Announcements

Strengthening ties among women in physics

Strengthening ties among women in physics

January 18, 2017

When Margaret Morris looks around her physics class, sometimes she is the only woman there.

Morris, a senior at Brandeis University, is living the reality for physics in the United States. At a time when women make up the majority of the country’s college students, their numbers still trail male peers in certain fields. And in some disciplines, like physics, women remain a small minority.

Last weekend, 250 physics majors gathered at Harvard to take a collective step toward a new reality.

Ensuring high standards

Ensuring high standards

January 17, 2017

Even universities get report cards.

Every decade or so, the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) has its Commission on Institutions of Higher Education (CIHE) review Harvard for reaccreditation. The University was last reaccredited in 2009, and produced an interim report on the results in 2013.

Sugar stands accused

Sugar stands accused

January 12, 2017

Sugar was in the dock at Harvard Law School this week, accused of a prime role in the twin epidemics of obesity and diabetes sweeping the country.

Science journalist and author Gary Taubes ’77 made his case that sugar consumption — which has risen dramatically over the last century — drives metabolic dysfunction that makes people sick. The hour-long talk was sponsored by the Food Law and Policy Clinic and drawn from Taubes’ new book, “The Case Against Sugar.”

A Safe Haven for Scholars at Risk

January 9, 2017

While the fellowship only lasts 10 months, those involved with the Scholars at Risk program aim to make their time as productive as possible and set up scholars for success after Harvard.

Our crumbling infrastructure

Our crumbling infrastructure

January 6, 2017

No matter how big the issue — national security, health care, gun rights — it’s been nearly impossible for Washington lawmakers to find common ground given the deep rancor and partisan division among them. But fixing the nation’s aging, crumbling infrastructure seems that rare area where everyone from the conservative U.S. Chamber of Commerce to progressive Democrats see the need for action.