Announcements

Year Up program provides students with skills, opportunities

Year Up program provides students with skills, opportunities

July 24, 2017

On the website it’s called closing the opportunity divide, equating economic justice with economic prosperity.

In real life it means helping a young person who’s seen friends and relatives die young, who’s known poverty, drugs, violence, and even homelessness, realize his professional potential.

That’s the work of Year Up, the brainchild of Harvard Business School graduate Gerald Chertavian. Since it began in Boston in 2000, Year Up — a nonprofit program that helps underserved young people gain the skills and discipline they need to succeed — has trained and placed nearly 17

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Med School grad to trade scrubs for space suit

Med School grad to trade scrubs for space suit

July 21, 2017

Jonny Kim was in the grocery store when the call came: He would have to exchange his emergency room scrubs for a space suit.

“I was happy, jubilated, excited — all these emotions,” Kim said. “My wife was there. I told her and she was jumping up and down in the grocery store. So we looked silly. I was about to pay for the food.”

Kim, a 2016 Harvard Medical School (HMS) graduate, was one of a dozen candidates picked by NASA

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Chemist Charles M. Lieber receives Harvard’s highest faculty honor

Chemist Charles M. Lieber receives Harvard’s highest faculty honor

July 20, 2017

Acclaimed chemist Charles M. Lieber, a professor in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has been named a University Professor, Harvard’s highest faculty honor.

Lieber will be the first to hold the University Professorship newly established by Joshua Friedman ’76, M.B.A. ’80, J.D. ’82, and Beth Friedman. The chair supports a tenured faculty member who has shown both extraordinary academic accomplishment and leadership within the University

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Novel approach releases immune cells to destroy cancer cells

Novel approach releases immune cells to destroy cancer cells

July 19, 2017

A novel screening method developed by a team at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center — using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology to test the function of thousands of tumor genes in mice — has revealed new drug targets that could potentially enhance the effectiveness of PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors, a promising new class of cancer immunotherapy.

In findings published online today by Nature, the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s team — led by pediatric oncologist

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Understanding how the intestine replaces and repairs itself

Understanding how the intestine replaces and repairs itself

July 14, 2017

Researchers at Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Harvard Medical School have identified a previously unknown mechanism that plays an important role in the regeneration of the inner intestinal lining. Their findings provide new insights on how this tissue, which undergoes change on a daily basis, maintains itself.

The intestine is the most highly regenerative organ in the human body, regenerating its lining, called the epithelium,

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Taking cells out to the movies with new CRISPR technology

Taking cells out to the movies with new CRISPR technology

July 12, 2017

Researchers use expensive machinery to develop ways to harness DNA as a synthetic raw material to store large amounts of digital information outside of living cells.

But what if they could coerce living cells, such as large populations of bacteria, to use their own genomes as a biological hard drive that can record information scientists could tap anytime? That approach not only could open entirely new possibilities of data storage, it could also be engineered into an effective memory device able to create a chronological record of cells’ molecular experiences during development

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Cancer-killing viruses may deliver stem cells to metastasized brain tumors

Cancer-killing viruses may deliver stem cells to metastasized brain tumors

July 11, 2017

Investigators from Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) may have discovered a way to kill tumor cells that have metastasized to the brain.

The team has developed cancer-killing viruses that can deliver stem cells via the carotid artery, and applied them to metastatic tumors in the brains of clinically relevant mouse models. The elimination of metastatic skin cancer cells from the brains of these preclinical models resulted in prolonged survival, the investigators report. The study, published online this week in the journal

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Research may provide the tools to create better schools

Research may provide the tools to create better schools

July 7, 2017

Just as clinical trials are critical to enhancing human health and medicine, field experiments are critical to understanding human learning and education, according to a new paper published in the online journal Science.

A team of economists and psychologists at Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), working together with organizations focused on enhancing education and reducing poverty in India, have demonstrated both the feasibility and the necessity of such experiments, the study noted.

“Research in cognitive science has taught us a

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Thoreau’s 200th birthday brings gift for botanists

Thoreau’s 200th birthday brings gift for botanists

July 7, 2017

Henry David Thoreau wandered the forests and fields around his home in Concord, making the observations that brought him fame. He also collected specimens of the plants he found there, preserving about 820 for identification and study.

That collection, which today resides in the Harvard University Herbaria, is something of a botanical time machine. In combination with the naturalist’s extensive notes about when and where they were collected, the specimens can provide insight about the changes between Thoreau’s time and

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Harvard researchers probe protein diversity

Harvard researchers probe protein diversity

July 7, 2017

Proteins make up a wildly diverse class of molecule, with key roles in everything from catalyzing reactions to helping fight off infection to transporting oxygen through the body. Now, Harvard scientists are beginning to provide answers on drivers of that diversity.

Led by Eugene Shakhnovich, a professor of chemistry and chemical biology, and Amy Gilson, a graduate student in Shakhnovich’s lab, investigators have found that the stability of proteins plays an important role

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