will provide the candidate with research experience in neuroimaging. Mentees will learn, study design, data analysis methods (including MATLAB, R, LCModel, FSL, NordicIce, JMP etc.), presentations, and scientific writing. The work may lead to a conference abstract and papers and will aid in her/his future career as neuroscientist or physician.

Number of hours: Negotiable

Mentoring: The student will work under direct supervision of Dr. Eva-Maria Ratai who holds the title of Clinical Spectroscopist at MGH for >15 years. Furthermore, the candidate will work directly with MGH radiologists and neurologists on this project. The candidate will attend weekly group meetings.

Student stipend: Encourage application for Harvard fellowships https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Course credit: Will support if student arranges it

Application information: Please email resume to eratai@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate lab assistant position, Taute & Mathis labs, Rowland Institute at Harvard

Contact information: Dr. Katja Taute,  Rowland Institute at Harvard
100 Edwin H Land Blvd, Cambridge, MA 02142  
taute@rowland.harvard.edu  www.tautelab.org

Job description and duties:  The Rowland Institute at Harvard is looking for an undergraduate lab assistant to support the Mathis and Taute labs. The position encompasses 8-10h/week remunerated at $15/h, and is ideal for students seeking to gain exposure to biology labs. The Rowland Institute at Harvard is located on the Charles River near Kendall Sq. A travel stipend is available.

Tasks include

  • -           glassware cleaning,
  • -           sterilizing and disinfection,
  • -           waste management,
  • -           refilling supplies.

Requirements:

  • -           STEM background (ideally biology),
  • -           Attention to detail,
  • -           Reliability.

Training in sterile technique would be advantageous.

Learning outcomes:

  • -           exposure to biology lab environment,
  • -           sterile working techniques,
  • -           wet lab management,
  • -           general and biological laboratory hygiene.

Number of hours:       8-10 h/week

Mentoring:                  Training and supervision will be provided by postdocs in both labs.

Student stipend:         $15/h
Course credit:              no

Application information:

Interested candidates should contact Katja Taute (taute@rowland.harvard.edu) with a CV and a short statement of background and motivation.

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in Psychiatry/Psychology, Pizzagalli Lab, at McLean Hospital

 

Contact informationPI: Emily Belleau, Ph.D. and Diego Pizzagalli, Ph.D. will serve as supervisors. Dr. Belleau is a clinical psychologist and researcher. She is an Instructor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and an Assistant Neuroscientist at McLean Hospital. Dr. Pizzagalli is a Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and a Board of Honors Tutor member in the Psychology Department at FAS. He is the Director of the Laboratory for Affective and Translation Research (LATN), and the Center for Depression, Anxiety and Stress Research (CDASR) at McLean Hospital, which is where the research volunteer will work. McLean is the primary psychiatric teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School, and is recognized as the #1 Best Psychiatric Hospital in the country by U.S. News and World Report.

Contact for applicants: David Crowley, Manager of Lab Research Operations; phone: 617-855-4432, email: djcrowley@mclean.harvard.edu, address: McLean Hospital, 115 Mill St., Belmont, MA, 02478.

Website: cdasr.mclean.harvard.edu

Project description and duties:

Volunteer positions are available in the Laboratory for Affective and Translational Neuroscience (LATN), at McLean Hospital, directed by Diego A. Pizzagalli, Ph.D.  LATN is part of McLean’s Center for Depression, Anxiety and Stress Research, which embraces a multi-disciplinary approach to improve our understanding of the psychological, environmental, and neurobiological factors associated with affective disorders (http://cdasr.mclean.harvard.edu/).

We are currently seeking volunteers to help with a study in which we are examining the impact of stress on neurobiology in adolescents, and what makes some teens more vulnerable to experiencing depression. Adolescence is a particular sensitive window of development that is marked by heightened stress reactivity and vulnerability to developing mental health problems, such as depression. Accordingly, understanding stress-related neural dysfunction may be a valuable pathway for identifying individuals at risk for prolonged/recurrent major depressive episodes and facilitating ways to prevent MDD relapse at a critical developmental stage. With the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we are examining neural functioning before, during, and after stress in female adolescents with and without MDD. Another aim is to investigate whether stress-related neural abnormalities in those with MDD predict changes in depressive symptoms three-month post-scan. Understanding neural dysfunction related to poor stress recovery in adolescent MDD may have implications for establishing MDD biomarkers that lead to earlier detection and intervention.

Volunteers will be involved in all aspects of the research including participant recruitment, observing and conducting phone screening, helping run participants through the study pipeline including conducting informed consent and guiding teen participants through the “mock scanner” to help make them comfortable with the scanning environment, as well as database management. The opportunity to learn and conduct data analyses are also available (questionnaire data, behavioral data, fMRI) , but will require a greater level of  time commitment to the lab in order to be trained on these types of analyses. Skills required: Candidates must be highly motivated and reliable. You will receive in-depth training in all the skills you’ll need to contribute to the research project. Our research focuses on humans with clinical mental health concerns, so experience working with human subjects in a research or therapeutic setting is preferred.  Experience conducting laboratory research in any discipline will also be desirable. 

Learning outcomes: laboratory skills, research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.  Specific learning outcomes will vary depending on your time commitment and on what interests and talents you bring with you.

Time commitment: . It is expected that volunteers will work 8-15 hours a week in the lab. Students will receive a considerable amount of training, so preference is given to applicants who can return for more than one semester. Traveling to and from McLean Hospital takes an additional 35 minutes via public transportation, so students should consider whether this can fit in their schedule before they apply.

Mentoring: Mentoring is an important part of the lab’s mission.  Students will work directly and continuously with Dr. Belleau, under the guidance of Dr. Pizzagalli. 

Student stipend: Our laboratory cannot provide any payment.  Students may apply to a variety of Harvard resources for supplemental financial support.

Course credit: Students may apply for course credit in PSY 910r or Neuorbio 98r.

Application information: Please visit the  “Current Openings” page on the lab’s web site at https://cdasr.mclean.harvard.edu/about/current-openings-2/to download the LATN Student Visitor Application form, and then send the completed form along with a copy of your CV to David Crowley at djcrowley@mclean.harvard.edu.

 

 

Undergraduate Volunteer Research Assistant Opportunity in Psychiatry/Psychology, Pizzagalli Laboratory at McLean Hospital and HMS

Contact information

PI: Matthew Sacchet, Ph.D., Instructor in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, is the supervising faculty member. McLean Hospital biography: https://www.mcleanhospital.org/biography/matthew-sacchet

Senior supervising faculty member: Diego Pizzagalli, Ph.D., Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, is the senior supervising faculty member. Dr. Pizzagalli is a Board of Honors Tutor member in the Psychology Department at FAS.

Research location: Laboratory for Affective and Translation Research (LATN) in the Center for Depression, Anxiety and Stress Research (CDASR; directed by Dr. Pizzagalli) at McLean Hospital. McLean Hospital is the primary psychiatric teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School and is recognized as the #1 Best Psychiatric Hospital in the country by U.S. News and World Report.

Contact for applicants: David Crowley, Manager of LATN Research Operations; phone: 617-855-4432, email: djcrowley@mclean.harvard.edu, address: McLean Hospital, 115 Mill St., Belmont, MA, 02478.

Laboratory website: cdasr.mclean.harvard.edu

Project title  Mindfulness meditation and mental health

Description of project

Mindfulness meditation is a contemplative practice that targets the development of present-centered awareness and acceptance of psychological phenomena. Mindfulness is widespread in clinical psychology, the workplace, and general wellness and is associated with myriad health-related benefits. Mindfulness meditation-based therapies have been shown to be helpful for reducing depression and anxiety, in both community and psychiatric samples. To date little is understood regarding the psychological and biological mechanisms of action of mindfulness meditation for depression and anxiety. Understanding the mechanisms of action of mindfulness promises to provide a foundation for improved treatments. The objective of the current study is to advance our understanding of mindfulness meditation for depression and anxiety by investigating cognitive, affective, behavioral, neural, and psychoneuroimmunological (including epigenetic) effects of mindfulness practice. The project includes acquisition of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) data from depressed and anxious patients before and after they have completed a mindfulness-based intervention or one of several control interventions. The project promises to provide new insights into the psychological and biological mechanisms of action of mindfulness meditation for depression and anxiety that will contribute to improved mindfulness-based treatments and thus better outcomes and reduced suffering for individuals with mental illness.

Description of student involvement

Interested students may become involved in this study in a number of ways across all phases of the research study, including but not limited to supporting aspects of protocol development, participant recruitment, and data acquisition (e.g., collecting EEG, blood samples, questionnaires, interviews from study participants, behavioral and cognitive tests). Depending on the interests, goals, and skills of prospective students and the duration of involvement it may be possible for students to take on additional opportunities including data analysis, software programming, paper writing, and increasingly self-directed projects. Such projects may be based on the current study dataset or datasets previously collected. If of interest to the participating student, the faculty project leader is prepared to provide mentorship toward application to graduate programs, including in research and/or clinical fields.

Skills required: Candidates must be highly motivated and reliable. Students will receive in-depth training in all necessary skills to contribute to the research project. Our research focuses on humans with clinical mental health concerns, so experience working with human subjects in a research or therapeutic setting is preferred while not required. Experience conducting laboratory research in any discipline is also preferred while not required.

Learning outcomes: Students will gain experience with laboratory and research skills including within the domains of study design, data analysis, presentation, and scientific writing. Specific learning outcomes will vary depending on what role the student contributes, which will be dictated by the student’s interests and talents. See also above section “Description of student involvement”.

Time commitment: Volunteers are expected to contribute 10 to 15 hours per week for at least two semesters.  Students will receive considerable training, so preference will be made for applicants who can contribute for two or more semesters. Traveling to and from McLean Hospital may take an additional 35 minutes via public transportation, so students should consider whether this can fit in their schedule before they apply.

Mentoring: Mentoring is an important part of the lab’s mission. Students will work directly and continuously with Dr. Sacchet, under the senior guidance of Dr. Pizzagalli. Students will be encouraged to attend general lab meetings as well.

Student stipend: Our laboratory cannot provide any payment.  Students may apply to a variety of Harvard resources for supplemental financial support (e.g., Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities)

Course credit: Students may apply for course credit (e.g., PSY 910r or Neuorbio 98r).

Application information: Please visit the  “Current Openings” page on the lab’s web site at https://cdasr.mclean.harvard.edu/about/current-openings-2/ to download the LATN Student Visitor Application form, and then send the completed form along with a copy of your CV to David Crowley at djcrowley@mclean.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in the Henske Lab, HMS
PI: Dr. Elizabeth (Lisa) Henske, MD, Professor of Medicine
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Location: 45 Francis Street, Thorn Building, (Elevator D) Room 826, Boston, MA 02115
Website: https://www.henskelab.org/

Project Description: The Henske Laboratory is focused on the cell biology and biochemistry of rare genetic diseases, including Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) and lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).  Dr. Henske is a medical oncologist who follows LAM and TSC patients in addition to directing a research laboratory.  Our mission is to translate research discoveries into improved care as quickly as possible, to improve the lives of those affected by these devastating diseases.  TSC is an autosomal dominant syndrome causing seizures, autism, and tumors of the brain, heart, kidney, skin, and lung.  LAM is a destructive, progressive cystic lung disease that affects almost exclusively women and can lead to lung collapse and respiratory failure.  LAM is caused by TSC2 gene mutations in benign tumor cells that metastasize to the lung.   The TSC proteins inhibit the activity of the mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) kinase.

Some of the research topics covered in the lab:

•          Employing high-throughput screening methodologies to identify novel therapies for TSC and LAM.

•          Developing relevant in vivo models that recapitulate the clinical manifestations of TSC and LAM

•          Understanding how benign-appearing LAM cells metastasize to the lungs

•          Understanding the role of estrogen in the female-predominance of LAM

•          Studying how nutrients, such as lipids, glucose, and amino acids, are utilized by tumor cells that are deficient in the TSC2 protein

Links to published manuscripts and reviews describing our work:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27226234

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27753446

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28498820

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28512249

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25185584

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25780943

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24296756

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21746920

Skills required: Prior research experience preferred but not required.

Learning outcome: students will acquire skills in experimental design, experimental techniques, lab data analysis, presentations, and scientific writing.  If warranted based on their contributions, students will be co-authors on scientific manuscripts. 

Number of hours: negotiable

Mentoring: Mentoring will be primarily provided by postdoctoral fellows in the laboratory. The student      will also have regular meetings with Dr. Henske, and attend weekly lab meetings and journal clubs and will have opportunities to present at the lab meetings and journal clubs.

Funding:  The Laboratory does not have funds to pay student stipends, but students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or  register for a research course credit.

To Apply: Please email your resume to Dr. Henske at (ehenske@bwh.harvard.edu) with a cover letter including a brief outline of your interests, goals, and anticipated time availability.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Chung Lab, Mass Eye & Ear

Contact information: Yoojin Chung, PhD yoojin_chung@meei.harvard.edu
Eaton-Peabody laboratories Mass Eye & Ear
243 Charles St Boston MA 02114
https://researchers.masseyeandear.org/details/294

Project description and duties: Ongoing research in our group is aimed at improving perceptual performance with cochlear implants, particularly binaural implants. While normal-hearing listeners excel at understanding speech in noisy and reverberant environments, hearing-impaired and cochlear-implant patients often have difficulties in these adverse environments, even if they do well when facing a single speaker in a quiet room. To understand these differences between normal listeners and cochlear implant will require an integrated knowledge of the auditory processing of speech, binaural processing in the auditory brainstem, and how these mechanisms are altered by development and pathology. We are currently looking for a student to assist with histological processing of brain and cochlea tissue harvested from animals with differing degree of auditory experience during development.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcomes: Students will learn techniques for histological processing of brain and cochlea including immunohistochemistry techniques. They can also participate in on-going neurophysiological experiments and assist with data analysis. There will be opportunities for presentation during the group meetings.

umber of hours: Flexible.

Mentoring: Students will be directly supervised by the PI. Students will be expected to attend bi-weekly group meetings, also encouraged to participate in journal club and department seminar series.

Student stipend: Students are welcome to volunteer, for funding please apply with the Harvard URAF fellowships: HCRP, PRISE, etc. Contact Research Advisor, Dr. A. Babakhanyan for more info at ababakhanyan@fas.harvard.edu

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Hasan’s Lab, HMS, MGH

Contact information: Prof. Tayyaba Hasan, Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, 40 Blossom Street, Bartlett Hall 314-B, Boston, MA 02114.

http://hasanlab.mgh.harvard.edu/ | http://wellman.massgeneral.org/faculty-hasan-pi.htm

Project description and duties: Photodynamic and Nanotechnologies for light-activated therapy- Therapeutics and Imaging

Most cancer-related deaths are associated with the multitude of disseminated metastatic lesions that occur throughout the body. These lesions are often far too small and widespread to detect and resect, and may become resistant to therapeutic intervention. Our long-term goal is to develop effective cancer therapy by using light-activated multifunctional drugs. Students will use state-of-the-art optical imaging to gain insights into the bio-physical barriers in drug delivery into tumors and learn synthesis of nanoscale drug carriers.

Project 1: Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumor-selective drug release. The Hasan lab recently developed a photoactivatable multi-inhibitor nano-liposome that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with photo-initiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumor regrowth and treatment escape signaling pathways. Students will test this technique on state-of-the-art tumor cell cultures to develop and optimize spatiotemporal control of drug release whilst reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

Project 2: Recent advances in 3-D cell cultures, organoids, and organ-on-chips promise to accelerate biomedical drug discovery without relying on experimental animals. The Hasan lab aims to develop, test, and apply various 3-dimensional tumor cell model for the development of photodynamic therapy. Students will conduct engineering molecular probes for multifocal imaging of complex biological samples and application of a unique video-rate hyperspectral microscopic imaging system.

Project 3: Study of photodynamic therapy induced immunological responses and development of high-resolution imaging.

This project is a unique combination of imaging and studying special effect of upregulation of immune system post photodynamic therapy treatment.

Project 4: Use of photochemical and photodynamic techniques for diagnostics and treatment of infections.

Students are encouraged to do a PUBMED search to look into these projects into bit more detail.  Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=tayyaba+hasan

Skills required: Students with previous research experience or no research experience, both are welcomed in our lab.

Learning outcomes:  Laboratory skills, research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

This opportunity will support career growth and provide with a sense of direction.

Number of hours/ Length of project: The work hours for the students are negotiable depending on the students’ interest, enthusiasm and performance. Their schedule will be considered while making this decision.

Mentoring: Students will be mentored by post-doctoral candidates in the laboratory.

The students can get involved in our weekly group meeting and other project related meetings. Students are required to be in constant touch with their mentors to resolve any issues or concerns, so to have a smooth internship and learning process.

Student stipend: Kindly apply for Harvard fellowships:https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Funding sources for undergraduates conducting term-time research include the Harvard College Research Program (Fall deadline 9/17/19), the Faculty Aide Program, and the Federal Work-Study Program.

Course credit: NA

Application information:  Email your resume to Bernadette Vijayakanthan (bvijayakanthan@mgh.harvard.edu) and Mallika Priya (mpriya@mgh.harvard.edu).

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Student Intern for Dr. Sansevere, Boston Children’s Hospital

 Contact information: Dr. Arnold Sansevere Department of Neurology Division of Epilepsy
333 Longwood Ave, 4th Floor  Boston, MA 02115
http://www.childrenshospital.org/research/researchers/s/arnold-sansevere

Project description and duties:

Electrographic seizures are common in critically ill neonates and children. Continuous EEG monitoring is necessary to their detection. In addition to the use of EEG for detection of seizures, the background provides important information for prognosis. Furthermore, advanced signal processing with quantitative EEG can aid in seizure detection and signals that indicate cerebral injury.

Student interns will abstract medical records of critically ill patients at high risk of seizure. Research places a focus on the impact of seizures, and seizure burden on developmental outcome. Our group in currently looking at the use of advanced signal processing to detect seizures and indicators of brain injury. The student will also be trained to interpret raw EEG and quantitative EEG in critically ill patients with a focus on indicators for seizure, development of seizure, and poor prognosis. The link below contains links to publications by Dr. Sansevere.

http://www.childrenshospital.org/research/researchers/s/arnold-sansevere

 Skills required:

  • Our lab accepts interns at all levels of study. We will train our interns on the specific projects.
  • Role primarily includes medical record abstraction
  • Includes screening for the appropriate targeted patient
  • Provides the experience of building a database and assisting with data entry using the RedCap database
  • No prior research experience required
  • Experience with REDCap is a plus

Learning outcomes:

  • Medical terminology
  • Clinical research skills and knowledge of good clinical practice
  • Data analysis methods using SPSS
  • Scientific writing of abstracts for professional conferences
  • Presentation of professional conference

Number of hours: Typically, student interns complete about 8-10 hours per week (during the school year), however we can always work with students to develop a schedule that fits with their academic commitments.

Mentoring: who will be mentoring the undergraduate, how often are mentorship meetings, and can the student attend group meetings?

Student interns will be under the direction of Dr. Sansevere, and will work with a postdoctoral clinical research fellow Dr. Melissa DiBacco. Students will meet with Dr. Sansevere weekly, and will work with Dr. DiBacco daily. Student interns are welcome to attend weekly lectures and monthly grand-round lectures if their schedules permit.

Student stipend: We do not have internal lab funding to pay a stipend. Students are encouraged to apply for fellowships through Harvard or other opportunities through organizations that would pay you a stipend. Harvard fellowship opportunities can be found at: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Course credit: Most interns in our lab are taking a research course for credit. We will need a letter of confirmation stating the dates of the semester and that the student will receive credit for the research conducted.

Application information: Interested applicants can send an email to Dr. Melissa DiBacco at Melissa.dibacco@childrens.harvard.edu explaining their interest and a copy of their resume.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, The Fruit Fly Fight Club, Kravitz Laboratory, HMS

Contact information: Edward A. Kravitz, Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School; contact: edward_kravitz@hms.harvard.edu ; Harvard Medical School, Armenise 1, rm 353; http://www.hms.harvard.edu/bss/neuro/kravitz/

Project description and duties: Male and female fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) fight in same sex pairings. Male fights go to higher intensity levels and end up in the formation of hierarchical relationships, while female fights commonly are at lower intensity levels and do not establish hierarchies. Our laboratory is using state of the art genetic tools that allow us to go to single identified neuron levels in brain in order to examine: the circuitry involved in triggering aggression in both sexes and examining the factors important in going to higher levels of intensity of aggression during fights. We manipulate all of these elements in freely behaving animals. Our plans for the immediate future are to record optogenetically from the neurons involved. As in all species, substances like amines (serotonin and dopamine) and peptides are important modulators of aggression. We have identified and partially worked out the circuitry involved with single pairs of serotonin neurons that facilitate going to higher levels of aggression in male fights (see Curr Biol. 2019 Jul 8;29(13):2145-2156)

Skills required: Desirable prerequisites are Introductory Genetics and Neurobiology, and we prefer students who might be interested in working on an honors thesis in the future. If interested please send a cv and names of potential recommenders to Dr. Kravitz.

Learning outcomes: Students will be given their own projects that will be part of the overall laboratory project. They will learn behavioral, genetic and immunohistochemical methods, present regular laboratory seminars, and attend local and national meetings in later years. Most students will generate a literature publication on their studies.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (paid or unpaid): We are interested in having one or two undergraduates working with us part time during the academic year (unpaid—up to 6 hrs per week) and full time (paid) in summers.

Mentoring: Students will work directly with a post-doctoral fellow and will be considered regular members of our laboratory.  This involves attending and delivering talks at weekly lab meetings, carrying fly stocks, performing and analyzing experiments, etc.

Student stipend: See above.

 

 

Research Opportunity to study the neuronal mechanisms underlying reproduction, Dr. Victor Navarro’s lab, BWH

Contact information:

Victor M Navarro. Medicine (Endocrinology), BWH 221 Longwood Ave, Boston

Tel: +1 617 525 6566 Fax: +1 617 582 6193

Email: vnavarro@bwh.harvard.edu Lab website: http://navarrolab.bwh.harvard.edu

Project description and duties:

Our lab focuses on the characterization of the central factors that regulate reproduction and metabolism including, but not limited to, Kiss1 neurons using a variety of genetic mouse models and viral delivery approaches. The student will be involved in the study of the neuronal mechanisms that the regulate reproductive axis, along with the neuronal circuitry that links different brain areas involved in reproduction. They will be involved in the development and maintenance of mouse colonies, performing anatomical studies, and the determination of gene and protein expression in the brain (PCR, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, etc.). Characterization of a number of biological parameters that define reproductive functions will be required (e.g. fertility assessments, daily monitoring of puberty onset, body weight, behavior, etc.). The student will be expected to work in collaboration with other members of the lab but in an independent manner. Students will be encouraged to present their data at local and regional meetings, analyze their data and prepare them for publication.

Skills requiredPassion, dedication, commitment and ability to work with live mice. No prior research experience is required. Some coursework in neuroscience or biology would be helpful. Experience with MATLAB is a plus but not mandatory.

Learning outcomesThe student that joins our lab is expected to acquire knowledge of neuroanatomy and physiology of the neuronal networks that govern the endocrine system. Students will gain experience in the handling of mice and maintenance of animal colonies as well as in the planning and performing of experimental protocols, analysis and interpretation of results and presentation of the data in lab meetings and conferences.

Number of hours students are expected to work:  Negotiable
MentoringThe student will be mentored by myself and senior postdocs in the lab. Weekly meetings will be held.
Does laboratory provide any funds to pay student’s stipendNo stipend is provided so the student is encouraged to apply for fellowships.
Email your resume to vnavarro@bwh.harvard.edu
 

 

 

Undergraduate research opportunity, Cognitive Neuroscience Group (Dr. Yael Arbel), MGH Institute of Health Professions

Contact information: Dr. Yael Arbel, co-director Cognitive Neuroscience Group, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH IHP, 79 13th Street, Boston, MA 02129. CNGLEAD@MGHIHP.EDU;  https://www.mghihp.edu/research/cognitive-neuroscience-group

Project description and duties: We are looking for a student to assist with data analysis of Eye-tracking and EEG data, and to conduct a literature review. No previous research experience is needed.

The Cognitive Neuroscience Group is a collaborative research group that uses behavioral and neuroscience methods to examine the relationship between learning, language ability, and cognitive factors. We use electrophysiological and eye tracking data to study typical and atypical learning across the lifespan and in different disorders (e.g., Developmental Language Disorder). The research assistant will have the opportunity to contribute to several research projects, including two federally funded projects focusing on the neural function associated with learning in typically developing children and children with developmental language disorders.

Duties: The research assistant will assist with data analysis of behavioral, eye-tracking, and EEG data, and will conduct a literature review related to attention and learning. EEG signal processing will include the use of Matlab based tool boxes for artifact detection/correction, latency jitter correction, and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). 

Skills required: excellent communication skills (verbal and written), background knowledge in cognitive neuroscience, ability to work independently and in a team. Preferred skills include: coding in Matlab, signal processing, eye-tracking data analysis, statistical analysis using SPSS or R, creating scripts in Excel and other programing. No research experience is required.

Learning outcome: The RA will receive training in data analysis of behavioral, EEG, and eye-tracking data. The RA will participate in weekly lab meetings that will include presentations by PIs, and students at all levels (PhD, graduate, undergraduate). The RA will gain understanding of research design related to the study of learning in individuals with typical and atypical cognitive profiles. The RA will have the opportunity to present at the biweekly CNG meetings and to participate in scientific writing

The RA is expected to work 10 hours per week on site. Our lab is located at the MGH Institute of Health Professions in the Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston.

Mentoring: The RA will be mentored by the Dr. Arbel and will interact with CNG members. The RA will attend weekly lab meetings, and weekly mentorship meetings with the PI.

Student stipend: Please apply for funding through the Harvard College Research Program (Fall deadline 9/17/19) https://uraf.harvard.edu/research-funding

 

 

Undergraduate research assistant, Dr. Aizenberg Lab, SEAS
Principal Investigator: Prof. Joanna Aizenberg
Amy Smith Berylson Professor of Materials Science
Professor of Chemistry & Chemical Biology
John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Email: jaiz@seas.harvard.edu
Lab website: https://aizenberglab.seas.harvard.edu/

Project 1. A water droplet deposited on a lubricated surface forms an annular wetting ridge near its base by syphoning oil from its vicinity. The shape of the wetting ridge and its dependence on viscosity, lubrication film thickness and droplet size is not fully understood. This work experimentally characterizes the dependence of the shape of the wetting ridge to the aforementioned parameters. The outcomes of this study will provide new understanding in the mechanics/motion of water droplets on lubricated surfaces.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcome: Fluid mechanics, drop shape analyzer, image analysis, Matlab

Number of hours: Negotiable (2-4 h/wk expected)

Mentor: Solomon Adera  Postdoc (The Aizenberg Group)  Email: sadera@seas.harvard.edu

Funding availability: Yes. The student can also get course credit.

If interested, please email Solomon Adera (sadera@seas.harvard.edu)

 

Project 2. SLIPS condensation

Abstract: Vapor condensation is a ubiquitous phenomenon both in nature and in industry. In nature, we observe condensation when dew forms on a lawn grass in the morning hours. In industry, it is a useful in power generation, distillation, air conditioning, environmental control and refrigeration systems. Due to the high surface energy of metals, vapor condenses in a filmwise mode where the condensate forms a continuous liquid film that creates a thermal barrier. If the condensing surface is coated with a low surface energy promoter material, discrete droplets form, grow and shed rapidly due to gravity, allowing for the renucleation of small low-thermal-resistance droplets, in what is termed as dropwise condensation (DWC). Heat transfer rates during dropwise condensation in a saturated environment is 5-7 times higher than the traditional filmwise condensation (FWC). However, promoter coatings are not durable under vapor saturation conditions. Additionally, chemical and topographical inhomogeneities create defects where droplets can pin and transition to FWC. Similarly, microstructured surfaces are generally not suited for continuous dropwise condensation, as condensate can nucleate within the microstructures and remain in the wetting Wenzel state even after coalescence and growth. Only when the surface has nanoscale roughness (~ nm), can droplets form in the favorable non-wetting east-to-remove Cassie-Baxter state. Even then, dropwise and jumping droplet condensation can be achieved only for low supersaturations due to the presence of coalescence and flooding within structures once droplet nucleation densities approach the density of the nanoscale features. Recent advances in microfabrication techniques and functional coating enables a new class of surfaces termed as slippery liquid infused porous surfaces (SLIPS), which are suitable for dropwise condensation of both water and low surface tension fluids. Due to the absence of defects on SLIPS, condensate droplets have extremely low contact angle hysteresis, leading to enhanced shedding and rapid clearing of nucleation sites which increases the heat transfer coefficient. Additionally, the ultralow surface energy of the infused liquid, coupled with its low adhesion and atomically smooth interface enables stable dropwise condensation of low surface tension fluids, which is not possible with traditional hydrophobic promoter coatings. In this work, we will investigate the heat transfer coefficient of FWC, DWC, SLIPS condensation in a pure saturated vapor environment where noncondensable gases are absent.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcome: Heat transfer, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, Matlab

Number of hours: Negotiable (2-4 h/wk expected)

Mentor: Solomon Adera, postdoc (The Aizenberg Group), Email: sadera@seas.harvard.edu

Funding availability: Yes. The student can also get course credit.

If interested, please email Solomon Adera (sadera@seas.harvard.edu)

 

Project 3. Water harvesting

Abstract: Water is an abundant natural resource that covers three quarters of the earth’s surface. However, two-thirds of the world’s population is experiencing water shortage as per the 2017 report by the World Health Organization. In a similar report, the United Nations predicted that by 2030, 40% of the world population will experience water shortage. As climate change causes drought and desertification and global water consumption continues to rise due to higher standards of living, the population facing water scarcity is projected to reach 5 billion by 2050. Regions currently considered water-rich will experience water shortage in the coming few decades. This has renewal interest in atmospheric water harvesting (AWH) technology, which is the capture/collection of water that is present in ambient air either as vapor or micro droplets. Recently, enhanced atmospheric water harvesting inspired by the Namib desert beetle has been reported. A millimeter-size bump promotes droplet growth by directing vapor transport towards its apex (i.e., by creating a vapor concentration gradient that assists dewing). Furthermore, if the bumps are micro/nanostructured, functionalized and impregnated with a thin layer of lubrication film, droplet shedding can be facilitated. In this work, we experimentally investigate the effect of the dimensions of the millimeter-size bumps and their spacing on water harvesting.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcome: Fluid mechanics, thermodynamics

Number of hours: Negotiable (2-4 h/wk expected)

Mentor: Solomon Adera, postdoc (The Aizenberg Group), Email: sadera@seas.harvard.edu

Funding availability: Yes. The student can also get course credit.

If interested, please email Solomon Adera (sadera@seas.harvard.edu)

 

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Chen Lab, Schepens Eye Research Institute, MEE/MGH

Contact information:  Dong Feng Chen, MD, PhD
Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School
Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear, 20 Staniford Street, Boston, MA 02114
Email: Dongfeng_chen@meei.harvard.edu  Tel: 617-912-7490
https://www.masseyeandear.org/research/investigators/c/chen-dong-feng

Project description and duties: 

The project will be focused on the understanding of mechanisms and immune regulation of neurodegeneration associated with retinal disease or injury and to develop a regenerative strategy for treating these disease conditions and reversing vision loss. The duties of the student may involve protein and DNA isolation and analysis, flow cytometry, cell culture, immunohistochemistry, bioinformatic and morphometric analysis, etc. See link to a representative published manuscript as below:

 https://www-ncbi-nlm-nih-gov.ezp-prod1.hul.harvard.edu/pmc/articles/PMC6086830/

Skills required: Are students expected to have any particular laboratory skills, if so which ones? If no prior research experience is required, state so to encourage applications from new undergraduate researchers.

No prior research experience is required but preferred.

Learning outcomes: laboratory skills, research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

The student will be trained for laboratory skills including protein and DNA isolation and analysis, flow cytometry, cell culture, immunohistochemistry, bioinformatic and morphometric analysis, as well as learn to study design, data analysis, and presentations.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if these are negotiable, state so):  negotiable.

Mentoring: Students will work closely on a daily basis with a senior or postdoctoral fellow in the lab; in addition, the PI will meet with the student weekly or as often as needed. The student will be required to attend the weekly lab meetings and give reports as well as formal presentations at the lab meeting.

Student stipend: Students are encouraged to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities or Faculty Aide Program, Federal Work-Study Program

Course credit: Students can also conduct research for course credit (however, a student cannot earn course credit and be paid a stipend in the same semester).

Application information: Email your resume to Dr. Dong Feng Chen at Dongfeng_chen@meei.harvard.edu

 

 

Clinical Research Experience at the Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Institute at McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Contact information: Martha J. Falkenstein, PhD  Staff Psychologist
Administrative Director, Office of Clinical Assessment and Research
McLean Hospital OCD Institute
Instructor in Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School
EMAIL: mfalkenstein@mclean.harvard.edu
Lab website: https://www.mcleanhospital.org/programs/ocd-institute#research

Project description and duties:

The Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Institute (OCDI) at McLean Hospital is accepting applications for Student Visitors and/or Academic Credit Students interested in receiving clinical research training. The student will work with Martha Falkenstein, PhD, Jacob Nota, PhD, and Jason Krompinger, PhD, members of the research and clinical staff and faculty in Harvard Medical School. The student will be a part of the OCDI’s ongoing clinical research examining mechanisms underlying OCD and related conditions, as well as the effectiveness of our intensive/residential cognitive behavioral treatment program. The OCDI’s research mission is to excel in naturalistic clinical research that will directly improve the effectiveness of treatment for OCD and related conditions. For more information about the type of work we do, please see: https://www.mcleanhospital.org/programs/ocd-institute#research

This position would be an excellent fit for applicants interested in obtaining doctoral training in clinical or counseling psychology or psychiatry, and/or preparation for research assistant positions after graduation. Mentorship is an important part of our mission, and our previous students have been accepted into top graduate schools and earned authorship on presentations and papers.

Principal experiences include:

  • running the clinical participants through various study protocols
  • assisting in data management and archival data collection tasks related to the research program
  • assisting with literature searches, manuscript preparation, and presentations
  • participating in weekly research meetings; the student will meet with the principal investigators in both one-on-one and group formats

Prior experience with research and clinical populations is preferred, but not required.

We are located at the North Belknap building on McLean’s campus, accessible via MBTA 73 bus or Fitchburg Line commuter rail to Waverley Square stop. McLean is a short walk or is accessible via the McLean shuttle.

Skills required: Prior experience with research and clinical populations is preferred, but not required.

Learning outcomes: Research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, scientific writing, and learning how to interact with research participants who are patients in our psychiatric hospital program.

Number of hours At least 8 hours per week

Mentoring: who will be mentoring the undergraduate, how often are mentorship meetings,  and can the student attend group meetings?

Student stipend: Please note that we do not have the funds to pay students’ stipends and encourage students to apply for any relevant fellowships or register for research course credit.

Course credit: We can offer course credit

Application information: To apply, please send cover letter and CV/resume to: mfalkenstein@mclean.harvard.edu We will begin reviewing applicants for Fall semester immediately.

 

 

 

Undergraduate Research Assistant, Walsh Lab, Boston Children's Hospital

Laboratory Description: The Walsh Lab focuses on the genetics of neurodevelopment, and has previously identified genes through genetic sequencing and characterization of rare patients with cerebral malformations. The lab also focuses on the basic biology of neurodevelopment and uses combined sequencing tools to ask questions about neurodevelopment, such as about lineage of specific cell types. Currently seeking motivated undergraduate research assistant to join our team, we are located in Longwood Medical Area in the CLS building, and have had multiple undergraduate research assistants before.

http://www.walshlab.org/

Positon Description:

-       10-12 hrs/week for 2 semesters, with possible opportunity for full-time research work during summer if interested

-     Volunteer opportunity, but can be paid if Federal Work-Study student, will assist with applying for research funding for summer students; could also receive course credit for work

-       Work with MD/PhD student on specific, developed project on the genetics of neurodevelopment using mouse model; opportunity for co-authorship, and to develop personal project

-     Will be mentored directly by MD/PhD student in laboratory, but will also meet with PI on occasion

-       No previous research experience required, though previous laboratory experience is a plus; should have some background in science courses (intro biology and intro biology laboratory). We will teach you all the skills you need.

-     Ideal position for students interested in preparing for MD/PhD, PhD, or interested in preparing for MD programs with an interest in basic science research

-       Keywords: Neurodevelopment, Genetics, Imaging/Microscopy

If you are interested, please send and email with a CV to Christopher.Walsh@childrens.harvard.edu, and shyam_akula@hms.harvard.edu

 

 

Advancing coil design in micromagnetic stimulation, Dr. Bonmassar Lab, AA. Martinos Center Department of Radiology Harvard Medical School Massachusetts General Hospital

Micromagnetic stimulation (uMS) has several advantages over electrical stimulation. First, uMS does not require charge-balanced stimulation waveforms as in electrical stimulation. In uMS, neither sinks nor sources are present when a current is induced by the time-varying magnetic field, thus mMS does not suffer from charge buildup as can occur with electrical stimulation. Second, magnetic stimulation via µMS is capable of activating neurons with specific axonal orientations. Moreover, as the probes can be completely insulated from the brain tissue, we expect to significantly reduce the problem of excessive power deposition into the tissue during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). uMS technology was first developed in our laboratory and is entirely based on commercial components off the shelf, which are readily available to researchers. However, commercial inductors are designed to maximize efficiency (Q-factor), which consists in trapping the generated magnetic field to minimize its losses. Furthermore, they do not allow for multiple coil design in small and complex 3D geometries as it is often needed in neuroscience applications.We will show uMS coils developments based on a new thin-film technology at the Center for Nanoscale Systems (CNS) Harvard University.

Requirements: The research is entirely performed at the Center for Nanoscale Systems (CNS), which requires training to gain access. More information on CNS can be found on the website: https://cns1.rc.fas.harvard.edu/. The skills that will be acquired by the students after completing the training and after performing research work are similar to the ones needed to manufacture MEMS. Students interested in this type of research and working at CNS are invited to contact us to learn the various options offered.

To apply contact: Dr. Giorgio Bonmassar, giorgio.bonmassar@mgh.harvard.edu
AbiLab Building 75, Third Ave Charlestown, MA 02129 Tel. (617) 726-0962 Fax (617) 726-7422
http://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/abilab/

 

 

Posted Sep 3, 2019

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in 3D Bioprinting, Prof. Jennifer Lewis’ Lab, Harvard University

PI Name and Affiliation: Prof. Jennifer Lewis - Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences & The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering

Lab Website: https://lewisgroup.seas.harvard.edu/

Lab Location: 58 Oxford St. Cambridge, MA 02138

Project Description: 3D bioprinting of cancer-on-chip models

Skills Required:

·         Eagerness to learn.

·         Ability to work in a fast-paced laboratory setting.

·         Previous cell culture experience is preferable.

Learning Outcomes: The undergraduate researcher would be expected to assist in the bioprinting of 3D cancer models and gradually take on an independent project. Laboratory skills will include immunostaining, confocal microscopy, image analysis, and flow cytometry.

Number of hours: Minimum of 10-12 hours per week with at least one 4 hour block of time.

Length of the project: At least 6 months, and students who can commit to Summer 2020 would be highly preferred.

Mentoring: The undergraduate researcher will work closely with Postdoctoral Fellow Dr. Daniel Reynolds.

Student Stipend: This is an unpaid position. Interested students are encouraged to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities or research course credit.

Application information: please send CV/Resume to Dr. Daniel Reynolds at dreynolds@seas.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate research opportunity in Cancer Biology with the Letai Laboratory

Contact information: Anthony Letai, Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School.  anthony_letai@dfci.harvard.edu. Located in Mayer Building in Longwood area.  https://letailab.dana-farber.org/

Project description and duties: Identifying therapeutic vulnerabilities in primary patient tumors. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25723171

Skills required: Some experience in mammalian cell culture preferred.

Learning outcomes: Mammalian cell culture, high throughput fluorescent imaging, automated image analysis.

Number of hours Negotiable

Mentoring: Tony Letai, MD, PhD, and Patrick Bhola, PhD

Student stipend: Not for school year.  Yes for summer job. Encourage application for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Course credit: Will support if student arranges it.

Application information: Please email resume to anthony_letai@dfci.harvard.edu and patrick_bhola@dfci.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity with the Stroke research, HSPH

Contact information: Ankur Pandya, PhD, Health Policy and Management (HSPH), anpandya@hsph.harvard.edu, 718 Huntington Ave 2nd floor (Longwood), https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/ankur-pandya/

Project description and duties: We are looking for a student to join the Stroke microsimulation for Health outcomes and Interventions to Evaluate policies for Long-term Decision-making (SHIELD) TEAM.
Stroke is a leading cause of death, disability, and healthcare costs in the United States. We are developing and applying the SHIELD model to quantify the key tradeoffs among health benefits, risks, and costs for any feasible stroke prevention or treatment policies. Example publications:

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2702211

https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0148106

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2396476

Skills required: No prior research experience is required. Familiarity with working with data, coding in R or C++, and literature reviews could help.

Learning outcomes: Public health research skills such as cost-effectiveness analysis and risk prediction modeling study design, in addition to essential research skills such as literature reviews and scientific manuscript/presentation preparation. Note we are not a wet lab nor do we conduct any research with human subjects -- instead, we work with secondary data and simulation modeling to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of stroke prevention and treatment policies.

Number of hours: 5 hours/week for at least 2 semesters (summer included).

Mentoring: The undergraduate will work closely with Dr. Pandya and Harvard PhD students on the project in addition to several academic physicians from Harvard Medical School and Weill Cornell Medical College who collaborate with the SHIELD modeling team. Student can attend weekly group research meetings, and have mentoring meetings 2-4 times per month with Dr. Pandya.

Student stipend: We can pay $15-20 per hour depending on tasks being performed.

Course credit: No expected to be applicable unless circumstances call and allow for it.

Application information: Email your resume and a short statement of interest to Dr. Pandya at anpandya@hsph.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Hodi Lab, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

PI: F. Stephen Hodi, M.D., Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Dana 5th floor

Email: Stephen_hodi@dfci.harvard.edu

Telephone: (617) 632-5053

Description of the project and duties:

Our laboratory investigates human immunology and the development of immune therapies to treat cancer.  Two primary areas of potential projects and investigation exist. 

The first is to conduct screening and functional studies utilizing samples from patients receiving immune therapy to dissect what characteristics are involved with effective treatment and resistant mechanisms to immune therapy.  This involves standard and developed techniques assessing peripheral blood and biopsied tumor tissues.  Work will include analyses of peripheral blood specimens by CyTof to determine immunologic changes and competence.  Much of the work is utilizing samples from patients receiving immune checkpoint blockade.  This work may also include computational biology analyses working with data scientists to understand novel patterns of biologic responses from the datasets generated.

The second project involved improving our understanding of the interactions of angiogenesis (new blood vessel formation) and immune regulation.  Factors that are involved in making new blood vessels suppress particular parts of the immune system.  The blood vessels are also the gatekeepers in allowing immune cells to home into the tumor microenvironment.  Through various serologic screening methods we are able to identify candidate protein targets that have the potential dual roles of promoting new blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) and at the same time suppress the immune responses against tumors.   The laboratory efforts will involve assessing such factors with the goal to develop combinatorial approaches to treat patients with cancer.  Basic techniques of immunoblotting, cell culture may be used.  In addition, working with biomedical engineers to establish and utilize in vitro 3-dimensional platforms to study the effects of these agents on immune cell trafficking across blood vessels as well as the effects on innate immunity (e.g. myeloid cells).

The students with these projects will be conducting experiments to answer these questions.  This work would include and not limited to cell culture, immune assessments including flow cytometry, CyTof, immuno-blotting, cytokine functional assays, ELISAs, ELISPOTs, computer algorithms for computational biology working with data scientists.  It would be expected that the students will be taught how to perform these techniques and learn how to conduct this work with supervision.  Depending on the interest, a student may lead a project or portion of a project.  The student may also have opportunities to present at lab meetings or other scientific conferences, and become an author on publications.

•Skills required. (Are students expected to have any laboratory skills, if so what are they?) If no prior research experience is required, state so and it will encourage students to apply.

No prior research experience is necessary.

Learning outcome: laboratory skills, research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentations, scientific writing, etc.

The desire is for this experience to provide a foundation for developing laboratory technical skills, scientific methods, and experimental design.  In addition, exposure to the field of immunology and immune therapy.

 Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project (if it is negotiable, state so)

Understanding the schedules of students, this is flexible.  We have a variety of project opportunities where the hours and time commitment can vary while still being productive and educational.  It would be important to have some dedicated time period (e.g 3-4 hours) in order to plan and participate in experiments as part of the educational experience.

Mentoring: who will be mentoring student day to day, how often are mentorship meetings, etc.

The student will have a PhD level staff scientist to guide, oversee, and instruct the daily activities.  The student would meet to review progress and for teaching every 1-2 weeks with the laboratory lead.

 Does laboratory provide any funds to pay student’s stipend? If not state that students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

A moderate stipend may be possible and happy to discuss.  Encourage if interested and time permissive to consider research course credit with committed time for scientific development.

What information students need to submit and contact information for submitting this information: (ex. Email your resume to Dr. Smith at ….)

Please feel free to email inquiries and resume if available to Dr. Hodi at Stephen_hodi@DFCI.Harvard.edu

 

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Schulman Lab, BIDMC

Contact information:  Sol Schulman, MD, PhD.

Divisions of Hemostasis and Thrombosis and Hematology and Oncology
Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School
Center for Life Sciences, Room 950 
3 Blackfan Circle  Boston, MA 02215  sschulm1@bidmc.harvard.edu
https://hemostasis.bidmc.org/people/sol-schulman-md-phd/

Project description and duties:

Tissue factor (TF) binds blood coagulation factor VII/VIIa to initiate blood coagulation in humans. Inappropriate TF procoagulant activity underlies substantial human suffering, including that due to myocardial infarction, venous thromboembolism, cancer-associated thrombosis, and stroke. TF expression and activity must therefore be carefully regulated in vascular tissues to enable hemostasis following injury but prevent pathologic thrombosis. Despite decades of close investigation, the mechanisms by which TF expression and procoagulant activity are regulated on the vascular cell surface remain incompletely understood. We combine functional genomics, human and rodent genetics, cell biology, and protein biochemistry to dissect the TF-dependent initiation of blood coagulation. Because the contribution of cellular TF is not captured by clinical coagulation testing, these critical modifiers of human bleeding and thrombotic risk remain undetected in human populations.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required, though always welcome.  Additional opportunities are available for students with a background in computer programming (ie python).

Learning outcomes: Students will learn standard and state of the art laboratory techniques and analytical methods.  Students will be encouraged to take ownership of a feasible project with close mentorship and a goal to develop increasing independence over time as skills develop.  Students will gain experience presenting data in written and oral form.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project.  Hours expected are variable.  In general it is expected that more senior students will have more time to commit to the laboratory during the academic year.  Committed students early in their training are especially encouraged, particularly if they seek to perform paid research over summers with the goal that the work will develop into a research for credit and thesis project in the junior/senior year.

Mentoring: who will be mentoring the undergraduate, how often are mentorship meetings, and can the student attend group meetings? Dr. Schulman will be the primary source of mentorship with weekly meetings and regular availability on demand.  Additional laboratory staff will provide a valuable resource for supplemental training regarding specialized techniques, etc. Students will be encouraged to attend and present at group and divisional meetings.

Student stipend: Can the research group pay a stipend to the student?

Students will not be paid during the academic year, but will be assisted in applying for summer research funding and can be supported through alternative sources if necessary.

Course credit: Another potential option for some students (typically juniors or seniors) is to conduct research for course credit; however, a student cannot earn course credit and be paid a stipend in the same semester.

My goal is that students will perform research for credit in the Junior and Senior year.

Application information: Detail the information students need to submit and the contact information for submitting this information:

Interested applicants should send your resume to Dr. Schulman at sschulm1@bidmc.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity at Spaulding Hospital Cambridge INSPIRE Lab for sensorimotor rehabilitation engineering

Dr. Randy Trumbower, PT, PhD; Asst Professor, Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School, Co-Director, Spinal Cord Injury Division

Contact: Stella Barth, clinical research assistant sbarth@partners.org 617-952-6822

Spaulding Hospital Cambridge, 1575 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138  (half a mile down the street from the Science Center, also accessible via the MBTA 69 bus)

www.inspire-lab.org/

http://spauldingrehab.org/research-and-clinical-trials/INSPIRE_Lab/

Description of the project and duties: Specific projects for students are flexible and will depend on student interests and current staff projects; this is a dynamic and multidisciplinary lab that brings together physical therapy and engineering to better understand motor recovery after neurological injury

Observational and hands-on research experience are available; interested students will have the opportunity to interact with clinical research participants during study visits

Hiring for term-time, summer, or both

http://spauldingrehab.org/research-and-clinical-trials/INSPIRE_Lab/research

Skills required: No prior research experience necessary, just enthusiasm for the mission of the lab: to INSPIRE persons living with paralysis to move

All volunteers must complete onboarding through Spaulding Rehabilitation Network and online CITI training

Learning outcomes: Students will gain exposure to multiple ongoing clinical trials involving motor recovery after spinal cord injury. Depending on student interests and current staff projects, students may gain exposure to the following: recruitment and screening of study participants, scheduling participants, maintaining IRB documents and participant data, EMG data collection and analysis, Optotrak motion capture system and force plate data analysis, physical therapy assessments, engineering, MATLAB, coding, monitoring vital signs, saliva and blood processing and storage, managing lab purchases and expenses

Research skills: study design, engineering for research, an understanding of how clinical trials involving human subjects are run, research specimen collection and processing, literature review, data processing and analysis

Number of hours: Flexible hours, term-time and summer opportunities available, part-time or full-time volunteering

We are particularly interested in students who are able to make a long-term commitment (at least a few months) to helping the lab

Mentoring: Students will work directly with one or more of the following depending on research interests and current staff projects: postdoctoral fellows, engineers, physical therapists, clinical research coordinator and or clinical research assistant

This is an unpaid research opportunity. Students are encouraged to apply to HCRP, fellowships, and other funding sources

Please submit contact information, a CV or resume, and a brief statement of interest or cover letter (including term-time / summertime availability) to Stella Barth at sbarth@partners.org

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Laboratory of Dr. Leo A. Kim, Mass. Eye and Ear/HMS

Contact information: Leo A. Kim, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Ophthalmology, leo_kim@meei.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: Our laboratory is currently looking for undergraduate researchers interested in investigating translationally relevant basic science questions looking at the pathophysiology of ocular diseasesSpecifically, our laboratory is interested in pathologic angiogenesis as it affects the retina and eye, as well as epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a complication of retinal detachment and eye traumaIn addition, we are investigating mechanisms of retinal toxicity of commonly used systemic medicationsThe research opportunity entails the use of both in vitro and animal models, as well as uncovering the cell signaling mechanisms underlying these processes in the eye. A list of laboratory publications is available herehttps://publons.com/researcher/1652681/leo-kim/

Skills required: No prior research experience is required.

Learning outcomes: Mentees will learn wet laboratory skills, study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours: Negotiable and variable as determined by the needs of the undergraduate.

Mentoring: Direct mentoring will be provided weekly by Dr. Leo Kim, a clinician-scientist at Mass. Eye and EarDaily mentoring by a senior research associate will be provided.

Student stipend: Previous undergraduate members of the laboratory have been awarded multiple research fellowships through Harvard and new students are encouraged to apply: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Course credit: Previous undergraduate members of the laboratory have received course credit.

Application information: Please email your contact information and a CV directly to Dr. Leo Kim at leo_kim@meei.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate research opportunity, Dr. Millers Lab, MEEI

Contact information: John B Miller at the Retina Department, John_Miller@meei.harvard.edu, Mass Eye and Ear 243 Charles Street and 800 Huntington Ave,

Project description and duties: Conducting clinical research at Mass Eye and Ear, which includes recruiting patients, conducting visual tests and learning about the most recent technological advances in eye imaging.

Skills required: No prior experience needed.

Learning outcomes: clinical research skills, study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours Students are expected to work between 10-20 hours a week

Mentoring: Undergraduate will be mentored by Dr. Miller and the research fellow in the group. Mentorship meetings will be once every two weeks and student can attend group meetings at Mass Eye and Ear to learn further about ophthalmology

Student stipend: Unpaid position

Course credit: Can earn a course credit

Application information: Please email your resume and questions to Raviv_katz@meei.harvard.edu

 

Research Assistant: Genetics and Molecular Biology of Brain Tumors, Badr lab, MGH

We are seeking volunteer-based Research Assistants to join our group focused on brain tumor research at Massachusetts General HospitalThe lab, which is part of the MGH Neurology Department, is located in Charlestown, MA (149 13th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129). Our lab is focused on studying molecular aspects governing self-renewal and tumor initiation in brain tumor initiating cells and using this knowledge to develop targeted therapies for brain tumors.

We are seeking highly motivated students looking to gain hands-on experience in molecular biology, cell biology and cancer genetics. The incumbent of this position will receive daily mentorship, will be encouraged to attend local conferences, and participate in lab meetings, journal clubs etc. The student researcher will work on studying gene regulation and the molecular biology of brain tumors, particularly in the context of lipid and fatty acid metabolism. Previous experience in molecular biology techniques is desired but not required. Part-time candidates should be able to commit to a minimum of 20 hours/week.

Some of the key techniques involved in this research include:

  1. Mammalian tissue culture, including maintenance and propagation of primary patient-derived cancer (stem) cells as well as common laboratory cell lines
  2. RNA or protein isolation from cells. Quantitative RT-PCR on RNA or western blots on proteins.
  3. Cell based assays such as cell viability, flow cytometry and measurement of bioluminescence or fluorescence
  4. Implantation of tumor cells in mice, optical imaging of tumors and testing of new therapeutics in these mouse models.

    For more information about the project, please check our recent manuscript here, or visit our webpage.

Interested individuals should email a Resume and a brief description of research interest and career goals to Dr. Christian E. Badr (badr.christian@mgh.harvard.edu).

 

Undergraduate research opportunities in climate dynamics, SEAS

Project description: Harvard undergraduate students with a strong background in physics and math are invited to join us for research projects either during the summer or the academic year. Students will learn about and participate in climate dynamics research activities, including the study of climate variability and climate change, both natural and man-caused. Possible project topics range from global warming, El Nino, the large-scale oceanic thermohaline circulation, and cold past climates such as ice ages, and the preceding warm climates with implications to future climate change as well. Typical projects involve python/ Matlab programming and the analysis of climate models or observations. More information on our web page: http://www.seas.harvard.edu/climate/eli/Level2/research.html
Skills required: Strong background in physics and math, e.g., physics 15abc and math/ applied math 21ab, plus preferably CS50 or equivalent. Additional more advanced physics and math/ applied math courses are also very helpful, e.g., 100 level physics courses and applied math 104, 105, 120 etc.
Learning outcomes: a combination of some of the followings: climate dynamics, programming, simulation, data science
Number of hours: flexible
Mentoring: PI plus potentially also a graduate student.
Stipend: yes, possibly via https://www.seas.harvard.edu/climate/eli/oceanography-committee/
Course credit: possible in principle
Application information: email with cv, list of courses, anything else that the student feels is relevant.
Please contactEli Tziperman
Prof of Oceanography and Applied Physics
Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences and School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
eli@eps.harvard.edu
http://www.seas.harvard.edu/climate/eli

 

 

Computational epigenomics Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Shi Lab, Boston Childrens Hospital

Contact information: Dr. Yang Shi, Cell Biology department, yang_shi@hms.harvard.edu, http://www.harvardshilab.org/

Project descriptionand duties: integrative epigenomic data analysis and computational tools development

Skills required: basic knowledges in molecular biology, (epi)genetics, statistics, programming skills (R, Shell)

Learning outcomes: abilities to analyse, represent big data, and generate hypothesis from big data .

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: negotiable

Mentoring: Dr. Lei Gu (Instructor at HMS, bioinformatician), how often are mentorship meetings is negotiable, and the student can attend group meetings.

Studentstipend: Encourage students to apply for Harvard fellowships

Application information: Email your resume to Dr. Gu at Leigu@broadinstitute.org

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Brain Aging and Dementia Laboratory, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH)

Contact information: David Salat, MGH Radiology, salat@nmr.mgh,harvard.edu, 149 13th St, Charlestown MA, https://scholar.harvard.edu/bandlab/home

Please note that this work is at the Charlestown campus of MGH and not main hospital. Directions to our Center can be found here:

https://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/about/directions

Project description and duties: Our laboratory examines brain imaging correlates of age related disease including cerebrovascular and Alzheimer's disease. Student researchers would become familiar with methods in neuroimaging research and clinical applications including involvement in participant study visits and would contribute to ongoing research through processing and analysis of existing and incoming imaging data.

See recent manuscripts from our laboratory:

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213158218301748

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5534349/

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213158217300220

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5321862/

Skills required: No prior research experience is required. Some experience in neuroscience, computer science, and/or biomedical engineering would be helpful but not required.

Learning outcomes: Neuroimaging data acquisition, processing, and analysis methods and basic and clinical applications of brain imaging, basic scripting/programming for data processing, neuroimaging research study design, study presentation, and scientific writing.

Number of hours It is expected that a minimum of 5 hours per week in the laboratory for one academic year would be necessary for training and completion of a limited project. However, there is some flexibility to this.

Mentoring: The PI (David Salat) will mentor in conjunction with senior lab members. The student would be invited to group meetings which occur twice weekly. Mentorship meetings are quarterly.

Student stipend: No stipend will be provided from the research group. We would encourage proposals for a stipend through the Faculty Aide Program, Federal Work-Study Program, or through Harvard fellowships.

Course credit: Work can be performed for course credit for qualifying course/programs.

Application information: Interested students should email their resume or questions to David Salat: salat@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Sabina Berretta Lab (Translational Neuroscience Lab., McLean Hospital)

Contact information: Sabina Berretta, M.D., s.berretta@mclean.harvard.edu, Division of Basic Neuroscience, McLean Hospital, https://www.mcleanhospital.org/biography/sabina-berretta

Project description and duties: Dr. Berretta and her group focus on the pathophysiology of psychiatric symptoms, using a combination of human brain postmortem work, in vitro and animal studies

Skills required: No prior research experience is required

Learning outcomes: laboratory skills including protein and mRNA detection and quantitative microscopy, research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours students are expected to work are negotiable. Because of the nature of our studies, we require at least one semester and no less than 12 hours/week

Mentoring: Students will meet with Dr. Berretta on a regular basis and will work alongside and under the direct supervision of a senior researcher. They are encouraged to attend weekly lab meetings and to present their work at least once during their internship. Other possibilities to present their research at McLean Research Day and Harvard Psychiatry Day (if appropriate) can also be considered.

Student stipend: A stipend may be available for non-credit students with some relevant lab experience. Students are also encouraged to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

 

Coursecredit: Another potential option is to conduct research for course credit; however, a student cannot earn course credit and be paid a stipend in the same semester.

Application information: Please email your resume and a cover letter to Dr. Sabina Berretta (s.berretta@mclean.harvard.edu)

 

Posted Aug 29, 2019

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunities in Astrophysics, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA, http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/), located at 60 Garden Street opposite the Quadrangle, is one of the world’s great centers for research in astrophysics, with over 300 scientists and access to powerful astronomical observatories worldwide and in space. The Harvard-Smithsonian has at any one time 10s of senior scientists interested in working with undergraduates and have defined their projects here: https://astronomy.fas.harvard.edu/files/astronomy/files/cfa_research_undergrad_2019.pdf

 

 

Harvard has several programs to provide partial support for student research, described at: http://uraf.harvard.edu/ If you have questions about getting involved in research at the CfA, please do not hesitate to contact me. Best wishes, Karin Öberg, Director of Undergraduate Studies, Astrophysics Professor of Astronomy Harvard University koberg@cfa.harvard.edu 617-496-9062 P-346

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Ghebremichael Lab, Ragon Institute of MGH, Harvard, MIT

Contact information: Dr. Musie Ghebremichael, musie_ghebremichael@dfci.harvard.edu, 400 Technology Square, Cambridge, http://www.ragoninstitute.org/portfolio-item/ghebremichael/

Project description and duties: The research focus of the lab focuses on mathematical/statistical modelling of HIV/TB Data.

Skills required: Knowledge of  R or Python is a plus

Learning outcomes: Data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: Negotiable

Mentoring: Student will meet with the PI weekly and will present findings to other lab members

Student stipend: Non paid position. Students are encouraged to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Course credit:  Students can conduct research for course credit

 Application information: Please email a CV or resume and a description of previous experience, research motivation, and career goals to Dr Ghebremichael

 

 

Undergraduate research opportunity in Dr. Ionescu lab in Harvard School of Dental Medicine

PI name: Andreia Ionescu, Department: Developmental Biology, Harvard Medical School

Contact information:

Tel: 617-432-1358,

Email: andreia_ionescu@hms.harvard.edu
Location: 200 Longwood Ave, REB 414, Dev Bio

Lab website: https://hsdm.harvard.edu/ionescu-lab

 

Description of the project and duties

Cartilage traumatic lesions heal poorly due to the low regenerative/repair ability of the resident cells and a shortage of a blood supply that could deliver both potential progenitor cells as well as biomolecules that could help with repair. In children, injuries to the growth plate cartilage result in growth arrest, formation of a “bony bar” and limb length discrepancies. In adults, injuries to the articular cartilage lead to the development of Osteoarthritis (OA), a painful joint disease, characterized by progressive and irreversible deterioration of the articular cartilage. Novel therapeutic strategies are needed to prevent cartilage degeneration and to stimulate the endogenous progenitor cells to help with regeneration and healing.

Dr. Ionescu’s lab seeks to discover new biomarkers to help label, identify and study the endogenous cartilage stem cells for either growth plate or articular cartilage. We have recently discovered a novel marker for growth plate cartilage stem cells. By performing lineage tracing, IHC, cell isolation and RNA-seq, we seek to label, characterize and follow the trajectory of these stem cells during postnatal development and in response to injury. This is a new area of research, which, if successful, it would support the development of bioengineering strategies for physeal cartilage regeneration.

Student duties: The student will perform various experiments such as lineage tracing analysis, fluorescence microscopy, histological assessment of cartilage degeneration/regeneration, immunofluorescence with tyramide amplification for various stem cell markers. The student is expected to come in time, prepare necessary materials for their experiments, generate data, and make well-documented laboratory notebook for record keeping and data analysis. The students will participate in various laboratory meetings and discussions.

Skills required: We prefer students to have basic molecular biology/histology laboratory skills, but it is not required. No prior research experience is necessary. We will provide experimental and theoretical trainings to gain their research skills.

Learning outcome: The student will acquire knowledge and expertise on stem cells and cartilage regeneration via experiments, literature reading, and scientific discussions. The student will have opportunity to present their work during weekly project meetings and lab meetings. Depending on the progress on the project, the student will be considered to become co-author on the publication.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: We expect that the student will  spend ~16 hours per week. However, it is negotiable based on students’ needs. The project will be 1-2 semester length but can be extended with new discoveries and student’s performance and needs.

Mentoring: The student will be primarily mentored by a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Ionescu’s group, who will be responsible for scientific, technical and experimental training of the student. Dr. Ionescu will also work closely with the student and provide scientific guidance and mentoring.

Stipend: The laboratory does not provide funding to pay student’s stipend. We encourage students to register for a research course credit and for their senior thesis. In addition, Dr. Ionescu will work very closely with the student to support their fellowship applications such as the HCRP and other fellowship opportunities (contact Dr. Babakhanyan for more info at ababakhanyan@fas.harvard.edu). In the past, we have had a very high success rate of our undergraduates securing fellowship funding.

If you are interested in, please send your resume to andreia_ionescu@hms.harvard.edu to set up a meeting.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity in lncRNA-directed drug discovery in Melanoma (Novina Lab)

Contact informationleon_wertlamas@dfci.harvard.eduNovinaLAB@dfci.harvard.edu

Hospital: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 

(Note: location = Longwood campus)

Project description and duties:

Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a special class of genes which only make RNAs but do not code for proteins. Although many of them have been implicated in cancer and other diseases, very little is understood about these lncRNAs function. To discover how lncRNAs work, we developed a specialized lncRNA-based assay (called Y3H) which systematically defines disease key lncRNA-protein interactions. We have  also developed a platform to screen for drugs that disrupt these key lncRNA-protein interactions, which we anticipate will become a novel class of RNA-directed drugs. Students will operate both platforms and perform downstream experiments with the identified targets and drugs, to obtain lead drug candidates for oncologic and hematologic diseases.

Skills required: none required, but some lab experience is preferred

Learning outcomes:

Students working on this project will learn basic RNA and protein biochemistry and molecular biology techniques (e.g. cloning, cell culturing, transfection, flow cytometry) and state-of-the-art experimental techniques, (e.g. robotics, next-generation sequencing, and high-throughput drug discovery platforms). An important aspect of training in the Novina lab is learning to conduct translational research using clinical samples, advanced technologies, computational methods, and humanized model systems. This internship will provide a multi-discipline training environment that leverages basic, clinical, and industry collaborations which will provide diverse career opportunities.

Number of hours students are expected to work: minimum of 10 hours per week

Length of the project: minimum of 6 months (the longer the more you will get out of it)

Mentoring: Dr. Novina, Dr. Wert-Lamas, and other senior postdocs in the lab actively mentor students through weekly meetings, lab group meetings, and one-on-one interactions. You will be welcome to join our lab meetings.

Student stipend: This is a volunteer position or for credit position. We would also be happy to help you apply for relevant fellowships (contact Dr. Babakhanyan at ababakhanyan@fas.harvard.edu for more info on fellowships).

How to apply: send a copy of your CV by email to  : leon_wertlamas@dfci.harvard.eduNovinaLAB@dfci.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, McLean Geriatric Psychiatry Research Program, McLean Hospital

Contact information: Dr. Forester and Rose May, rmay@mclean.harvard.edu, Mclean Hospital

Project description and duties:

The Geriatric Psychiatry Research Program, directed by Dr. Brent P. Forester, addresses cutting edge research questions in the areas of dementia and mood disorders using new neuroimaging techniques, clinicopathological correlations, and other study methods. Current studies include a number of Sponsor-led Alzheimer's Disease clinical drug trials, longitudinal analyses of older adults with depression and bipolar disorder, and neuroimaging studies focused on cerebral blood volume and brain network mapping in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

This internship is geared towards students interested in gaining both clinical and research experience. Our interns are expected to be able to interact directly with patients in our studies. For example, our interns get the opportunity to provide companionship to patients while they receive their IP infusions, gaining invaluable clinical experience while simultaneously learning firsthand about the different stages of Alzheimer’s disease. They also are expected to enter data from study visits into our database and assist in the data analysis process for several of our studies (see other responsibilities listed below).

Our program views this internship as a learning experience for our student visitors. As such, in addition to intern responsibilities, students will also have the opportunity to observe study visits, learn how to administer neuropsychological batteries, speak with PIs about future career directions, attend grand rounds at the hospital, and learn about the research process.

Skills required:

  • Strong desire and willingness to learn
  • Interest in research, medicine, psychiatry, clinical psychology, neuroscience, biology, or psychology
  • Ability to come onto site for at least 10 hours a week (schedule is flexible!)
  • Comfortable interacting directly with study participants (clinical experience is preferred but not required)
  • Previous research experience
  • Proficient computer skills
  • Ability to learn new database and stats programs if needed

Learning outcomes:

  • Learn how to administer neuropsychological batteries
  • Media design and upkeep
  • Shadow study visits and learn about the research process
  • Attend didactic learning sessions

Number of hours: 10 hours/week

Mentoring: Mentorship opportunities are available

Student stipend: N/A

Course credit: Case-by-case basis

Application information: Please contact Rose May at rmay@mclean.harvard.edu or (617) 855-3192 if you are interested in applying!

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Professor Fishman Lab, Harvard Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology Department

Contact information: Dr. Mark C. Fishman, Harvard Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, 7 Divinity Avenue, Sherman Fairchild Building, Lab Website

Project description and duties: Zebrafish studies on genetics of social behavior

Skills required: No prior experience required

Learning outcomes: laboratory skills, research skills such as study design, data analysis methods, presentations, and scientific writing.

Experimental design, methodologies for genetic and behavioral analysis

Number of hours Can be discussed

Mentoring: Mentoring by Professor Fishman and post-docs in the lab

Student stipend: None

Course credit: Yes

Application information:  Brief paragraph on interest, major, and courses taken to date. Email to Emily Andrews (emily_andrews@fas.harvard.edu)

 

 

Undergraduate research opportunity at the Histology Lab, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital

PI: Jean Augustinack, Ph.D.

Department of Radiology, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging

149 13th St. Suite 2301

Charlestown, MA 02129

jean@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu

The student will contribute to a histology project that aims to map neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease in human brain in a preclinical phase, using a whole pipeline of tissue processing and a variety of different histological stains. The histologic stains will be correlated with high resolution ex vivo MRI to improve neurodegenerative disease diagnosis in in vivo neuroimaging. Additional projects may include manually labeling brain structures in in vivo MRI to produce and improve anatomical boundaries in brain parcellation software. Depending on the student researcher's interest, skill, and work habits, the work can also focus on new avenues of preclinical research in Alzheimer’s disease.

Prior experience working in a laboratory is desired but not required.

The student will gain experience in neuroanatomy, histology and general tissue processing of the human brain. Depending on progress and interest, the student may also assist with preparing conference abstracts and publications.

Project duration and hours per week are negotiable.

Dr. Augustinack will mentor the undergraduate student. There will be opportunity to participate in weekly group meetings, give presentations, and receive one-on-one mentoring as needed.

Students are encouraged to apply to the Harvard College Research Program and other fellowships or register for research course credit.

Please email a resume and a short (one paragraph) description of your research interests and career goals to Dr. Augustinack (jean@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu).

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Shivdasani Lab, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Contact information:     Ramesh A. Shivdasani, MD, PhD Professor of Medicine ramesh_shivdasani@dfci.harvard.edu
44 Binney Street, Dana 720  
Boston, MA 02215  Ph. (617) 632-5746  www.shivdasanilab.dana-farber.org

Project description and duties: The laboratory studies how transcription factors and chromatin states act to generate and maintain unique cell identities. The dominant model is the mouse gastrointestinal tract, where the group investigates molecular mechanisms of embryonic development and the gene regulatory basis of adult stem cell functions. Recent publications (some with undergraduate authors) include

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24413398

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27111282

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27212235

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27524622

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28648363

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29321178

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30366903

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30905509

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31263286

A well-defined project will be crafted based on students’ particular interests, skills, and time commitment. 

Skills required: Working familiarity with research laboratory environments (through prior exposure such as a high school or college summer internship) and at least two of the following college courses completed: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Genetics, Developmental Biology.

Learning outcomes: Mastery of technical skills in routine molecular biology, cell biology, animal handling, and microscopy. Students will also develop core research skills in framing a project, designing controlled experiments, analyzing and interpreting data, presenting research findings, and scientific writing (e.g., honors thesis, publication in scientific journals, descriptions for a lay audience).

Number of hours: Negotiable. A useful guideline is >10 hrs/week.

Mentoring: Direct mentoring will be provided by a senior postdoctoral fellow, with Dr. Shivdasani’s active involvement. Student can attend (and make oral presentations in) group meetings.

Student stipend: Students are encouraged (and supported) to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Course credit: Juniors and seniors may earn academic credit and are especially encouraged to consider basing an honors thesis on research conducted in the laboratory.

Application information: Please email Dr. Shivdasani at ramesh_shivdasani@dfci.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. Lois Choi-Kain’s Lab, McLean Hospital

Contact information: The Principal Investigator is Dr. Lois W. Choi-Kain, Gunderson Personality Disorders Institute, McLean Hospital / Harvard Medical School.

Please contact Gabs Ilagan at gilagan@partners.org with any questions.

Project description and duties:

We are looking for an undergraduate research assistant to support research on developing accessible and affordable pathways to care for individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD), a prevalent psychiatric disorder characterized by interpersonal sensitivity, affective instability, and impulsivity. Our group is located on McLean Hospital’s main campus (115 Mill St, Belmont, MA 02478), with many clinical activities centered around our Cambridge location (625 Mt Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138). Our group, formerly headed by the late Dr. John Gunderson, holds a vested interest in the dissemination of good psychiatric management (GPM), a “generalist”, easily learned intervention to treat BPD against a backdrop of expensive and often inaccessible care models. We are also interested in comorbidities of BPD, including PTSD, and are collaborating with partners in Germany and at McLean Hospital to conduct a trial of dialectical behavior therapy for PTSD with a focus on psychophysiological responses to exposure treatment. Particularly high-yield days for a student to come in would be on Tuesdays at McLean Hospital and Fridays at our Cambridge location, although there is flexibility with this schedule.

 

We are looking for a highly motivated student with a demonstrated interest in psychiatric disorders to assist with data analysis and literature-review-based research (e.g., systematic reviews/meta-analyses). Ongoing projects include a study of the interplay of social cognitive, neuropsychological, and attachment factors in BPD, a review of “generalist” treatments for BPD, brief treatment options for BPD, and a systematic review and meta-analysis of smartphone-based interventions for BPD and related symptomatology. In addition, we will require assistance with office administrative duties related to the responsible conduct of research.

Skills required: Demonstrated interest in clinical work (e.g., medicine, clinical psychology, clinical social work) is strongly recommended as the position provides ample opportunities for shadowing diagnostic interviews, clinical rounds, case discussions, and supervision meetings featuring footage of individual sessions. Previous experience in literature review and statistical techniques relating to biomedical and psychological research is desired, but not required.

Learning outcomes: research skills (e.g. data presentation, scientific writing)

Number of hours: 10 hours/week for Fall 2019

Mentoring: Dr. Lois Choi-Kain will be mentoring the undergraduate. Mentorship meetings would be weekly depending on the day the student is working. Students can attend group meetings.

Student stipend: Unpaid

Course credit: Possible

Application information: Send a resume and cover letter with detail on past experiences and how this position would help you achieve your future professional goals to Gabs at gilagan@partners.org.

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Dr. White Lab, MGH East – CNY

Contact information: Kristin White – Cutaneous Biology Research Center, MGH

Massachusetts General Hospital
Cutaneous Biology Research Center
Building 149, 13th Street
Charlestown, MA 02129
Tel: (617) 726-4440
Fax: (617) 724-4453
Email:
kristin.white@cbrc2.mgh.harvard.edu

http://dms.hms.harvard.edu/BBS/fac/WhiteKristin.php

Project description and duties: Our lab is interested in taking on an undergraduate research student to investigate the regulation and physiological impact of a novel form of stem cell quiescence that occurs in the Drosophila nervous system. We recently published a paper describing the entry of neural stem cells into a quiescent state during the G2 phase of the cell cycle, in contrast to a canonical G0 quiescence that occurs in G1 phase (Harding & White, Dev Biol 2019). An undergraduate researcher taking on this project would perform genetic crosses, nervous system tissue dissections and immunostaining of fixed Drosophila embryos, as well as confocal microscopy and image analysis. The student would also be responsible for common lab duties including passage of fly stocks and capping fly food vials, as well as presentation of their ongoing work at group meetings. A student joining our lab would gain experience with Drosophila as a model organism and learn about the embryonic development of Drosophila. The fly is an ideal model system for short to medium-term student research projects due to its rapid development and the wide availability of genetic and molecular tools.

Skills required: No previous experience is required. However, some coursework related to basic genetic and molecular biology principles (including gene regulation and cell cycle dynamics) would be beneficial.

Learning outcomes: An undergraduate researcher would be expected to gradually take on independent responsibility for experimental design over the course of the project, providing them with valuable skills in time management and experimental planning. Laboratory skills would include tissue fixation and preparation for immunostaining, genetics, confocal microscopy and quantitative image analysis. The student would also be expected to present their findings as updates at group meetings, as well as in one-on-one meetings with the PI. Depending on the research progress and outcomes, the student would be encouraged to materially contribute to a scientific publication by writing up their results and interpretations.

Number of hours Minimum 10-12 hours per week, length of the project is open pending research findings. This time commitment may be different for students interested in applying their research to course credit.

Mentoring: The undergraduate student would be directly mentored by a 5th year Harvard BBS graduate student. Mentoring meetings with the graduate student would occur weekly or as needed, research update meetings with the PI would occur on a weekly basis. The student would be expected to attend weekly group meetings, within scheduling constraints.

Student stipend: This position is unpaid – the research group will not be providing a stipend. Students may choose to work in the lab as a volunteer or for course credit. Interested students are encouraged to apply for Harvard undergraduate research fellowships – both the mentor and PI are available to aid students in putting together an application for the September deadline. https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Course credit: This lab is Harvard affiliated, so research conducted here may qualify for course credit pending approval by the student’s concentration advisor.

Application information: Interested students are encouraged to send their resume to Dr. Kristin White (kristin.white@cbrc2.mgh.harvard.edu). Applicants will be interviewed by the mentor and PI to discuss potential project lengths and scheduling before joining the lab.

 

 

Posted Aug 23, 2019

Research Assistant/Student Programmer, The Speech and Feeding Disorder Lab (Dr. Jordan Green), MGH Institute of Health Professions

PI: Dr. Jordan Green

79/96 13th Street, Boston MA 02129

https://www.mghihp.edu/research/speech-and-feeding-disorders-lab

Questions? Please contact the SFDL Lab Manager, Brian Richburg at brichburg@mghihp.edu

Description of the project and duties (link to published manuscripts describing the work)

The Speech and Feeding Disorders Lab is looking for someone experienced in Matlab programming to help us maintain and expand a series of scientific scripts in use by the lab. These scripts involve basic signal processing and the calculation of statistics time-series data, including acoustic (audio) and kinematic (movement) signals.

The SFDL is dedicated to advancing knowledge and clinical practice through basic and applied research on speech & swallowing disorders. Some of our current projects include tracking facial motor function after facial transplant, studying bulbar symptoms in people with ALS, and using new camera technology to develop assistive communication devices for people with speech impairments.

You can access a list of recent publications here.

Skills required: No prior research experience is required. Students should have experience programming in Matlab including signal processing, 3D biomechanical analysis, and graphic user interface design.

Learning outcome: Students will have the opportunity to apply their programming knowledge to real-world research data related to speech disorders arising from neurologic impairment. Students will gain familiarity with a variety of research methods and data analysis routines for studying facial biomechanics, which may include processing data from: Motion capture, electromagnetic articulography, acoustic analysis and EMG data.

Mentoring: who will be mentoring student, how often are mentorship meetings, etc.:

Students would be expected to work approximately 10 hours per week.

After the initial training, students will have weekly meetings with the lab manager. Depending on the project selected, the student may be assigned to work with a Doctoral student or Postdoc on a research project.

Compensation: Yes, research assistants will be paid an hourly rate of $15.

To apply: please email your resume to Brian Richburg at brichburg@mghihp.edu

 

 

 

 

Undergraduate research opportunity at the Laboratory for Computational Neuroimaging, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH

PI: Anastasia Yendiki, Ph.D.

Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging

149 13th St. Suite 2301

Charlestown, MA 02129

ayendiki@mgh.harvard.edu

http://scholar.harvard.edu/a-y

The student researcher will contribute to a project that aims to map connections in the human brain, based on a combination of in vivo diffusion MRI brain scans with prior information from microscopic resolution ex vivo MRI and optical imaging. Brain pathways will be labeled manually to produce training data for an automated image analysis algorithm. Algorithms developed by our team learn the anatomical neighborhood of the pathways from such training data and then reconstruct the same pathways automatically in novel data sets. Depending on the student researcher's interests and skills, the work can focus more on neuroanatomical exploration of the in vivo and ex vivo data, software development, or both.

Prior experience working in a Unix-based computer environment is desired but not required.

The student will gain experience in neuroanatomy and in the analysis of neuroimaging data. Depending on progress and interest, the student may also assist with preparing conference abstracts and publications.

Project duration and hours per week are negotiable.

The student will be mentored by Dr. Yendiki and a postdoctoral research fellow. There will be opportunities to participate in weekly group meetings, give presentations, and receive one-on-one mentoring as needed.

One of our past interns has described her experience here:

https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/blog/undergraduate-researcher-profile-nivedita-ravi-neuroimaging-project

Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for research course credit.

Please email a resume and a short (one paragraph) description of your research interests and career goals to Dr. Yendiki (ayendiki@mgh.harvard.edu). 

 

Posted Aug 8, 2019

Undergraduate research volunteer in Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders Lab

 

Elizabeth Olson, Ph.D.

Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders Laboratory (ADLab)

Center for Depression, Anxiety and Stress Research (CDASR)

McLean Hospital / Harvard Medical School

115 Mill St., Belmont, MA

https://cdasr.mclean.harvard.edu/atsd/

 

Description of project and duties: Our lab has multiple current neuroimaging and behavioral projects investigating decision-making and reward processing in trauma-exposed populations.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30449518

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30409390

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28294462

 

I am hoping to find an undergraduate student volunteer who is interested in helping with various components of these projects, including helping with recruiting and phone screening research participants, data collection and analysis, literature reviews, and manuscript preparation. Prior research experience is not necessary, but personal maturity, sensitivity, attention to detail, time management, and communication skills are essential.

 

Minimum time commitment is four hours per week for one semester; students who can commit more time are preferred.

Mentoring: Participants will meet with Dr. Olson for at least one hour per week.

This is a student visitor (volunteer) position. Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

 

To apply, email your CV to Dr. Olson: eaolson@mclean.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate opportunity, Deep learning in MGH Cardiovascular Imaging, Dr. Lu

We are looking for an outstanding undergraduate students for medical imaging-based deep learning research at the Cardiovascular Imaging Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

Current projects apply deep learning to predict health outcomes (e.g. heart attack) from medical imaging (e.g. CT and x-ray). We work with high quality trial datasets of tens of thousands of patients with imaging and adjudicated outcomes (ROMICAT II Hoffmann U et al. NEJM 2012; PROMISE Douglas PS et al. NEJM 2015; Framingham Heart Study Hoffmann U et al. JAMA Cardiology 2017; REPRIEVE Hoffmann U, Lu MT et al Am Heart J 2019; NLST Berg CD et al NEJM 2011). See our recent publication using AI to predict mortality from chest x-rays in JAMA Open: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2738349.

Prerequisites:

  • Enthusiasm for applying deep learning to improve health
  • Coding experience (CS50 equivalent or higher)
  • Experience with or commitment to learn PyTorch (preferred) and/or Tensorflow
  • Able to work in a collaborative team environment
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills

We are located near the Charles/MGH Red Line station at

165 Cambridge St, Suite 400

Boston, MA 02114

https://goo.gl/maps/FKbGFWrb8wUi1pp6A

Students will be mentored by Michael Lu, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Radiology and Director of Research, MGH Cardiovascular Imaging. Research course credit, stipend, and length of project are negotiable. Please send CVs to Dr. Lu at mlu@mgh.harvard.edu

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Institute, McLean Hospital

Contact information: Jacob Nota, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, jnota@mclean.harvard.edu, McLean Hospital, https://www.mcleanhospital.org/programs/ocd-institute

Project description and duties: Research examining the relations between biological circadian rhythms, sleep, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25603315). This new line of research represents a novel pathway to understanding and treating one of the most disabling mental health disorders. The study involves collection of melatonin samples in order to measure biological circadian rhythms in individuals participating in intensive residential treatment for OCD. The research assistant will spend between 8 and 16 hours a week facilitating data collection, documentation, and assisting with subsequent data cleaning/analysis. Because of the necessities of the study, there is a need for availability during evening and night hours (e.g., between 1800 and 0400).

Skills required: Prior research experience is desirable but not required. Attention to detail and intrinsic motivation to be involved in research is required.

Learning outcomes: This position would be an excellent fit for applicants interested in obtaining doctoral training in clinical or counseling psychology or psychiatry, and/or preparation for research assistant positions after graduation. Mentorship is an important part of our mission, and our previous students have been accepted into top graduate schools and earned authorship on presentations and papers.

This project is expected to be ongoing for one year. A minimum 8 hours per week commitment is needed (with these hours being able n the evening and night). For interested parties, up to 16 hours a week may be available.

Mentoring: the research assistant will participate in weekly research meetings. The student will also meet with the principal investigator in one-on-one format every week.

Student stipend: Currently the position is not eligible for a stipend and is on a volunteer basis. Interested students are encouraged  to apply for Harvard fellowships: https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities or research course credit

Application information: please send CV/resume  to:

Jacob Nota, Ph.D. at jnota@mclean.harvard.edu

We will begin reviewing applicants for Fall semester immediately.

 

 

Posted July 17, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity in cell- and ionic liquid-based drug delivery, Mitragotri Lab at Northwestern Building, SEAS

PI: Prof. Samir Mitragotri

Department: John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Lab location: B154, Northwest Building, 52 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA 02138, https://drugdelivery.seas.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: The Mitragotri lab focuses on the development of advanced drug delivery systems. Cell-based therapies have been increasingly recognized as promising interventions for many diseases. One aspect of my research is to leverage cells for targeted or localized drug delivery. Particularly, we are interested in manipulating the interactions between the carrier cells and nanoparticles for tunable drug delivery.  A second aspect of my research focuses on using ionic liquids for topical/transdermal drug delivery. Particularly, we are interested in elucidating how formulation parameters influence the delivery performance of ionic liquids. The student will be involved in nanoparticle synthesis and characterization, cell culture, ionic liquid synthesis, and formulation development. He or she will also be trained on experimental design of drug formulations and in vitro and in vivo characterization during this process.  

Skills required: Passion and dedication to research in biomedical area. No prior research experience is necessary.

Learning outcomes:

  • Nanoparticle fabrication and characterization.
  • Cell culture.
  • Ionic liquid synthesis and characterization.
  • Formulation development and characterization.
  • Characterization techniques: DLS, NMR, FTIR, HPLC, spectrophotometer, microscopy;
  • Experimental design, data processing and analysis, presentations etc.

Number of hours: Hours will be flexible, but we are looking for students who can start asap and hopefully continue for at least 6 months.

Mentoring: Dr. Zongmin Zhao, a postdoctoral researcher will mentor the students. His research experience can be found by https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=Yr9TK8QAAAAJ&hl=en

Student stipend: No stipend is provided. Students are encouraged to apply for fellowships.

Contact information: Interested undergraduate students can send a CV and contact information to Dr. Zongmin Zhao (zmzhao@g.harvard.edu).

 

 

Posted June 17, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity in hydrogel-based drug delivery, Mitragotri Lab at Northwestern Building

PI: Prof. Samir Mitragotri

Department: John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Lab location: B154, Northwest Building, 52 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA 02138, https://drugdelivery.seas.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: Our lab focuses on the development of advanced drug delivery systems. Using drug-loaded hydrogels as depots to realize the long-term, slow release is desirable for treatment of multiple diseases.  The student will be involved in the development of development of nano sized drug crystals, along with the hydrogel synthesis. Small molecular synthesis, polymer modification and relevant characterization will also be involved. He or she will also be trained on experimental design of drug formulation and in vitro and in vivo release during this process.   

Skills required: Passion and dedication to research in biomedical area. No prior research experience is necessary.

Learning outcomes:

  • Biomacromolecule modification, small molecular synthesis and hydrogel-material preparation;
  • Drug and small molecule crystallization;
  • Drug release study (in vitro and in vivo); 
  • Characterization techniques: NMR, FTIR, HPLC, GPC, spectrophotometer, microscopy;
  • Experimental design, data processing and analysis, presentations etc.

Number of hours: Hours will be flexible, but we are looking for students who can start asap and hopefully continue for at least 3 months. Students who can commit for Summer 2019 are highly preferred.

Mentoring: Dr. Yongsheng Gao, a postdoctoral researcher will mentor the students. His research experience can be found by https://is.gd/f9hs4S

Student stipend: No stipend is provided. Students are encouraged to apply for fellowships.

Contact information: Interested undergraduate students can send a CV and contact information to Dr. Yongsheng Gao (yongshenggao@seas.harvard.edu).

 

 

 

Posted April 23, 2019

Research Opportunity to study the neuronal mechanisms underlying reproduction and metabolism, Dr. Victor Navarro’s lab, BWH

Contact informationVictor M Navarro. Medicine (Endocrinology), BWH 221 Longwood Ave, Boston
Tel: +1 617 525 6566 Fax: +1 617 582 6193
Email: vnavarro@bwh.harvard.edu Lab website: http://navarrolab.bwh.harvard.edu

Project description and dutiesOur lab focuses on the characterization of the central factors that regulate reproduction and metabolism including, but not limited to, Kiss1 neurons using a variety of genetic mouse models and viral delivery approaches. The student will be involved in the study of the neuronal mechanisms that regulate the reproductive and metabolic axis, along with the neuronal circuitry that links different brain areas involved in both reproduction and feeding behavior. He or she will be involved in the development and maintenance of mouse colonies, performance of anatomical studies, and determination of different gene and protein expressions in the brain (PCR, in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, etc.). The characterization of a number of biological parameters that define reproductive and metabolic functions will be required (e.g. fertility assessments, daily monitoring of puberty onset, body weight, behavior, food intake etc.). The student will be expected to work in collaboration with other members of the lab but in an independent manner. He/she will be encouraged to present their data at local and regional meetings, analyze their data and prepare them for publication.

Skills requiredPassion, dedication, commitment and ability to work with live mice. No prior research experience is required. Some coursework in neuroscience or biology would be helpful. Experience with MATLAB is a plus but not mandatory.

Learning outcomesThe student that joins our lab is expected to acquire knowledge of neuroanatomy and physiology of the neuronal networks that govern the endocrine system. He or she will gain experience in the handling of mice and maintenance of animal colonies as well as in the planning and performing of experimental protocols, analysis and interpretation of results and presentation of the data in lab meetings and conferences.

Number of hours students are expected to workNegotiable
MentoringThe student will be mentored by myself and senior postdocs in the lab. Weekly meetings will be held.
Does laboratory provide any funds to pay student’s stipendNo stipend is provided so the student is encouraged to apply for fellowships.
Email your resume to vnavarro@bwh.harvard.edu

 

 

Posted April 15, 2019

Research Assistant, Dr. Pepperberg’s Lab, Harvard University

PI name: Irene Pepperberg
Department: Psychology
Contact information:
Pepperberglabmanager@gmail.com
Location: Harvard University’s William James Hall, 33 Kirkland St., Cambridge
Lab website:
https://alexfoundation.org/

Duties: We are currently investigating concepts of exclusion, delayed gratification, mirror recognition, vocal development, and probabilistic reasoning. Research assistants are responsible for assisting in daily care and the training and testing of African Grey parrots on cognitive and communicative tasks.

Care includes but is not limited to the following: cleaning, feeding, and watering of animals as assigned; and observation of animals for abnormalities and sickness. Training in handling, care, and protocols will be provided. Prior experience in a research lab is not necessary.
Publications can be viewed at the following link:
https://alexfoundation.org/links-2/

Position requires a minimum commitment of 6 hours per week for at least one full semester.
The lab is staffed from 9am to 8pm, seven days per week, including holidays.

The PI, Dr. Pepperberg, is in the lab at least three hours per day, and when she is not present, senior students and/or the lab manager are present to provide direction

Volunteers, work/study, research credit or HCRP funding preferred, but students can earn up to a total of $599/yr (Jan 1-Dec 31) from The Alex Foundation.

To apply, please email lab manager Roni Hyman at pepperberglabmanager@gmail.com to request an application.

Publications:

Clements, K. A., Gray, S. L., Gross, B., & Pepperberg, I. M. (2018, March 12). Initial Evidence for

Probabilistic Reasoning in a Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus). Journal of Comparative Psychology.

Advance online publication. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/com0000106

Pepperberg, I.M., Gray, S.L., Mody, S., Cornero, F.M., & Carey, S. (2018). Logical reasoning by a Grey parrot? A case study of the disjunctive syllogism. Behaviour, 1-37. https://doi.org/10.1163/1568539X-00003528

 

Posted April 2, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity at the Laboratory for Computational Neuroimaging, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, MGH

PI: Anastasia Yendiki, Ph.D.

Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging

149 13th St. Suite 2301

Charlestown, MA 02129

ayendiki@mgh.harvard.edu

http://scholar.harvard.edu/a-y

The student researcher will contribute to a project that aims to map connections in the human brain, based on a combination of in vivo diffusion MRI brain scans with prior information from microscopic resolution ex vivo MRI and optical imaging. Brain pathways will be labeled manually to produce training data for an automated image analysis algorithm. Algorithms developed by our team learn the anatomical neighborhood of the pathways from such training data and then reconstruct the same pathways automatically in novel data sets. Depending on the student researcher's interests and skills, the work can focus more on neuroanatomical exploration of the in vivo and ex vivo data, software development, or both.

Prior experience working in a Unix-based computer environment is desired but not required.

The student will gain experience in neuroanatomy and in the analysis of neuroimaging data. Depending on progress and interest, the student may also assist with preparing conference abstracts and publications.

Project duration and hours per week are negotiable.

The student will be mentored by Dr. Yendiki and a postdoctoral research fellow. There will be opportunities to participate in weekly group meetings, as well as receive one-on-one mentoring as needed.

One of our past interns has described her experience here:

https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/blog/undergraduate-researcher-profile-nivedita-ravi-neuroimaging-project

Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

Please email a resume and a short (one paragraph) description of your research interests and career goals to Dr. Yendiki (ayendiki@mgh.harvard.edu).

 

 

 

Posted March 27, 2019

 

Undergraduate summer research internship, Cognitive Neuroscience Group, MGH Institute of Health Professions

Contact information: Dr. Yael Arbel, co-director Cognitive Neuroscience Group, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH IHP, 79 13th Street, Boston, MA 02129. IHPCNG@MGHIHP.EDU; https://www.mghihp.edu/research/cognitive-neuroscience-group

Project description and duties: The Cognitive Neuroscience Group is a collaborative research group that uses behavioral and neuroscience methods to examine the relationship between learning, language ability, and cognitive factors. We use electrophysiological and eye tracking data to study typical and atypical learning across the lifespan and in different disorders (e.g., Developmental Language Disorder, Aphasia, Traumatic Brain Injury). The research assistant will have the opportunity to contribute to several research projects, including two federally funded projects focusing on the neural function associated with learning in typically developing children and children with developmental language disorders.

Duties: The research assistant will be involved in all aspects of data collection and analysis: literature review, task design, recruitment events, interaction with research participants, scoring and analysis of behavioral data as well as EEG signal processing. EEG signal processing will include the use of Matlab based tool boxes for artifact detection/correction, latency jitter correction, and Principal Component Analysis (PCA).

Skills required: excellent communication skills (verbal and written), ability to work independently and in a team. Preferred skills include: coding in Matlab, signal processing, eye-tracking data analysis, statistical analysis using SPSS or R, creating scripts in Excel and other programing. No research experience is required.

Learning outcome: The RA will receive training in behavioral and EEG data collection and data analysis. Training in eye-tracking data acquisition and analysis is also possible. The RA will participate in weekly lab meetings that will include presentations by PIs, and students at all levels (PhD, graduate, undergraduate). The RA will gain understanding of research design related to the study of learning in individuals with typical and atypical cognitive profiles. The RA will have the opportunity to present at the biweekly CNG meetings and to participate in scientific writing

The RA is expected to work 15-20 hours per week (preferably 3-4 days a week; weekends may be included) for 10 weeks, starting June 3rd, 2019. Our lab is located at the MGH Institute of Health Professions in the Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston. The RA is expected to spend at least 15 hours a week on site.

Mentoring: The RA will be mentored by the Drs. Arbel, Zipse, and Vallila Rohter, and will interact with CNG members in training, meetings, and data collection sessions. The RA will attend weekly lab meetings, and weekly mentorship meetings with the PI.

Student stipend: Funds are available to support 1-2 interns. However, additional RA positions are available for students who receive funds through the HCRP or other fellowships. https://lifesciences.fas.harvard.edu/research-opportunities

Yael Arbel, CCC-SLP, Ph.D. Associate Professor
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
yarbel@mghihp.edu  (617) 643-4821

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
MGH Institute of Health Professions
Charlestown Navy Yard
36 1st Avenue, Boston MA 02129

 

 

Posted March 8, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Division of Genetics

PI name: Natasha Frank, M.D.

Department: Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Division of Genetics

Contact information: Fiona Harrington
Operations Coordinator
Division of Genetics
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
0168A New Research Building
77 Avenue Louis Pasteur
Boston, MA 02115
Phone: 617-525-7584  Email: FAHARRINGTON@BWH.HARVARD.EDU

 

Location: Brigham and Women’s Hospital
0168F New Research Building
77 Avenue Louis Pasteur
Boston, MA 02115  Phone: 617-525-8111  Email: NYFRANK@BWH.HARVARD.EDU
Lab website: http://franklab.bwh.harvard.edu

Description of the project and duties:

The Frank Lab in the Division of Genetics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School invites applications for a graduate/undergraduate research assistant. The successful applicant will use standard molecular biology techniques (PCR, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, tissue culture, cloning, etc.) to further projects involving stem cell therapy for eye disease, stem cells for regenerative wound healing, and targeting of therapy-resistant cancer stem cells. In addition, they will have the opportunity to engage in research involving 3D printing and to learn bioinformatics techniques for data analysis and visualization.

Interested candidates are encouraged to view our publications in this area:

1. Frank NY, et al. Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2003 Nov 21; 278 (47): 47156 – 65. Regulation of progenitor cell fusion by ABCB5P-glycoprotein, a novel human ATP-binding cassette transporter.

2. Ksander BR, et al. Nature. 2014 Jul 17; 511 (7509) : 353-7. ABCB5 is a limbal stem cell gene required for corneal development and repair.

3. Schatton T, et al. Cell Reports. 2015 Sep 8;12 (10) : 1564-74. Abcb5 identifies immunoregulatory dermal cells.

Skills required: Consideration will be given to highly motivated students pursuing a degree in the biomedical sciences or related field. Prior lab experience is preferred but not required.

Learning outcome: The trainees will acquire basic laboratory skills such as PCR, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, tissue culture, cloning, etc., research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentations, scientific writing, etc.

Number of hours students are expected to work, length of the project: it is negotiable

Mentoring: The trainee will be mentored by the PI and postdoctoral fellow Catherine Lee, Ph.D.

Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

Please send a cover letter detailing interest and a current CV/resume to Dr. Natasha Frank (NYFRANK@BWH.HARVARD.EDU).

 

 

 

Undergraduate Research Position, Pediatrics and Neuroscience, Lurie Center for Autism, MGH for Children

Evan Bordt, PhD; Postdoctoral Fellow in the lab of Dr. Staci Bilbo, PhD; Pediatrics and Neuroscience, Lurie Center for Autism, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children

Contact: ebordt@mgh.harvard.edu, http://bilbolab-harvard.org

Project: The Bilbo Lab focuses on the study of neuroimmune interactions in brain development, using pre-clinical models. We collaborate with clinical research groups to translate our findings to human populations. We are particularly interested in the role of immune molecules in both normal and disrupted brain development, based on evidence from human and animal studies that immune system dysfunction or inflammation may be critical in neurodevelopmental disorders, including schizophrenia, cognitive and mood disorders, and autism. A particular focus is on the resident immune cells of the brain, microglia, including their development and function in response to early life inflammatory signals. Our lab is interested in the field of immunometabolism, with a particular focus on the role of mitochondrial alterations (i.e. bioenergetics) in microglial functions.

We are recruiting undergraduate scholars to get involved with several aspects of our projects aimed at determining the role of neural-glial and neural-immune interactions in brain and behavioral outcomes, including cellular and molecular analyses of microglial function, behavioral analyses in rodent models, and the processing and analysis of data for collaborative clinical (human) studies at the Lurie Center for Autism. There will also be many opportunities for interacting with and shadowing clinicians at the Lurie Center, one of the largest clinical care centers for Autism and related disorders in the world.

Skills Required: Wet lab skills in molecular biology (e.g. qPCR, ELISA, Westerns) are preferred but not required. An understanding, respect, and acceptance of the use of live animals in research is absolutely required.

Learning outcomes: Students will learn skills in rodent handling and behavior, and in cellular, molecular, cell culture, and microscopy techniques, and will have the opportunity to present at lab meetings and/or conferences, and to gain authorship on manuscripts as warranted.

Hours: Flexible hours, term-time and summer opportunities available, part-time or full-time volunteering. The lab is in the Charlestown Navy yard campus, building 114. A free shuttle from MGH main campus runs every 15 min.

Mentoring: The Bilbo lab consists of many postdoctoral fellows, students, technicians, and undergraduate researchers. We are very much a team, and mentoring and teamwork are key components of our lab culture. The student will be closely mentored by Dr. Bordt, in addition to the overall team approach, and will also meet with Dr. Bilbo. There are weekly lab meetings on Thursdays at 3:00, for which the student is encouraged to attend (but not required).

Funding: This is an unpaid research opportunity. Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP for funding (email Dr. Babakhanyan at ababakhanyan@fas.harvard.edu for more info), and we are happy to help with the preparation of applications.

To apply: Please send CV and cover letter briefly explaining why you would like to get involved in research to ebordt@mgh.harvard.edu.

 

 

 

Posted Feb 21, 2019

Haplotype-aware de novo assembly of related individuals, G. Church Lab

 

George Church Lab (http://arep.med.harvard.edu/gmc/)

Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and Harvard Medical School, affiliated with Harvard-MIT HST, Broad Institute, MIT Media Lab

Scientific question​. Humans are diploid, and hence there exist two versions of each chromosome, one inherited from the mother and the other from the father. Determining the DNA sequences of these two chromosomal copies---called haplotypes---is important for many applications ranging from population history to clinical questions. Existing sequencing technologies cannot read a chromosome from start to end, but instead deliver small pieces of sequence (called reads). Like in a jigsaw puzzle, the underlying genome sequences are

reconstructed from the reads by finding the overlaps between them. However, current standard approaches cannot produce the sequences of both haplotypes but “collapse” them to obtain one consensus sequence. We develop algorithms to solve the genome assembly for diploids, that is, “to simultaneously solve two jigsaw puzzles with very similar yet different images”. Furthermore, we want to incorporate the pedigree information in the underlying model to generate diploid assemblies for related individuals. At the application side, the main

question is how much read data is required for related individuals as opposed to single individual.

Approach​. Due to the sequencing errors in the reads, heterozygous and repetitive genomic regions, the assembly problem is challenging. Over the past few decades, researchers solved it by casting it as an overlap graph problem, where nodes are the reads and edges represent the overlap between reads. To detect regions where the two haplotypes differ (called heterozygosity), we look for simple local structures called bubbles. A bubble is a type of directed acyclic subgraph with single distinct source and sink vertices that consists of

multiple edges (with the same direction) between these pair of vertices. Once bubbles have been identified, they are simplified by removing structures most likely resulting from sequencing errors. The resulting bubbles can then be used to solve the “phasing problem”: find two paths that correspond to the sought haplotypes for every individual in a pedigree.

Tasks.

1. Investigate local structures (bubbles) in assembly graphs.

2. Formalize the problem of removing erroneous structures due to sequencing errors.

3. An efficient algorithm to detect bubbles that represent regions of heterozygosity.

4. Develop an efficient approach for phasing bubble chains in a joint framework for

Pedigrees

Relevant papers.

1. A graph-based approach to diploid genome assembly, ISMB 2018/Bioinformatics

(https://academic.oup.com/bioinformatics/article/34/13/i105/5045759)

2. Read-based phasing of related individuals, ISMB 2016/ Bioinformatics

(https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4908360/)

Requirements.

1. Programming: C++, python, shell scripting

2. Basic knowledge of bioinformatic tools

3. Enthusiasm to solve the problem

Possible to work remotely, with regular meetings on the MIT/Harvard campus.

What you will get:

- Extensive mentorship in computational methods

- Knowledge of how, conceptually, we can solve biological problems using computational methods.

- The opportunity to work in a diverse environment that includes people with vastly different, but complementary skill sets.

- Responsibility and satisfaction of owning your own project.

You will be directly working with postdoc:

Shilpa Garg, Algorithms in Computational Genomics, HMS

Candidates will be called for a short discussion (interview) to access your creativity,

reasoning, and problem solving skills.

Please contact Shilpa Garg (shilpa_garg@hms.harvard.edu, shilpa.garg2k7@gmail.com)

and include your CV if you’re interested in inventing the future of biology using computational

techniques.

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity at Spaulding Hospital Cambridge INSPIRE Lab for sensorimotor rehabilitation engineering (term-time, summer, or both)

Dr. Randy Trumbower, PT, PhD; Asst Professor, Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at Harvard Medical School, Co-Director, Spinal Cord Injury Division

Contact: Stella Barth, clinical research assistant sbarth@partners.org 617-952-6822

Spaulding Hospital Cambridge, 1575 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138  (half a mile down the street from the Science Center, also accessible via the MBTA 69 bus)

www.inspire-lab.org/

http://spauldingrehab.org/research-and-clinical-trials/INSPIRE_Lab/

Description of the project and duties: Specific projects for students are flexible and will depend on student interests and current staff projects; this is a dynamic and multidisciplinary lab that brings together physical therapy and engineering to better understand motor recovery after neurological injury

Observational and hands-on research experience are available; interested students will have the opportunity to interact with clinical research participants during study visits

http://spauldingrehab.org/research-and-clinical-trials/INSPIRE_Lab/research

Skills required: No prior research experience necessary, just enthusiasm for the mission of the lab: to INSPIRE persons living with paralysis to move

All volunteers must complete onboarding through Spaulding Rehabilitation Network and online CITI training

Learning outcomes: Students will gain exposure to multiple ongoing clinical trials involving motor recovery after spinal cord injury. Depending on student interests and current staff projects, students may gain exposure to the following: recruitment and screening of study participants, scheduling participants, maintaining IRB documents and participant data, EMG data collection and analysis, Optotrak motion capture system and force plate data analysis, physical therapy assessments, engineering, MATLAB, coding, monitoring vital signs, saliva and blood processing and storage, managing lab purchases and expenses

Research skills: study design, engineering for research, an understanding of how clinical trials involving human subjects are run, research specimen collection and processing, literature review, data processing and analysis

Number of hours: Flexible hours, term-time and summer opportunities available, part-time or full-time volunteering

We are particularly interested in students who are able to make a long-term commitment (at least a few months) to helping the lab

Mentoring: Students will work directly with one or more of the following depending on research interests and current staff projects: postdoctoral fellows, engineers, physical therapists, clinical research coordinator and or clinical research assistant

 

This is an unpaid research opportunity. Students are encouraged to apply to HCRP, fellowships, and other funding sources

Please submit contact information, a CV or resume, and a brief statement of interest or cover letter (including term-time / summertime availability) to Stella Barth at sbarth@partners.org

 

 

Posted Feb 7, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity in oral delivery of biological drugs, Mitragotri Lab at Northwestern Building

PI: Prof. Samir Mitragotri
Department: John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Lab location: B154, Northwest Building, 52 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA 02138, https://drugdelivery.seas.harvard.edu

Project description and duties: Oral drug delivery is considered a desirable administration route and offers multiple advantages for patients. However, the natural barriers present in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) prompts many challenges for an effective oral delivery. The project focuses on exploiting ionic liquids as a drug carrier for GI delivery application. The students will be trained on synthesizing range ionic liquids and using analytical techniques to evaluate the products. Students will also be investigating how those ionic liquids interact with biological drugs, cells and animal tissues.

Skills required: No prior research experience is necessary, though being comfortable with wet lab skills would be a plus.

Learning outcomes:

-Chemical synthesis and analysis by NMR, FTIR, HPLC, spectrophotometer

- Light, fluorescence, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)
- ELISA
- Cell and animal tissue handling, histology

- experimental design, data processing and analysis, presentations etc.

Number of hours: hours will be flexible, but we are looking for students who can start asap and hopefully continue for at least 6 months. Students who can commit for Summer 2019 are highly preferred.

Mentoring: Dr. Pavimol Angsantikul a Postdoctoral Fellow will be mentoring the students. More details about her research experience- https://tinyurl.com/yc7u7l9b

Student stipend: No. Students are encouraged to apply to HCRP or other fellowships.

Contact information: Interested undergraduate students can send a CV and contact information to Dr. Pavimol Angsantikul (angsantikul@g.harvard.edu).

 

 

Undergraduate Research Opportunity at Wyss Institute

This project is a collaboration between the labs of George Church and David Walt at the Wyss Institute in Longwood.

Lab Websites:

http://arep.med.harvard.edu/

http://waltlab.bwh.harvard.edu/drw/

Description of the project and duties: This project involves the investigation of extracellular vesicles (also called exosomes), both in terms of their basic biology, and their applications to the diagnosis of neurodegenerative disease. The team working on this project is multidisciplinary and employs a large range of techniques including: stem cell culture and differentiation, high throughput sequencing (RNA-Seq), computational analysis, protein biochemistry, and new techniques for ultrasensitive protein detection.

https://wyss.harvard.edu/david-walt-and-george-church-receive-grant-from-chan-zuckerberg-initiative-to-enable-better-diagnosis-and-monitoring-of-parkinsons-disease/

Skills required. Molecular biology experience required. Experience with mammalian cell culture, RNA work, or protein biochemistry helpful but not required. Programming experience and computational skills analyzing high throughput sequencing data would also be helpful but are not required.

Learning outcome: The student will learn a lot of cutting edge experimental techniques and potentially have opportunities for independent sub-projects, once comfortable with initial techniques. Juniors may consider doing an undergrad thesis in the lab. A previous Harvard undergrad working with us on this project has written a thesis and won a Hoopes Prize for it, was a co-author on several publications, and presented her work at an international conference.

Number of hours students are expected to work: Students are expected to work at least 15 hours per week, on average, during the semester, and full time during the summer. The length of the project is flexible. Although there is no obligation, we are interested in having students potentially continue on in our lab as Research Assistants after graduation for a year or two as a way to gain more research experience and make a larger contribution to the project.

Mentoring: The student will be mentored as part of a team but be primarily mentored by a postdoctoral fellow. There will be regular meetings (about once a week) to discuss research plans, and lots of hands-on instruction in the beginning.

Funding: HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit. Students are encouraged to apply for their own funding, although funding from the lab may be available.

Email your resume and a paragraph about why you are interested in this opportunity to Dima (email: dterovanesyan@fas.harvard.edu)

 

 

Undergraduate research opportunity in 3D bacterial motility, Rowland Institute

The Taute lab at Rowland Institute is offering a funded undergraduate research opportunity focused on studying the motility behavior of well-known bacterial pathogens using high throughput 3D tracking. Motility and chemotaxis are known to contribute to virulence in a number of bacterial pathogens, but neither the underlying mechanisms nor the species’ basic motility behaviors are well understood. Do pathogens exhibit specific motility strategies? How do motility behaviors adapt to lab environments that mimic the physical complexity of the host? How do the bacteria manage to navigate chemical gradients?

The undergraduate researcher will be advised by a postdoc in the lab and will receive training in the following areas:

  • Wet lab and microbiological lab skills,
  • advanced light microscopy,
  • quantitative data analysis,
  • Matlab programming.

Candidates should bring along

  • enthusiasm for interdisciplinary experimental science,
  • strong analytical skills and no fear of quantitative analysis,
  • experience in one or more of the training areas listed above.

The project is funded by the Rowland Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow and Undergraduate Program for the duration of 12 months and will commence as soon as a suitable candidate is identified. The successful candidate

  • will start training in the lab as soon as possible,
  • should be committed to conducting summer research on the project,
  • will be remunerated at a rate of $15/h (810 h/week during the semester, up to 35 h/week during the summer, possible support for Harvard summer housing).

Interested candidates should contact postdoc Marianne Grognot (grognot@rowland.harvard.edu) with a CV, an academic transcript, and a statement of motivation (max. 1 page).

We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, gender identity, sexual orientation, pregnancy and pregnancy-related conditions or any other characteristic protected by law.

 

 

Posted Jan 29, 2019

Undergraduate research, Arnold Lab, MGH, Charlestown Navy Yard

Project 1. The Alzheimer’s Clinical Translational Research Unit (ACTRU, www.actru.org) takes a multidisciplinary, basic science to clinic translational approach to designing patient-oriented experimental and clinical trials for aging and dementia. These involve advanced digital health assessments, neuroimaging, and ultra-sensitive molecular biomarker detection technologies in blood, cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue.  We have a number of projects available for Harvard students, split between wet lab and computer based projects.

Project 2. Defining the role of circular RNA in Alzheimer’s Disease: Circular RNAs are widely expressed in brain, and may play a functional role in regulation of gene expression.  The Arnold lab has found that a circular RNA derived from the IGF2R gene is more highly expressed in brain samples with Alzheimer’s Disease pathology than brains without pathology.  This project will be a wet lab project using qPCR in brain tissue, and cell culture experiments to examine if there may be a functional link between the IGF2R circular RNA and signaling pathways altered in Alzheimer’s Disease.  Supervisor: Dr. Becky Carlyle

Project 3. Exploring methods for the examination of individual differences in Alzheimer’s Disease Brain tissue. Alzheimer’s Disease is a complex neurodegenerative disease driven by intersecting cycles of protein misfolding, oxidative stress and inflammation.  Liquid chromatography mass-spectrometry proteomics from our group and others have shown that there may be substantial individual differences in the activity in these pathways in Alzheimer’s Disease.  In this project you will perform exploratory data analysis on mass spectrometry data from clinically well characterized brain tissue, followed by comparison of different methods of dimension reduction, machine learning and deep learning for the exploration of individual differences and identification of protein modules that may correlate with different aspects of Alzheimer’s Disease.  This is a computer based project and some experience with R and / or MATLAB is required. Supervisors: Dr Becky Carlyle and Dr Hamed Azami

Project 4. Analytical approaches for EEG and MEG techniques in neurology. Alzheimer’s disease affects the interaction between neurons in the brain in patterns that may vary with disease progression.  These interactions can be recorded by electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetoencephalography  (MEG) techniques.  This project will investigate the ability of classical and novel graph based approaches to analysis of multivariate EEG and MEG signals to understand the interdependency of activity recorded at different sites.  This is a computer based project and ideal candidates would have a background in mathematics and some experience in MATLAB. Supervisor: Dr Hamed Azami

If interested, contact Becky Caryle at BCARLYLE@mgh.harvard.edu

 

Undergraduate research opportunity in diabetes and obesity project at Mitragotri Lab at Northwest Building in Cambridge

PI: Samir Mitragotri, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Northwest Building, B153, 52 Oxford St, Cambridge, MA 02138, https://drugdelivery.seas.harvard.edu

The selected undergraduate students will have opportunity of learning and training in synthetic chemistry, characterization, analysis and understanding biological impact of the as synthesized materials. The aims of the ongoing projects are to design and develop oral delivery of peptide that control blood glucose level and helps to reduce body weight.

Skills required. No prior research experience is required! We are looking for students to mentor who has a strong desire and interest on learning drug delivery tool and techniques.

Learning outcome: laboratory skills: chemical synthesis and analysis by NRM, IR, HPLC, LC-MS, UV; research skills: study design, data analysis method, presentations, scientific writing, etc.

We do not expect a student maintain a typical fixed duration within a certain period of time rather we maintain pretty flexible time-frame considering the fact that undergraduate students are under huge load of class and assignments. The project is years long, however a student with a minimum commitment for 3 months are encouraged to apply. We can negotiate the timing and duration.

Mentoring: Md Nurunnabi a Postdoctoral Fellow will be mentoring the students. More details about his research- https://tinyurl.com/y8rmogfh

The students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

Interested undergraduate students are requested to send a CV and contact information to Dr. Nurunnabi (mnurunnabi@g.harvard.edu).

 

 

 

Posted Jan 28, 2019

Undergraduate research opportunity on developing breakthrough technologies to promote effective science communication in biomedical research, MEEI

PI name: Joseph F. Arboleda-Velasquez, M.D., Ph.D.
Department: Department of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School

Contact Information: joseph_arboleda@meei.harvard.edu

Location: Schepens Eye Research Institute, 20 Staniford Street, Boston, MA 02114. Two blocks from the MGH T-stop on the Red Line.

Description of the project and duties: The student will work to develop innovative software and website tools to transform science communication in biomedical research.

Skills required. Students are expected to have experience in software, website development, programming, coding and database building.

Learning outcome: Student will learn to design strategies to overcome barriers in science communication, increase software and programming skills, and learn to work towards user-ready product development.

Number of hours students are expected to work: hours will be flexible but it will be important that the student can start now and commit for Summer 2019 and hopefully continue through the year.

Mentoring: Dr. Arboleda-Velasquez will personally mentor the student via meetings and via participation in group meetings.

Does laboratory provide any funds to pay student’s stipend?

Yes, this is a paid position. Students are encouraged to apply to the HCRP and other fellowships or register for a research course credit.

What information students need to submit and contact information for submitting this information:  Please email Dr. Arboleda-Velasquez with a statement of interest.

 

Posted Jan 2, 2019

 

Research Assistant Positions in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience – Spring Term 2019

Dr. Charles Nelson Harvard Medical School / Boston Children’s Hospital

The Nelson Lab in the Laboratories of Cognitive Neuroscience, located in the Longwood Medical Area, is currently looking for volunteer undergraduate research assistants to work on a broad range of research studies. Our studies focus on several lines of research, including the early identification of autism, the effects of early adversity on brain and behavioral development, and the development of facial recognition and emotion. Each study uses a variety of neuroimaging tools, including electrophysiology, functional near infrared spectroscopy, and magnetic resonance imaging, along with a variety of behavioral tools, including eye tracking and standardized developmental assessments.

The research assistants will gain familiarity with our research methods and may have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience testing infants and/or children and participate in lab meetings and journal clubs (schedule dependent). Primary responsibilities will include assisting with data entry, study visits, and processing behavioral and/or brain-based measures.

These positions are ideal for anyone considering medical school or future graduate study in experimental or developmental psychology or cognitive neuroscience.

Requirements: ability to work with children, familiarity with PC and Mac, self-motivated, and enthusiasm for developmental research. Applicants for these positions must be able to commit at least 10 hours/week during the spring semester. Ideal applicants will be able to continue to assist with studies in the summer and/or following fall semester. Course credit may be given or work study funds may also be used.

To apply, please complete an online application form: https://redcap.tch.harvard.edu/redcap_edc/surveys/?s=V6UudY and upload a statement of interest, along with a CV or resume. To learn more about the research conducted in our lab, visit our website: http://www.childrenshospital.org/research/labs/nelson-laboratory/ongoing-research