Harvard News

New art-making space in Allston opens its doors to the public

New art-making space in Allston opens its doors to the public

September 17, 2019

So where can teachers and students, academics and artists, musicians and dancers with different backgrounds and areas of expertise come together to find and explore the fresh perspectives required to breathe life into new works?

Visit Harvard’s newest laboratory this week to find out.

Located on North Harvard Street, the ArtLab is the University’s latest Allston laboratory devoted to creative inquiry, research, and experimentation. Drawing on Harvard’s myriad artistic makers, the ArtLab will foster interdisciplinary collaboration, investigation, and connection within the community...

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Speaker of the House of Commons John Bercow visits Harvard’s campus

Speaker of the House of Commons John Bercow visits Harvard’s campus

September 17, 2019

John Bercow has become an unlikely international celebrity and YouTube star amid the heated, high-profile Parliamentary debate over Britain’s planned withdrawal from the European Union. Speaker of the House of Commons for a decade, Bercow has become famous for his sharp wit and scathing takedowns of rowdy colleagues, his bellowing calls for “Order!,” and his efforts to democratize Parliament by giving greater voice to backbenchers, or nonparty leaders. (A quick online search will yield several video compilations of him in action during the so-called Brexit deliberations.) Bercow, who has...

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Evolution of the student-athlete experience at Harvard examined

Evolution of the student-athlete experience at Harvard examined

September 16, 2019

Claudine Gay, Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, recently announced a study of the Department of Athletics that will examine the student-athlete experience, culture of programming, and department structure. “This important work will inform strategic planning for Harvard Athletics over the coming decade, drawing on the proud history, traditions, and the values of athletics at Harvard,” she said. The Gazette caught up with Gay and Bob Scalise, the John D. Nichols ’53 Family Director of Athletics, to learn more about the study, how the program has evolved, and the...

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Finding a study space at Harvard’s libraries is easier than ever

Finding a study space at Harvard’s libraries is easier than ever

September 16, 2019

One perk of holding a Harvard ID is access to the numerous study spaces in the Harvard Library system. But with so many options to choose from, selecting the right study spot can leave anyone feeling overwhelmed.

Now, thanks to a new tool — aptly named Find a Space — landing the perfect study space is a click away.

Located on the Harvard Library website, Find a Space allows users to search through more than 100 study spaces in over 15 Harvard libraries based on a variety of criteria, including noise level, whether food is allowed,...

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Harvard president sees University as a force in battle against climate change

September 13, 2019

Universities are among the most creative and powerful forces for shaping the future. At our best, we prepare students to devote their lives to causes larger than themselves. We bring together scholars whose insights help illuminate and address society’s greatest challenges. We convene conversations that help envision how tomorrow might be better than today.

If the future is our genuine concern, we must face up to the stark reality of climate change. The scientific consensus is by now clear: the threat is real, the potential consequences are grave, and the time to focus on solutions is...

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Drone-based monitoring system reveals important information on the health of the Amazon

Drone-based monitoring system reveals important information on the health of the Amazon

September 12, 2019

In 2017, Scot Martin, the Gordon McKay Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), envisioned a novel drone-based chemical monitoring system to track the health of the Amazon in the face of global climate change and human-caused deforestation and burning.

The project would monitor chemical signals emitted by plants known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which help plants interact with organisms...

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Toni Morrison’s lessons take center stage at HDS Convocation

Toni Morrison’s lessons take center stage at HDS Convocation

September 6, 2019

In 2012, Nobel Prize-winning novelist Toni Morrison took the stage in Sanders Theatre and spoke to a rapt audience about goodness, altruism, and the literary imagination.

On that same stage Thursday afternoon, Harvard Divinity School (HDS) paid homage to Morrison, who passed away in August.

Davíd Carrasco, Neil L. Rudenstine Professor of the Study of Latin America at HDS, who knew Morrison as both a friend and colleague, gave the keynote address during “Toni Morrison Stories: Goodness and Mercy and...

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New technique being developed to therapeutically repair and replace human organs

New technique being developed to therapeutically repair and replace human organs

September 6, 2019

Twenty people die every day waiting for an organ transplant in the U.S., and while more than 30,000 patients now receive transplants annually, another 113,000 are currently on organ waitlists.

Many people see artificially grown human organs as the Holy Grail for resolving the organ shortage, and advances in 3D printing have led to a boom in using that technique to build living tissue constructs in the shape of human organs. However, all 3D-printed human tissues to date lack the cellular density and organ-level functions they need to be used in organ repair and replacement.

Now, a...

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The 29th annual Ig Nobel Prize ceremony slated for Sept. 12 at Harvard

The 29th annual Ig Nobel Prize ceremony slated for Sept. 12 at Harvard

September 6, 2019

In 1991, Marc Abrahams founded the Ig Nobel Prize, a parody of the Nobel Prize ceremony that exalts obscure research in science. But his fascination for the funny and weird goes a long way back.

As a fourth-grader growing up in Swampscott, Abrahams was captivated by numbers, and an eccentric, joke-telling math teacher, Mrs. Bondelevitch, had a lot to do with it. His curiosity sparked, Abrahams turned to science and began collecting “weird stuff,” including a newspaper article with the headline, “Man Flushes Toilet, House Explodes,” which...

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Black hole project nets Breakthrough Prize

Black hole project nets Breakthrough Prize

September 5, 2019

The nearly 350 astronomers, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and undergraduates who worked for more than a decade to capture the first-ever image of a black hole have been named the recipients of the 2020 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics.

That collaboration, dubbed the Event Horizon Telescope, unveiled the image in April. It shows a brightly lit ring of photons being cast off from the super-heated material around the fringes of the black hole at the center of the Messier 87 galaxy.

That ring, EHT Director...

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