Announcements

Confronting despair with hope

Confronting despair with hope

December 19, 2014

In Eve Ensler’s latest play, “O.P.C.,” the protagonist struggles to define a new way of living by confronting what she sees as society’s obsession with overconsumption. The young woman, named Romi, is driven by her belief that society is losing time in which to address the mounting ecological crisis. It is this sense of urgency that people immersed in the science around climate change can’t help but live with, said Naomi Klein, an author and syndicated columnist.

Grading 10 top world leaders

Grading 10 top world leaders

December 17, 2014

Here in the United States, many people have become almost oblivious to the daily drumbeat of opinion pollsters declaring what the public thinks about political candidates and leaders. But how people in other countries view their heads of state, and those of other major nations, is terrain that’s not nearly as well-mapped.

Where ideas trump devices

Where ideas trump devices

December 15, 2014

Shoulder to shoulder in the Northwest Labs, students gathered around laptops — 200 at a time — at the CS50 Fair. An annual fixture at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), the fair is an opportunity for students taking the introductory computer science course to show off their final projects to the wider community. It also provides an opportunity for others to see what programming is all about.

Creating ‘genomic origami’

Creating ‘genomic origami’

December 11, 2014

In a triumph for cell biology, researchers have assembled the first high-resolution, 3-D maps of entire folded genomes and found a structural basis for gene regulation, a kind of “genomic origami” that allows the same genome to produce different types of cells. The research appears online Thursday in the journal Cell.

Reproductive strategies

Reproductive strategies

December 10, 2014

It’s a cliché to say it takes a village to raise a child, but it’s a cliché some creatures have taken to heart.

A handful of animals, including ants, bees, termites, and some birds, are what scientists call “eusocial.” That is, they live in tight-knit groups in which some individuals give up some of their reproductive capacity to care for the offspring of others.

While there has been extensive study on how such reproductive strategies might emerge, the question that has long remained unanswered is why an organism might adopt such a strategy in the first place.

'Age is an advantage'

December 10, 2014
Einstein was wrong: You can make a difference in science after 30.

Elsewhere in Science, 5 December 2014

December 5, 2014
Limited free access at Nature … a high-profile visitor at NIH … profile of a public-health celebrity … chimps aren’t people, court says … beyond bibliometrics … Working Life